Author Topic: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People  (Read 307395 times)

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Twik

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My father did not know the Sun is a star.

Worse, I was unable to ever convince him otherwise.
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

Fliss

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Frankly the above advice about feeding them by scattering food on the lawn is just as bad as someone trying to pet them. Squirrels fed by humans will: 1) Increase beyond the natural capacity of the location to support; 2) Become accustomed and therefore unafraid of humans; and 3) Become aggressive. Feeding squirrels, whether by hand or by scattering food is a very bad idea.


Err . . . .  not entirely true. At least not in Western Australia. I dunno, maybe the climate makes them different here or something.

See, about 100 or so years ago, Indian squirrels were released at Perth zoo. They've never actually really left that area since. True, they HAVE been found along the shore-line to the south, but that's about it. And no, contrary to popular belief, they aren't being predated upon to a great extent. The escarpment where I live is only 30k's from the zoo, so well within reach, but they've never turned up.

The sqirrels at the zoo aren't fed  by staff, btw. And they don't mug you for food either. I've met seagulls who're worse. It's a little bizzare.

So, yes, weird stuff. Like I said, maybe they like the beach too much and are just hanging out on Cottesloe beach at the Indian Tea House and surfing.
Good news! Your insurance company says they'll cover you. Unfortunately, they also say it will be with dirt.

kareng57

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Yes, we do, in fact, vote for Senators.
No, you can not see the Eiffel Tower from everywhere in France.
No, Pennsylvania Dutch do not speak Dutch, they speak German.
No, the Amish do not have to get driver's licenses.
Yes, bob cats can be female. (How did she think they reproduced?  :o)
No, moth balls are not made from dead moths.
No, waxed paper and parchment (baking) paper are not interchangeable.
No, guinea pigs are not from New Guinea.
No, ink jet printers do not print white. You can not stick a black piece of paper in the printer and expect it to "print with the white ink".

All of these were from the same woman. I honestly have no idea how she survived to adulthood.


I disagree with #1.  In some countries, such as Canada, senators are appointed rather than elected.  I don't think that this should be considered a "silly question" from visitors to the US.

Twik

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Yes, bob cats can be female. (How did she think they reproduced?  :o)


Well, I can see the confusion. They're "Bob" cats. The females would be "Robertas", of course.
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

Ereine

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Frankly the above advice about feeding them by scattering food on the lawn is just as bad as someone trying to pet them. Squirrels fed by humans will: 1) Increase beyond the natural capacity of the location to support; 2) Become accustomed and therefore unafraid of humans; and 3) Become aggressive. Feeding squirrels, whether by hand or by scattering food is a very bad idea.


Err . . . .  not entirely true. At least not in Western Australia. I dunno, maybe the climate makes them different here or something.

See, about 100 or so years ago, Indian squirrels were released at Perth zoo. They've never actually really left that area since. True, they HAVE been found along the shore-line to the south, but that's about it. And no, contrary to popular belief, they aren't being predated upon to a great extent. The escarpment where I live is only 30k's from the zoo, so well within reach, but they've never turned up.

The sqirrels at the zoo aren't fed  by staff, btw. And they don't mug you for food either. I've met seagulls who're worse. It's a little bizzare.

So, yes, weird stuff. Like I said, maybe they like the beach too much and are just hanging out on Cottesloe beach at the Indian Tea House and surfing.

From what I could find (information brochures produced by officials, I'm obviously not Australian so maybe they aren't trustworthy?) they would be the same as any other squirrel (that is, potentially aggressive and invasive pest especially with the lack of suitable predators) but the climate isn't favorable to them and squirrels that are found outside the zoo area are removed, like a small colony was removed in 2002. Apparently they get their food from stealing from zoo animals so in a way the zoo feeds them as they have to provide more food.

SheltieMom

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That if a month with 31 days has three Fridays, three Saturdays and three Sundays, it will not be 800+ years before that happens again. It will be no more than 11 years, depending on when the leap years fall.

Slightly off-topic, this website has a calendar that shows the calendars for the years from 1911 to 2016. They have other calendars, including a 10,000 year calendar. Kind of fun to play with:
http://calendarhome.com/tyc/
If Timmy had had a Sheltie, he never would have fallen in that well!

Ereine

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I've met a surprising number of people who were confused by taxes. They can be complicated and I've gotten very confused by them but the basic idea of how income taxing works here is pretty simple. In January you will receive a "tax card" that has the percentage you have to pay tax (and the percentage you have to pay if you go over a limit) for your main job and the percentage you have to pay for your possible side job, so it might for example be 15 % for the main job and 35 % for the side job. So people complain about how difficult it is to work a second job in Finland because it gets taxed so heavily but they don't understand that the tax office doesn't care at all about where you get the money, it's just that most people only have one job so their percentage is calculated for that (it's an estimate based on the previous year's earnings and after the tax year it's checked and balanced) but you can get it adjusted so that you pay the same percentage for both jobs for example, or you pay a little more on your main job and a little less on your side job but there no law that says that side jobs are always taxed 35 %, that's just default to make percentage for the main job as low as possible.

Library Dragon

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Emmy's story reminded me of when my co-worker was called by a colleague in the States (we're in Canada).  The colleague's timezone was two hours before ours.  He called at noon our time and asked my co-worker "Is now a good time to talk?"  My co-worker said "Actually, I was just about to leave for lunch."  Colleague laughed, said "Good one", and proceeded to talk poor co-worker's ear off. 

I have another one - I was visiting Orlando, Florida a few years ago and wanted to send a postcard to my parents in British Columbia.  I didn't know how much postage I'd need, so I asked the drug store clerk.  "How much is it to mail a postcard to Canada?"  "Canada?  Whereabouts in the States is that?"  "It's not a state - it's the country to the north."  Blank look.  I went somewhere else.

I had a letter I was mailing returned the next day to my post office box the next day. I took it to the clerk to ask why. He looked at and asked, "Is this international or domestic?"

'It's going to Ohio.'

"Right.  International or domestic?"

Yes, I had to explain that Ohio is a state. 

~~~

At one time we had a house in Tacoma, Washington.  When DH retired from the Army we had to go deal with the property.  Many of MIL's friends argued that we were going to DC and there was no such state as Washington. 

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Pen^2

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I mentioned at work that I was having a salad for lunch because I was watching my weight.  Male Coworker (supposedly a genius) nearly screamed at me not to do it because lettuce was one of the most fattening foods in existence.  I asked why he thought that, and he said, “Look around.  When you see a fat person eating, what are they eating?  Lettuce!”

I didn’t bother arguing with him because it would not have changed his mind.

Ugh I have wasted far too much of my life trying to explain basic logic to people like this. It bugs me the most when the person has a good set of general knowledge and acts (or professes to be) quite "smart". Ad hoc ergo propter hoc is a very basic and simple logical fallacy. If you don't understand it, then you do not think very logically at all and are not smart, sorry.

I've met people who fall into the appeal to nature fallacy a lot more, though. I once had to take a woman out of a meeting to slap some sense into her or at least get her to shut up: during the meeting, there was a brief presentation on raising money for TB or something in various poor African countries. She had said, confidently and pleasantly, "but they live naturally, so they don't get sick! I'm not giving money to such an obvious scam!" Everyone else was horrified, mouths agape, and once I had dragged her out it took me a long time to explain that actually, a lot of "natural" things are worse, such as childbirth (20-25% mortality pre-modern medicine), tumours (slow and painful death), a great deal of genetic diseases (you would just die without modern health), and health in general (spectacles, sanitation, immunisations, etc.) Plus education and so on. People who think that "natural = automatically better" and that modern advances and technology are by default evil and bad make me feel actually nauseous.

cabbageweevil

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At one time we had a house in Tacoma, Washington.  When DH retired from the Army we had to go deal with the property.  Many of MIL's friends argued that we were going to DC and there was no such state as Washington.

I hope I won't be thought too cheeky for observing, as a non-American, that some US place-naming does seem rather to invite the muddling-up of things -- in the light of how people tend to be easily confused.  I can kind-of sympathise with non-geographically-minded folk getting befuddled over the capital of the US being the city of Washington, in the District of Columbia; whereas there's also a state of Washington, some couple-of-thousand-plus miles away -- through which the Columbia River runs !

Likewise with the thing heard of quite often -- including from a PP on this thread -- of people getting bemused about the state of New Mexico, and thinking that the independent nation of Mexico is being referred to. Most of us can be pretty dense about something or other: with the way that a fair number of people tend towards mental blocks / confusion, about place-names, one could feel that those who originally named the locations concerned, might have taken thought about that; and tried to avoid the confusion-potential.

BB-VA

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I mentioned at work that I was having a salad for lunch because I was watching my weight.  Male Coworker (supposedly a genius) nearly screamed at me not to do it because lettuce was one of the most fattening foods in existence.  I asked why he thought that, and he said, “Look around.  When you see a fat person eating, what are they eating?  Lettuce!”

I didn’t bother arguing with him because it would not have changed his mind.

Ugh I have wasted far too much of my life trying to explain basic logic to people like this. It bugs me the most when the person has a good set of general knowledge and acts (or professes to be) quite "smart". Ad hoc ergo propter hoc is a very basic and simple logical fallacy. If you don't understand it, then you do not think very logically at all and are not smart, sorry.

I've met people who fall into the appeal to nature fallacy a lot more, though. I once had to take a woman out of a meeting to slap some sense into her or at least get her to shut up: during the meeting, there was a brief presentation on raising money for TB or something in various poor African countries. She had said, confidently and pleasantly, "but they live naturally, so they don't get sick! I'm not giving money to such an obvious scam!" Everyone else was horrified, mouths agape, and once I had dragged her out it took me a long time to explain that actually, a lot of "natural" things are worse, such as childbirth (20-25% mortality pre-modern medicine), tumours (slow and painful death), a great deal of genetic diseases (you would just die without modern health), and health in general (spectacles, sanitation, immunisations, etc.) Plus education and so on. People who think that "natural = automatically better" and that modern advances and technology are by default evil and bad make me feel actually nauseous.

My stock comment to those who have the "all natural = good for you" mindset is "Snake venom is all-natural too."
"The Universe puts us in places where we can learn. They are never easy places, but they are right. Wherever we are, it's the right place and the right time. Pain that sometimes comes is part of the process of constantly being born."
- Delenn to Sheridan: "Babylon 5 - Distant Star"

RingTailedLemur

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My stock comment to those who have the "all natural = good for you" mindset is "Snake venom is all-natural too."

Mine usual example is arsenic :)

Tia2

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That once something is frozen, it has to be left in the freezer to stay frozen.

Seriously, this was a 45 year old man who put his ice pop in the department refrigerator (as opposed to the ice box) because he thought that once it was frozen, it would stay that way.

Margo

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Yes, we do, in fact, vote for Senators.
No, you can not see the Eiffel Tower from everywhere in France.
No, Pennsylvania Dutch do not speak Dutch, they speak German.
No, the Amish do not have to get driver's licenses.
Yes, bob cats can be female. (How did she think they reproduced?  :o)
No, moth balls are not made from dead moths.
No, waxed paper and parchment (baking) paper are not interchangeable.
No, guinea pigs are not from New Guinea.
No, ink jet printers do not print white. You can not stick a black piece of paper in the printer and expect it to "print with the white ink".

All of these were from the same woman. I honestly have no idea how she survived to adulthood.
I think that the Pennsylvania dutch and Amish drivers are also very location specific. It's not unreasonable to think that people driving horse drawn vehicles might require some type of permit to do so.
Same with baking paper and waxed paper. After all, baking paper and baking parchment are interchangable (although here, at least, they are slightly different products). I would see that at something it would be reasonable for a person to chekc, if they haven't used both, but I wouldn;t be surprised if someone asked.

The printer and Eiffel towers ones are weird, though!

BB-VA

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I think the Eiffel Tower effect probably comes from movies - any time the location is France, the Eiffel Tower seems to be visible.  Just as in any movie/TV show set in Washington, DC has a view of the Capitol from any windowed office. 

"The Universe puts us in places where we can learn. They are never easy places, but they are right. Wherever we are, it's the right place and the right time. Pain that sometimes comes is part of the process of constantly being born."
- Delenn to Sheridan: "Babylon 5 - Distant Star"