Author Topic: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People  (Read 300622 times)

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Pioneer

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This thread reminded me of a high school football game that was temporarily suspended when a rainstorm started up, complete with thunder and lightning.   There wasn't much for other (younger) students to do but chase each in the wet grass and mud, and some became unruly.  The announcer proclaimed, "Please, everyone, be seated on the bleachers until the storm passes."  A few moments later the announcer amended, "Um, everyone should please get down from the METAL bleachers during this LIGHTNING storm."
"Try to live your life so that you wouldn't be afraid to sell the family parrot to the town gossip." -- Will Rogers

katycoo

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Quote
You're lucky; you have a climate where it's feasible. It isn't in much of the US- it gets too cold. I can't imagine trying to deal with a hot water heater that's outside when it's blizzarding or 30 below zero.

Australia has all that and manages. (puzzled) You don't really think it's all sunshine and sunny days, do you?

Well I didn't actually think you got 5 feet of snow a year which hung around for months and at times stayed below zero for weeks, no.

It can do in the snowfields in winter, and its quite usual in the central plateau areas of Tasmania.


katycoo

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What everyone really should know about diamonds. It's obvious when you think about it.

http://au.businessinsider.com/why-diamonds-are-a-sham-2013-3

Sure. But I like diamonds. Mine is fairly modest, purchased wholesale, with the setting designed by me. I know every single stat of the diamond grade so I know its quality and flaws, and I'm perfectly comfortable with both its purchase price and its insurance value.  While I can't say for certain that the diamonds were not overpriced by the wholesaler (research only gets you so far), I wasn't swindled by hidden inclusions or colour flaws.

This knowledge (whilst interesting) doesn't afect my enjoyment of my wedding bands one bit.

Also, as much as I liike coloured stones (and desire a collection of them one day) its less practical for everyday wear IMO as the don't t match quite so much.

Virg

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Fliss wrote:

"We have an outside gas heater (it replaced the wood copper in the laundry about 25 years ago. Not joking), and while they don't often go out, ours does about 3-4 times a year. Perth has some serious winds called 'catabriatics' that like to roar up to the escarpment and swirl around like mad, often for days on end. Where we are, this means our suburb is very practised in restarting the heaters."

This is the part that confuses me.  If you're located in an area where you have sustained high winds and a gas water heater, why would you use a pilot valve?  I think I'd pay to have an ignition valve installed, since they're not that expensive and you'll never have to worry about wind blowing out an electric starter.  Truth be told, I haven't seen a gas appliance with a pilot light for quite some time, and I wouldn't even know where to shop for one any more.

Virg

NyaChan

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This thread reminded me of a high school football game that was temporarily suspended when a rainstorm started up, complete with thunder and lightning.   There wasn't much for other (younger) students to do but chase each in the wet grass and mud, and some became unruly.  The announcer proclaimed, "Please, everyone, be seated on the bleachers until the storm passes."  A few moments later the announcer amended, "Um, everyone should please get down from the METAL bleachers during this LIGHTNING storm."

hahaha glad he caught that

cwm

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Fliss wrote:

"We have an outside gas heater (it replaced the wood copper in the laundry about 25 years ago. Not joking), and while they don't often go out, ours does about 3-4 times a year. Perth has some serious winds called 'catabriatics' that like to roar up to the escarpment and swirl around like mad, often for days on end. Where we are, this means our suburb is very practised in restarting the heaters."

This is the part that confuses me.  If you're located in an area where you have sustained high winds and a gas water heater, why would you use a pilot valve?  I think I'd pay to have an ignition valve installed, since they're not that expensive and you'll never have to worry about wind blowing out an electric starter.  Truth be told, I haven't seen a gas appliance with a pilot light for quite some time, and I wouldn't even know where to shop for one any more.

Virg

Wait, they make gas appliances without pilot lights? Seriously...I mean, I've never had my own home to take care of, but we always had a pilot light growing up, and I had to go re-light my boyfriend's a month or so ago, because it went out. Does the ignition valve work like the auto-light features on gas grills?

Virg

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cwm wrote:

"Does the ignition valve work like the auto-light features on gas grills?"

In a word, yes.  The valve has a spark generator and a computer controlled valve, and when the appliance needs fire it starts the burner with a spark.  Most people have encountered this on a gas grill or gas stovetop (that ticking noise when one turns the stove on is the igniter) and every gas appliance in my house uses ignition valves.  I haven't seen a pilot light for almost twenty years.

Virg

jpcher

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Fliss wrote:

"We have an outside gas heater (it replaced the wood copper in the laundry about 25 years ago. Not joking), and while they don't often go out, ours does about 3-4 times a year. Perth has some serious winds called 'catabriatics' that like to roar up to the escarpment and swirl around like mad, often for days on end. Where we are, this means our suburb is very practised in restarting the heaters."

This is the part that confuses me.  If you're located in an area where you have sustained high winds and a gas water heater, why would you use a pilot valve?  I think I'd pay to have an ignition valve installed, since they're not that expensive and you'll never have to worry about wind blowing out an electric starter.  Truth be told, I haven't seen a gas appliance with a pilot light for quite some time, and I wouldn't even know where to shop for one any more.

Virg

Wait, they make gas appliances without pilot lights? Seriously...I mean, I've never had my own home to take care of, but we always had a pilot light growing up, and I had to go re-light my boyfriend's a month or so ago, because it went out. Does the ignition valve work like the auto-light features on gas grills?



Yes. My gas stove/oven has an electric-start ignition to it. There is no ever-lit pilot light. Once the nob is pushed, the gas starts to flow and the ignition strikes a spark, which lights the gas.

My dryer also has the same electric-start ignition.

Even though the cost difference is minor, you do not have to pay for gas in order to keep a pilot light lit.

Downfall is when electricity goes out. However, I can still turn on my stove top by pushing in the button to start the gas, holding a match to the burners and the stove top will light up . . . turning on my drier during an electric outage is a different story, because the workings are in the back of the machine, way too much work.



To Virg's bold above . . . the pilot light on my water heater is enclosed behind a cover. Unless the cover is removed, you can't even see the inner workings, including the pilot light. I'm thinking that's the enclosed style cwm has -- where wind would not be a factor. (eta--my water heater is still an ever-lit pilot. It's about 10-12 years old.)




(Virg posted while I was typing.)
« Last Edit: June 11, 2013, 02:40:44 PM by jpcher »

Virg

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jpcher wrote:

"Downfall is when electricity goes out."

Other than a stovetop, which can be lit by hand, or a gas oven which is admittedly useless when there's no power because you can't open the valve without electricity, no other gas appliances work properly without power.  A furnace or water heater needs the blower to clear carbon monoxide and other exhaust from the burner (both for safety and because the flame would starve with no fresh oxygen supply), and a gas clothes dryer could heat but again, with no blower to move air or drum motor to tumble the clothes I can't see how it would work.  But hey, it would stand in pretty well for the nonfunctional oven.  >:D

"To Virg's bold above . . . the pilot light on my water heater is enclosed behind a cover. Unless the cover is removed, you can't even see the inner workings, including the pilot light. I'm thinking that's the enclosed style cwm has -- where wind would not be a factor."

Even an enclosed housing won't protect a tiny flame from a sustained high power wind.  A strong linear wind exerts significant suction force on an enclosed space which can extinguish a pilot, as evidenced by Fliss's suburb having to relight their pilots on a regular basis.  To get a feel for this force, just drive on the highway with the windows up, and then open a window and you'll feel a significant drop in air pressure at the start.

Virg

Jocelyn

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This thread reminded me of a high school football game that was temporarily suspended when a rainstorm started up, complete with thunder and lightning.   There wasn't much for other (younger) students to do but chase each in the wet grass and mud, and some became unruly.  The announcer proclaimed, "Please, everyone, be seated on the bleachers until the storm passes."  A few moments later the announcer amended, "Um, everyone should please get down from the METAL bleachers during this LIGHTNING storm."
I was part of a team participating in an SCA (medieval historical reenactment group) quest, which involved both trivia and fighting, so each team had armored fighters as well as non-combatants. Towards the end of the time allotted, it started to rain, so the organizers of the quest sent heralds out to tell us to come in from the field... and gather under a very large tree. There was a stunned silence as everyone took it in, then the proverbial little voice at the back of the room said, 'Shall we have a fighter climb to the top of the tree as a lookout?'

Yes, they were instructing people in aluminum suits to cluster in tightly under a tree in a storm...

WillyNilly

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This thread reminded me of a high school football game that was temporarily suspended when a rainstorm started up, complete with thunder and lightning.   There wasn't much for other (younger) students to do but chase each in the wet grass and mud, and some became unruly.  The announcer proclaimed, "Please, everyone, be seated on the bleachers until the storm passes."  A few moments later the announcer amended, "Um, everyone should please get down from the METAL bleachers during this LIGHTNING storm."
I was part of a team participating in an SCA (medieval historical reenactment group) quest, which involved both trivia and fighting, so each team had armored fighters as well as non-combatants. Towards the end of the time allotted, it started to rain, so the organizers of the quest sent heralds out to tell us to come in from the field... and gather under a very large tree. There was a stunned silence as everyone took it in, then the proverbial little voice at the back of the room said, 'Shall we have a fighter climb to the top of the tree as a lookout?'

Yes, they were instructing people in aluminum suits to cluster in tightly under a tree in a storm...

As a general rule, its safe to say if Homer Simpson would do it, the rest of us should not!

It all started last year during a terrible thunderstorm, when I locked myself out of the house.  Shelving myself with a large piece of sheet metal, I ran for cover under the tallest tree I could find!
   -- Homer Simpson, Safety Inspector, ``Homer at the Bat''

Fliss

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RE: Gas heater lights

Ours is totally gas operated. That means that we have hot water even without power. The pilot light is safely enclosed. The idea of an exterior heater is that natural air movement keeps the gas buildup from happening. The light uses pisio-electric to light the gas. The sort of wind that will blow it out is the sort that will lift roofs, so having to relight the heater is small potatoes.

RE: Gas stove

Again, ours is fully gas. We have boiling water and cooked food whatever happens. And again, pisio-electric starter for the oven, and flame ignition for the top. Ever-starts are far too dangerous for my liking. And having to physically re-light the gas after it's out means it's checked for any problems.

RE: Snow

Tasmanian high country and plateaus spend up to 7 months in deep snow, and some are completely gas power. The electric supply can be erratic, so gas is trucked in and tanked. It provides everything from heating to power to cooking.
Good news! Your insurance company says they'll cover you. Unfortunately, they also say it will be with dirt.

Thipu1

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Re the thunderstorm.

SIL is an avid golfer.  During one of our weekly phone calls, she related the following:

'it was the freakiest thing.  We were out on the course when we heard thunder and the sky got dark.  All of a sudden, Icould feel the hairs on the back of my neck standings up'.

She and her friends were lucky to get off the golf course alive.

 

Isometric

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What everyone really should know about diamonds. It's obvious when you think about it.

http://au.businessinsider.com/why-diamonds-are-a-sham-2013-3

I respectfully disagree with this article. I think the word "diamonds" could be be replaced by "brand new cars" "designer clothing" or even "canned corn" - something is worth what we are willing to pay for it - even if that came around by clever advertising. I would never pay $3,000+ for a handbag, but there are lots of people who will, even though surely they must realize there is a only a few hundred dollars worth of materials and workmanship involved. It's about the brand, or the "prestige".

The ethical concerns also extend to other industries - slave labor for making clothes, the use of leather and fur in clothing and handbags, sourcing of ingredients/destroying habitats for our favorite meals.

Slartibartfast

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What everyone really should know about diamonds. It's obvious when you think about it.

http://au.businessinsider.com/why-diamonds-are-a-sham-2013-3

I respectfully disagree with this article. I think the word "diamonds" could be be replaced by "brand new cars" "designer clothing" or even "canned corn" - something is worth what we are willing to pay for it - even if that came around by clever advertising. I would never pay $3,000+ for a handbag, but there are lots of people who will, even though surely they must realize there is a only a few hundred dollars worth of materials and workmanship involved. It's about the brand, or the "prestige".

The ethical concerns also extend to other industries - slave labor for making clothes, the use of leather and fur in clothing and handbags, sourcing of ingredients/destroying habitats for our favorite meals.

True, but diamonds are one of the few things that are ONLY defined by their inflated value.  You can drive a new car, you can wear designer clothing, you can eat canned corn - all a diamond is good for is looking pretty and showing off how much money you can afford to blow on a (literal) rock.  People assume that because they cost a lot, they must be rare - and that really isn't true.