Author Topic: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People  (Read 322821 times)

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Nikko-chan

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When my husband was at military police school he met a guy from New York who, upon learning that DH was from Oregon, asked "Wow, really? Have you ever had any run-ins with Indians?" He thought it was dangerous to go out into rural areas!

When we were moving from NY to Washington (the state) DH's boss asked him if he "was going to get gun, to protect yourselves from the Injuns." DH said that most of the native Americans we would see were related to me and that it wasn't the wild west from John Wayne movies. Boss was very disappointed to learn that. (Almost 40 years ago, but I recently had to tell the nice lady in the order taking department of a bookseller that same thing!)

How do people grow up thinking that those movies and stuff take place in the present day!?

menley

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When my husband was at military police school he met a guy from New York who, upon learning that DH was from Oregon, asked "Wow, really? Have you ever had any run-ins with Indians?" He thought it was dangerous to go out into rural areas!

When we were moving from NY to Washington (the state) DH's boss asked him if he "was going to get gun, to protect yourselves from the Injuns." DH said that most of the native Americans we would see were related to me and that it wasn't the wild west from John Wayne movies. Boss was very disappointed to learn that. (Almost 40 years ago, but I recently had to tell the nice lady in the order taking department of a bookseller that same thing!)

How do people grow up thinking that those movies and stuff take place in the present day!?

Similar stuff happens to me all the time as a native Texan. I grew up in Houston, then moved to Dallas - two major metropolitan areas, not ranches ;) People ask me all the time what I do with my horse while I'm at work ("So, like, do workplaces have stalls for horses instead of parking spots?") or if it's hard to drive around town with cows everywhere or if we have indoor plumbing yet. I mean, seriously. I've never owned a horse, never seen a cow in the middle of I-10, and we've had indoor plumbing as long as the rest of the country has...

msulinski

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This is another one related to all of this car talk, though it is probably less relevant today than it used to be.

In a manual transmission car, you don't actually need to use the starter to get it running. You just set the ignition to the "on" position, get the car rolling in neutral (helps if you are on a hill), and pop it into gear. The engine will start right up. This helps if you have a dead battery. Of course, if your alternator has failed and the battery is dead, you won't have the necessary electricity to power the spark plugs.

Barney girl

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This is another one related to all of this car talk, though it is probably less relevant today than it used to be.

In a manual transmission car, you don't actually need to use the starter to get it running. You just set the ignition to the "on" position, get the car rolling in neutral (helps if you are on a hill), and pop it into gear. The engine will start right up. This helps if you have a dead battery. Of course, if your alternator has failed and the battery is dead, you won't have the necessary electricity to power the spark plugs.

I've done that before many years ago, but I believe that it's not advisable now cars have catalytic converters.

cwm

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This is another one related to all of this car talk, though it is probably less relevant today than it used to be.

In a manual transmission car, you don't actually need to use the starter to get it running. You just set the ignition to the "on" position, get the car rolling in neutral (helps if you are on a hill), and pop it into gear. The engine will start right up. This helps if you have a dead battery. Of course, if your alternator has failed and the battery is dead, you won't have the necessary electricity to power the spark plugs.

I've done that before many years ago, but I believe that it's not advisable now cars have catalytic converters.

I helped my dad do that on his Jeep several times (car was falling apart under the hood, but he kept that thing running as long as he could), but was informed that I ever tried a stunt like that on either of the manual cars I had, he'd skin me a live. One was a junker but we couldn't afford to buy me anything else if something happened to it, the other was technically a sports car and I wasn't about to risk her life to do that.

I miss my manual transmission cars. They were fun.

nuit93

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This is another one related to all of this car talk, though it is probably less relevant today than it used to be.

In a manual transmission car, you don't actually need to use the starter to get it running. You just set the ignition to the "on" position, get the car rolling in neutral (helps if you are on a hill), and pop it into gear. The engine will start right up. This helps if you have a dead battery. Of course, if your alternator has failed and the battery is dead, you won't have the necessary electricity to power the spark plugs.

I probably could have done that with my old Mazda GLC, but seeing as my 2012 Honda has more computer bits and parts than my first laptop I'm not sure that would work so well.

WillyNilly

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When my husband was at military police school he met a guy from New York who, upon learning that DH was from Oregon, asked "Wow, really? Have you ever had any run-ins with Indians?" He thought it was dangerous to go out into rural areas!

When we were moving from NY to Washington (the state) DH's boss asked him if he "was going to get gun, to protect yourselves from the Injuns." DH said that most of the native Americans we would see were related to me and that it wasn't the wild west from John Wayne movies. Boss was very disappointed to learn that. (Almost 40 years ago, but I recently had to tell the nice lady in the order taking department of a bookseller that same thing!)

How do people grow up thinking that those movies and stuff take place in the present day!?

Similar stuff happens to me all the time as a native Texan. I grew up in Houston, then moved to Dallas - two major metropolitan areas, not ranches ;) People ask me all the time what I do with my horse while I'm at work ("So, like, do workplaces have stalls for horses instead of parking spots?") or if it's hard to drive around town with cows everywhere or if we have indoor plumbing yet. I mean, seriously. I've never owned a horse, never seen a cow in the middle of I-10, and we've had indoor plumbing as long as the rest of the country has...

Honestly as a NYC native we get a similar thing too, just in the opposite direction. I have been asked straight up if I've ever been mugged, raped (yes I was asked that!) or held at gun point. And many people assume all NYer's live in skyscrapers and take yellow cabs everywhere. For the record, living my whole life in NYC none of that is my experience. NYC is very safe - while muggings (and rapes and hold-ups) happen they are pretty rare. And I grew up in a private, non-attached house with a yard, and even now live in a low-rise building with a yard with 5 giant oaks - one right outside my bathroom window. And I own my own vehicle and only take cabs very occasionally. Etc.

Venus193

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Honestly as a NYC native we get a similar thing too, just in the opposite direction. I have been asked straight up if I've ever been mugged, raped (yes I was asked that!) or held at gun point. And many people assume all NYer's live in skyscrapers and take yellow cabs everywhere. For the record, living my whole life in NYC none of that is my experience. NYC is very safe - while muggings (and rapes and hold-ups) happen they are pretty rare. And I grew up in a private, non-attached house with a yard, and even now live in a low-rise building with a yard with 5 giant oaks - one right outside my bathroom window. And I own my own vehicle and only take cabs very occasionally. Etc.

I get these questions, too.  The weirdest is when they come from people who live in a place that has a Metro North connexion they never use to come down to see NYC for themselves.

Virg

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Barney Girl wrote:

"I've done that before many years ago, but I believe that it's not advisable now cars have catalytic converters."

Catalytic converters are devices used to scrub exhaust to cut down on bad emissions out the tailpipe, and so would have nothing to do with the method of starting the engine.  The reason not to do this unless you're in a real bind is that it's very hard on the clutch, which isn't designed for the kind of shock it receives when it's quickly engaged on a non-spinning crankshaft.

nuit93 wrote:

"I probably could have done that with my old Mazda GLC, but seeing as my 2012 Honda has more computer bits and parts than my first laptop I'm not sure that would work so well."

It works just as well on newer cars as older cars, because it's just a way to use the drivetrain as a starter.  The starter just spins the other end of the crankshaft when you turn the key, after all.  The problem is that it's easy to destroy your transmission doing it, which is why it should only be done under desperate circumstances.

Virg

kherbert05

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Similar stuff happens to me all the time as a native Texan. I grew up in Houston, then moved to Dallas - two major metropolitan areas, not ranches ;) People ask me all the time what I do with my horse while I'm at work ("So, like, do workplaces have stalls for horses instead of parking spots?") or if it's hard to drive around town with cows everywhere or if we have indoor plumbing yet. I mean, seriously. I've never owned a horse, never seen a cow in the middle of I-10, and we've had indoor plumbing as long as the rest of the country has...
I've seen I-10/Katy Freeway pretty much shut down by horses and chuck wagons  >:D . They used to let us out of class at Spring Branch JH to watch the trail riders go by.


Growing up we had our Canadian Cousins convinced we had oil wells in the back yard, rode horses to school, all the stereotypes - until we got to the buffalo next door to our school (Memorial Drive Elem). Which was the only grain of truth in the whole story. The couple that owned the land divorced he got the buffalo she got the land.  I'm not kidding you could look up and see the high rises of Downtown Houston but the field directly west of the school was full of buffallo. (All playground space was East of the school building) Only the running track went near the fence between us and the buffalo and teasing them was one of the worse "crimes" you could commit at school.
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jedikaiti

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This is another one related to all of this car talk, though it is probably less relevant today than it used to be.

In a manual transmission car, you don't actually need to use the starter to get it running. You just set the ignition to the "on" position, get the car rolling in neutral (helps if you are on a hill), and pop it into gear. The engine will start right up. This helps if you have a dead battery. Of course, if your alternator has failed and the battery is dead, you won't have the necessary electricity to power the spark plugs.

I've done that before many years ago, but I believe that it's not advisable now cars have catalytic converters.

I know it doesn't work on my 2005 Mini - I had a battery die, and several guys tried the push start method, which failed miserably. It was fun watching them try, though. Eventually they gave up and I got a jump start.
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ti_ax

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Similar stuff happens to me all the time as a native Texan. I grew up in Houston, then moved to Dallas - two major metropolitan areas, not ranches ;) People ask me all the time what I do with my horse while I'm at work ("So, like, do workplaces have stalls for horses instead of parking spots?") or if it's hard to drive around town with cows everywhere or if we have indoor plumbing yet. I mean, seriously. I've never owned a horse, never seen a cow in the middle of I-10, and we've had indoor plumbing as long as the rest of the country has...
I've seen I-10/Katy Freeway pretty much shut down by horses and chuck wagons  >:D . They used to let us out of class at Spring Branch JH to watch the trail riders go by.


Growing up we had our Canadian Cousins convinced we had oil wells in the back yard, rode horses to school, all the stereotypes - until we got to the buffalo next door to our school (Memorial Drive Elem). Which was the only grain of truth in the whole story. The couple that owned the land divorced he got the buffalo she got the land.  I'm not kidding you could look up and see the high rises of Downtown Houston but the field directly west of the school was full of buffallo. (All playground space was East of the school building) Only the running track went near the fence between us and the buffalo and teasing them was one of the worse "crimes" you could commit at school.

After spending a week in Alberta one summer, I would have guessed your cousins were the ones with the oil wells!  ;)

Thipu1

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Honestly as a NYC native we get a similar thing too, just in the opposite direction. I have been asked straight up if I've ever been mugged, raped (yes I was asked that!) or held at gun point. And many people assume all NYer's live in skyscrapers and take yellow cabs everywhere. For the record, living my whole life in NYC none of that is my experience. NYC is very safe - while muggings (and rapes and hold-ups) happen they are pretty rare. And I grew up in a private, non-attached house with a yard, and even now live in a low-rise building with a yard with 5 giant oaks - one right outside my bathroom window. And I own my own vehicle and only take cabs very occasionally. Etc.

I get these questions, too.  The weirdest is when they come from people who live in a place that has a Metro North connexion they never use to come down to see NYC for themselves.

We encounter these odd beliefs about NYC as well.

We were in a cab in New Hampshire with MIL.  When he learned we were from NYC, the driver seriously asked if it was possible for someone to own a single family house with a yard in NYC. When assured that, in the outer boroughs it was, he was amazed.  'Wow!  You mean real people live in
NYC?'

On a cruise, we were coming up the Hudson around sunrise.    There was a bit of morning fog in the streets.  This isn't the least unusual.  It burns off around 9 AM and nobody thinks anything of it. 

 An ignoramus was holding forth to other passengers about the horrible pollution that made NYC air almost unbreathable.  Normally, we don't intrude ourselves into overheard conversations but we had to say something about this.

One of the best/worst had to be what started as a cheerful, 'Where are you good folks from?' exchange.  When we proudly said that we were from Brooklyn, the lady grasped her purse to her chest with both hands and backed away very, very slowly.       

kherbert05

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Similar stuff happens to me all the time as a native Texan. I grew up in Houston, then moved to Dallas - two major metropolitan areas, not ranches ;) People ask me all the time what I do with my horse while I'm at work ("So, like, do workplaces have stalls for horses instead of parking spots?") or if it's hard to drive around town with cows everywhere or if we have indoor plumbing yet. I mean, seriously. I've never owned a horse, never seen a cow in the middle of I-10, and we've had indoor plumbing as long as the rest of the country has...
I've seen I-10/Katy Freeway pretty much shut down by horses and chuck wagons  >:D . They used to let us out of class at Spring Branch JH to watch the trail riders go by.


Growing up we had our Canadian Cousins convinced we had oil wells in the back yard, rode horses to school, all the stereotypes - until we got to the buffalo next door to our school (Memorial Drive Elem). Which was the only grain of truth in the whole story. The couple that owned the land divorced he got the buffalo she got the land.  I'm not kidding you could look up and see the high rises of Downtown Houston but the field directly west of the school was full of buffallo. (All playground space was East of the school building) Only the running track went near the fence between us and the buffalo and teasing them was one of the worse "crimes" you could commit at school.

After spending a week in Alberta one summer, I would have guessed your cousins were the ones with the oil wells!  ;)
Wrong side of the country. Most of my cousins are from PEI either still live there or Toronto. Do have a few in Albert and BC.
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WillyNilly

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Honestly as a NYC native we get a similar thing too, just in the opposite direction. I have been asked straight up if I've ever been mugged, raped (yes I was asked that!) or held at gun point. And many people assume all NYer's live in skyscrapers and take yellow cabs everywhere. For the record, living my whole life in NYC none of that is my experience. NYC is very safe - while muggings (and rapes and hold-ups) happen they are pretty rare. And I grew up in a private, non-attached house with a yard, and even now live in a low-rise building with a yard with 5 giant oaks - one right outside my bathroom window. And I own my own vehicle and only take cabs very occasionally. Etc.

I get these questions, too.  The weirdest is when they come from people who live in a place that has a Metro North connexion they never use to come down to see NYC for themselves.

We encounter these odd beliefs about NYC as well.

We were in a cab in New Hampshire with MIL.  When he learned we were from NYC, the driver seriously asked if it was possible for someone to own a single family house with a yard in NYC. When assured that, in the outer boroughs it was, he was amazed.  'Wow!  You mean real people live in
NYC?'

On a cruise, we were coming up the Hudson around sunrise.    There was a bit of morning fog in the streets.  This isn't the least unusual.  It burns off around 9 AM and nobody thinks anything of it. 

 An ignoramus was holding forth to other passengers about the horrible pollution that made NYC air almost unbreathable.  Normally, we don't intrude ourselves into overheard conversations but we had to say something about this.

One of the best/worst had to be what started as a cheerful, 'Where are you good folks from?' exchange.  When we proudly said that we were from Brooklyn, the lady grasped her purse to her chest with both hands and backed away very, very slowly.     

Hey now, you've been in NYC long enough* you should know - there are a few private, free standing houses with private yards in Manhattan too. Ok there are probably only about 2 dozen or less, but Inwood is still Manhattan and still has single family houses. Not to mention single family Brownstones in mid-town and the Village with backyards, ok those ones aren't free standing, they are attached on their sides, but they are still single family homes.


*based on information gleaned from your previous posts.