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  • October 21, 2017, 12:17:40 AM

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Author Topic: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People  (Read 1212630 times)

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KenveeB

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I actually had a very similar moment once when a recipe called for a dry sherry, White Dragon. I just assumed it was a special cooking ingredient and browsed around looking for it, then had a "Oh, wait, I bet it means--" moment.

Firecat

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I actually had a very similar moment once when a recipe called for a dry sherry, White Dragon. I just assumed it was a special cooking ingredient and browsed around looking for it, then had a "Oh, wait, I bet it means--" moment.

Along these lines, I once had to explain to a guy in the grocery store - and a grocery store employee - what "dry pasta" was.

DH and I were doing our shopping, and I noticed a guy walking through the store with a cookbook open in the cart and an employee walking with him. This is a local chain that's a bit more upscale; they tend to be very about customer service, sell fancier stuff, etc. So I assumed that the employee was helping him find some things he needed.

A few minutes later, DH and I see them again in the dairy section, both looking confused. Being basically nosy ;), I asked if I could help. They explained that they were looking for "dry pasta." After retrieving my jaw from the floor, I asked if I could look at the recipe, explained that they needed noodles, and suggested a couple of types I thought would work with the recipe, since there wasn't a specific type listed in the recipe.

They were both appreciative, and we saw them a third time, this time with a bag of noodles in the cart.

Bluenomi

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MommyPenguin wrote:

"I think that people also have the tendency to think that bullets can penetrate, well, people, but not things.  Think of how many cop shows you see in which a cop hides behind an open car door while a ton of bullets slam into the door, magically stopped by the (reinforced concrete?) door, leaving the cop in safety to shoot around the sides."

There's a real world exception to this.  These days, most police vehicles are reinforced to allow officers to hide behind doors or the body of the car, and they will indeed stop most bullets.  Back when it was popular on TV, it was absolutely false, but these days it's much more likely to happen.

Virg

Yes, but *my* car door isn't reinforced.

And I wonder how well insulated the water heaters in Australia are--because I'd be less worried about freezing and more worried about slow heat loss and inefficient (therefore more expensive) energy use.

Depends on the type of water heater. Mine is instant gas so doesn't actually have a water tank, it heats the water as I use it so it's only outside to vent the burning gas. Electric tanks tend to have very thick walls to keep the water to temp for as long as possible which is why they cost more to run.

Sirius

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How about: the difference between astrology and astronomy. I was teaching a class about the solar system, and a disturbingly large number of the kids' parents thought, based on the unit name, that we would be learning about gemini and sagittarius and all that. Some rang up to ask why we would be spending so long (4 weeks) on it.

Aaaaaaarrrrrrrrgggggggghhhhhhhhhh!

Had a definitely ex-boyfriend tell me that astronomy and astrology were the same thing, and if I thought otherwise I was deluded.  I wasn't the one who was deluded, pal. 

kareng57

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I actually had a very similar moment once when a recipe called for a dry sherry, White Dragon. I just assumed it was a special cooking ingredient and browsed around looking for it, then had a "Oh, wait, I bet it means--" moment.

Along these lines, I once had to explain to a guy in the grocery store - and a grocery store employee - what "dry pasta" was.

DH and I were doing our shopping, and I noticed a guy walking through the store with a cookbook open in the cart and an employee walking with him. This is a local chain that's a bit more upscale; they tend to be very about customer service, sell fancier stuff, etc. So I assumed that the employee was helping him find some things he needed.

A few minutes later, DH and I see them again in the dairy section, both looking confused. Being basically nosy ;), I asked if I could help. They explained that they were looking for "dry pasta." After retrieving my jaw from the floor, I asked if I could look at the recipe, explained that they needed noodles, and suggested a couple of types I thought would work with the recipe, since there wasn't a specific type listed in the recipe.

They were both appreciative, and we saw them a third time, this time with a bag of noodles in the cart.


Re the employee:  of course that was inexcusable, especially in a high-end store.

But I wouldn't say so re the customer.  If he'd grown up with someone (like Mom) always making fresh pasta in the home, or always buying fresh pasta, he might not have known that dried pasta was available.

Sirius

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My sister and I get mistaken for twins.

Or when my friend V joins us, people think that V and I are sisters and my actual sister is the friend tagging along.

The sad thing is, if you look at facial structure and looks, sis and I are the closest match. If you look at skin tone and coloration, sis and V are the closest match. The only reason they think V and I are the sisters is because we're closer in height. It's bizarre.

My sister is a brunette.  When we were in high school her best friend was a redhead, as am I.  If you look at pictures of us from that era, Friend and I actually resembled each other quite a bit, and we both played clarinet.  I spent most of my high school years being mistaken for her.  I got in trouble more than once because of her, too; once I had to run around the band for talking in the ranks (I had no idea who I was supposedly talking to, as I was in an outside file next to a stoner bass drummer.  Afterward Friend came and apologized and told me it was her talking in the ranks.  The band director called me by her name all the time, and in fact I don't think he realized that we were different people until we were in the same band class in our junior year, and as late as 2004 I was still being mistaken for this person even though we graduated in 1976.   

TootsNYC

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I actually had a very similar moment once when a recipe called for a dry sherry, White Dragon. I just assumed it was a special cooking ingredient and browsed around looking for it, then had a "Oh, wait, I bet it means--" moment.

Along these lines, I once had to explain to a guy in the grocery store - and a grocery store employee - what "dry pasta" was.


On our honeymoon, we went into a pub in England. I asked for cider, and the guy asked, "dry or sweet?" What's the difference? I asked. He answered right away, "One of them is dry, and the other . . . . is sweet." Right about that ellipsis, he realize exactly how stupid the question had been.

katycoo

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I actually had a very similar moment once when a recipe called for a dry sherry, White Dragon. I just assumed it was a special cooking ingredient and browsed around looking for it, then had a "Oh, wait, I bet it means--" moment.

Along these lines, I once had to explain to a guy in the grocery store - and a grocery store employee - what "dry pasta" was.


On our honeymoon, we went into a pub in England. I asked for cider, and the guy asked, "dry or sweet?" What's the difference? I asked. He answered right away, "One of them is dry, and the other . . . . is sweet." Right about that ellipsis, he realize exactly how stupid the question had been.

You're lucky the question wasn't, 'sweet, dry or draught'.  I've never actually had the definition of draught explained, but I think it is 'somewhere in the middle'

RingTailedLemur

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My ex, in his mid-twenties, told me off for buying a 2kg bag of dry pasta on a student budget.  He said I'd never be able to eat it all before it expired and shrieked at me in the shop, "well, I hope you can freeze it!".  I just stood there, staring at him with this expression:  :o saying, "but it's dry pasta...".  Idiot!

Flibbertigibbet

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*Aside* - 'draught' just means that it comes from a cask or keg rather than a bottle or can*, so you can have dry or sweet draught cider - it just refers to the method of storage and delivery. Draught is considered 'superior'.

*to confuse things there are now cans which call themselves 'draught'. That's because they have a widget in them which replicates the pressurised storage method of the cask or keg, so is supposed to taste similar.

katycoo

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*Aside* - 'draught' just means that it comes from a cask or keg rather than a bottle or can*, so you can have dry or sweet draught cider - it just refers to the method of storage and delivery. Draught is considered 'superior'.

*to confuse things there are now cans which call themselves 'draught'. That's because they have a widget in them which replicates the pressurised storage method of the cask or keg, so is supposed to taste similar.

Hmm. It is bottled and sold as a third option, separate to sweet or dry.  No widgets in bottles.  Based on your description, I suspect we're both right - that they're all technically draught, but the "plain" draught flavour is between sweet and dry.

nutraxfornerves

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There is another kind of cider--hard. In the US, "cider" is a non-alcoholic juice, usually apple, unless otherwise specified. If you want cider that has been fermented into something alcoholic, you wand "hard cider." (There is a debate as to whether "cider" and "apple juice" are the same thing or not. I once researched it and concluded that the answer is sometimes, sometimes not. Among other things, the distinction appears to be regional.)

Nutrax
The plural of anecdote is not data

cwm

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There is another kind of cider--hard. In the US, "cider" is a non-alcoholic juice, usually apple, unless otherwise specified. If you want cider that has been fermented into something alcoholic, you wand "hard cider." (There is a debate as to whether "cider" and "apple juice" are the same thing or not. I once researched it and concluded that the answer is sometimes, sometimes not. Among other things, the distinction appears to be regional.)

Where I am, apple juice is just the juice of the apple whereas what I think of as cider has extra spices added to it. Usually cinnamon and allspice, sometimes cloves and oranges. Some people call this mulled cider, but it's just cider to me.

Looking it up, in Massachusets, cider is less filtered and has more pulpy material allowed than clarified apple juice. No extra seasonings or spices, just extra thickness.

ladyknight1

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  • Not all those who wander are lost
I am very grateful that hard cider has become commonly available in the US. Gluten free too!

I didn't tell her, but yesterday I saw an older woman wearing a very open shirt, the kind that is designed to have large holes all over it, without wearing a camisole or tank underneath. She had an industrial strength bra in white under a navy blue shirt.
ďAll that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost."
-J.R.R Tolkien

snowflake

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How about: the difference between astrology and astronomy. I was teaching a class about the solar system, and a disturbingly large number of the kids' parents thought, based on the unit name, that we would be learning about gemini and sagittarius and all that. Some rang up to ask why we would be spending so long (4 weeks) on it.

Aaaaaaarrrrrrrrgggggggghhhhhhhhhh!

Had a definitely ex-boyfriend tell me that astronomy and astrology were the same thing, and if I thought otherwise I was deluded.  I wasn't the one who was deluded, pal.

On the other hand, I was in a cute, funky craft shop.  I was admiring some cute charms that could be made into bracelets.  The owner warned me about buying the wrong ones because they were meant to be arranged to compliment one's astrological power.  I looked at her blankly because you know, if it floats your boat, fine.  But I am clueless about that sort of stuff. 

She finally asked me, "Haven't you ever had a reading?" In this voice as if I hadn't ever changed the oil on my car or balanced my checking account. 

I said, "No.  I'll just roll with what comes."

I ended up walking out without buying anything while she was telling me I needed to be prepared for the future and not "walk around in ignorance."  I sort of had this vision of her seeing her psychic the next week and worrying about young people these days who didn't take their lives seriously.  I was offended enough at the time that I had some visions of me walking in wearing a "The End is near" sandwich board and demanding that she take a Bible and raving about Hell.  But happily I got over it in about fifteen minutes.