Author Topic: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People  (Read 307224 times)

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CharlieBraun

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I do know that they sell a special blend of freeze-proof diesel fuel here year round.  And the water in my windscreen washer freezes solid regularly.  We've also had a white Christmas - in the middle of our summer.

Russians call that "vodka."
"We ate the pies."

Julian

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I do know that they sell a special blend of freeze-proof diesel fuel here year round.  And the water in my windscreen washer freezes solid regularly.  We've also had a white Christmas - in the middle of our summer.

Russians call that "vodka."

 ;D ;D ;D

White Dragon

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My cousin is the eldest of 5 kids. She is part has a large extended family - one of those families where the moms' and aunties' sole mission is that no one ever starves.  :D  Food was a huge part of every family gathering.

In spite of this, neither cousin nor her sisters ever learned to cook. Mom 'did for' her kids until they moved out. While a loving environment, this left cousin a bit under-prepared for life on her own.

So, a few weeks after her wedding, Cousin was making her new husband a nice dinner.
Cue a frantic call to her mother. Cousin is at the liquor store and can't find the powder.
The what?
The powder!
Because, you see, the recipe called for dry white wine.... :o :o :o

And in case you were wondering, Cousin is a school teacher.

KenveeB

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I actually had a very similar moment once when a recipe called for a dry sherry, White Dragon. I just assumed it was a special cooking ingredient and browsed around looking for it, then had a "Oh, wait, I bet it means--" moment.

Firecat

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I actually had a very similar moment once when a recipe called for a dry sherry, White Dragon. I just assumed it was a special cooking ingredient and browsed around looking for it, then had a "Oh, wait, I bet it means--" moment.

Along these lines, I once had to explain to a guy in the grocery store - and a grocery store employee - what "dry pasta" was.

DH and I were doing our shopping, and I noticed a guy walking through the store with a cookbook open in the cart and an employee walking with him. This is a local chain that's a bit more upscale; they tend to be very about customer service, sell fancier stuff, etc. So I assumed that the employee was helping him find some things he needed.

A few minutes later, DH and I see them again in the dairy section, both looking confused. Being basically nosy ;), I asked if I could help. They explained that they were looking for "dry pasta." After retrieving my jaw from the floor, I asked if I could look at the recipe, explained that they needed noodles, and suggested a couple of types I thought would work with the recipe, since there wasn't a specific type listed in the recipe.

They were both appreciative, and we saw them a third time, this time with a bag of noodles in the cart.

Bluenomi

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MommyPenguin wrote:

"I think that people also have the tendency to think that bullets can penetrate, well, people, but not things.  Think of how many cop shows you see in which a cop hides behind an open car door while a ton of bullets slam into the door, magically stopped by the (reinforced concrete?) door, leaving the cop in safety to shoot around the sides."

There's a real world exception to this.  These days, most police vehicles are reinforced to allow officers to hide behind doors or the body of the car, and they will indeed stop most bullets.  Back when it was popular on TV, it was absolutely false, but these days it's much more likely to happen.

Virg

Yes, but *my* car door isn't reinforced.

And I wonder how well insulated the water heaters in Australia are--because I'd be less worried about freezing and more worried about slow heat loss and inefficient (therefore more expensive) energy use.

Depends on the type of water heater. Mine is instant gas so doesn't actually have a water tank, it heats the water as I use it so it's only outside to vent the burning gas. Electric tanks tend to have very thick walls to keep the water to temp for as long as possible which is why they cost more to run.

Sirius

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How about: the difference between astrology and astronomy. I was teaching a class about the solar system, and a disturbingly large number of the kids' parents thought, based on the unit name, that we would be learning about gemini and sagittarius and all that. Some rang up to ask why we would be spending so long (4 weeks) on it.

Aaaaaaarrrrrrrrgggggggghhhhhhhhhh!

Had a definitely ex-boyfriend tell me that astronomy and astrology were the same thing, and if I thought otherwise I was deluded.  I wasn't the one who was deluded, pal. 

kareng57

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I actually had a very similar moment once when a recipe called for a dry sherry, White Dragon. I just assumed it was a special cooking ingredient and browsed around looking for it, then had a "Oh, wait, I bet it means--" moment.

Along these lines, I once had to explain to a guy in the grocery store - and a grocery store employee - what "dry pasta" was.

DH and I were doing our shopping, and I noticed a guy walking through the store with a cookbook open in the cart and an employee walking with him. This is a local chain that's a bit more upscale; they tend to be very about customer service, sell fancier stuff, etc. So I assumed that the employee was helping him find some things he needed.

A few minutes later, DH and I see them again in the dairy section, both looking confused. Being basically nosy ;), I asked if I could help. They explained that they were looking for "dry pasta." After retrieving my jaw from the floor, I asked if I could look at the recipe, explained that they needed noodles, and suggested a couple of types I thought would work with the recipe, since there wasn't a specific type listed in the recipe.

They were both appreciative, and we saw them a third time, this time with a bag of noodles in the cart.


Re the employee:  of course that was inexcusable, especially in a high-end store.

But I wouldn't say so re the customer.  If he'd grown up with someone (like Mom) always making fresh pasta in the home, or always buying fresh pasta, he might not have known that dried pasta was available.

Sirius

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My sister and I get mistaken for twins.

Or when my friend V joins us, people think that V and I are sisters and my actual sister is the friend tagging along.

The sad thing is, if you look at facial structure and looks, sis and I are the closest match. If you look at skin tone and coloration, sis and V are the closest match. The only reason they think V and I are the sisters is because we're closer in height. It's bizarre.

My sister is a brunette.  When we were in high school her best friend was a redhead, as am I.  If you look at pictures of us from that era, Friend and I actually resembled each other quite a bit, and we both played clarinet.  I spent most of my high school years being mistaken for her.  I got in trouble more than once because of her, too; once I had to run around the band for talking in the ranks (I had no idea who I was supposedly talking to, as I was in an outside file next to a stoner bass drummer.  Afterward Friend came and apologized and told me it was her talking in the ranks.  The band director called me by her name all the time, and in fact I don't think he realized that we were different people until we were in the same band class in our junior year, and as late as 2004 I was still being mistaken for this person even though we graduated in 1976.   

TootsNYC

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I actually had a very similar moment once when a recipe called for a dry sherry, White Dragon. I just assumed it was a special cooking ingredient and browsed around looking for it, then had a "Oh, wait, I bet it means--" moment.

Along these lines, I once had to explain to a guy in the grocery store - and a grocery store employee - what "dry pasta" was.


On our honeymoon, we went into a pub in England. I asked for cider, and the guy asked, "dry or sweet?" What's the difference? I asked. He answered right away, "One of them is dry, and the other . . . . is sweet." Right about that ellipsis, he realize exactly how stupid the question had been.

katycoo

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I actually had a very similar moment once when a recipe called for a dry sherry, White Dragon. I just assumed it was a special cooking ingredient and browsed around looking for it, then had a "Oh, wait, I bet it means--" moment.

Along these lines, I once had to explain to a guy in the grocery store - and a grocery store employee - what "dry pasta" was.


On our honeymoon, we went into a pub in England. I asked for cider, and the guy asked, "dry or sweet?" What's the difference? I asked. He answered right away, "One of them is dry, and the other . . . . is sweet." Right about that ellipsis, he realize exactly how stupid the question had been.

You're lucky the question wasn't, 'sweet, dry or draught'.  I've never actually had the definition of draught explained, but I think it is 'somewhere in the middle'

RingTailedLemur

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My ex, in his mid-twenties, told me off for buying a 2kg bag of dry pasta on a student budget.  He said I'd never be able to eat it all before it expired and shrieked at me in the shop, "well, I hope you can freeze it!".  I just stood there, staring at him with this expression:  :o saying, "but it's dry pasta...".  Idiot!

Flibbertigibbet

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*Aside* - 'draught' just means that it comes from a cask or keg rather than a bottle or can*, so you can have dry or sweet draught cider - it just refers to the method of storage and delivery. Draught is considered 'superior'.

*to confuse things there are now cans which call themselves 'draught'. That's because they have a widget in them which replicates the pressurised storage method of the cask or keg, so is supposed to taste similar.

katycoo

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*Aside* - 'draught' just means that it comes from a cask or keg rather than a bottle or can*, so you can have dry or sweet draught cider - it just refers to the method of storage and delivery. Draught is considered 'superior'.

*to confuse things there are now cans which call themselves 'draught'. That's because they have a widget in them which replicates the pressurised storage method of the cask or keg, so is supposed to taste similar.

Hmm. It is bottled and sold as a third option, separate to sweet or dry.  No widgets in bottles.  Based on your description, I suspect we're both right - that they're all technically draught, but the "plain" draught flavour is between sweet and dry.

nutraxfornerves

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There is another kind of cider--hard. In the US, "cider" is a non-alcoholic juice, usually apple, unless otherwise specified. If you want cider that has been fermented into something alcoholic, you wand "hard cider." (There is a debate as to whether "cider" and "apple juice" are the same thing or not. I once researched it and concluded that the answer is sometimes, sometimes not. Among other things, the distinction appears to be regional.)

Nutrax
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