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Author Topic: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People  (Read 1267965 times)

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katycoo

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There is another kind of cider--hard. In the US, "cider" is a non-alcoholic juice, usually apple, unless otherwise specified. If you want cider that has been fermented into something alcoholic, you wand "hard cider." (There is a debate as to whether "cider" and "apple juice" are the same thing or not. I once researched it and concluded that the answer is sometimes, sometimes not. Among other things, the distinction appears to be regional.)

Ahh yes, I forgot.  Here, cider is all alcoholic.  Non alcoholic is sparkling apple juice.  I've not ever seen it described in the terms I was discussing above.

BB-VA

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There is another kind of cider--hard. In the US, "cider" is a non-alcoholic juice, usually apple, unless otherwise specified. If you want cider that has been fermented into something alcoholic, you wand "hard cider." (There is a debate as to whether "cider" and "apple juice" are the same thing or not. I once researched it and concluded that the answer is sometimes, sometimes not. Among other things, the distinction appears to be regional.)

My husband used to work for a company that made apple products.  They didn't know the difference between cider and juice either.  They avoided the issue by just making juice, leaving the cider to the orchards. 
"The Universe puts us in places where we can learn. They are never easy places, but they are right. Wherever we are, it's the right place and the right time. Pain that sometimes comes is part of the process of constantly being born."
- Delenn to Sheridan: "Babylon 5 - Distant Star"

kareng57

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There is another kind of cider--hard. In the US, "cider" is a non-alcoholic juice, usually apple, unless otherwise specified. If you want cider that has been fermented into something alcoholic, you wand "hard cider." (There is a debate as to whether "cider" and "apple juice" are the same thing or not. I once researched it and concluded that the answer is sometimes, sometimes not. Among other things, the distinction appears to be regional.)

Ahh yes, I forgot.  Here, cider is all alcoholic.  Non alcoholic is sparkling apple juice.  I've not ever seen it described in the terms I was discussing above.


Here - western Canada - it depends.  If you're visiting a seasonal fruit-stand and they offer "cider", it would be non alcoholic.  They'd need a liquour license in order to sell alcoholic cider.

But in grocery stores - it would be labelled "soft cider", since grocery stores here can't sell alcoholic beverages.  For alcoholic fruit cider, you'd need to find a liquour store.

Bluenomi

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I actually had a very similar moment once when a recipe called for a dry sherry, White Dragon. I just assumed it was a special cooking ingredient and browsed around looking for it, then had a "Oh, wait, I bet it means--" moment.

Along these lines, I once had to explain to a guy in the grocery store - and a grocery store employee - what "dry pasta" was.


On our honeymoon, we went into a pub in England. I asked for cider, and the guy asked, "dry or sweet?" What's the difference? I asked. He answered right away, "One of them is dry, and the other . . . . is sweet." Right about that ellipsis, he realize exactly how stupid the question had been.

It's like the difference between sweet and dry wine. Draught according to my cider drinking DH is more beer like, not really dry and not really sweet.

In Aus cider is always alcoholic. Apple juice is still, if it has bubbles it's called sparkling apple juice. It can also be cloudy or clear just to make matters confusing!

Mulled cider is warm with added spices etc just like mulled wine.

MariaE

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There is another kind of cider--hard. In the US, "cider" is a non-alcoholic juice, usually apple, unless otherwise specified. If you want cider that has been fermented into something alcoholic, you wand "hard cider." (There is a debate as to whether "cider" and "apple juice" are the same thing or not. I once researched it and concluded that the answer is sometimes, sometimes not. Among other things, the distinction appears to be regional.)

Ahh yes, I forgot.  Here, cider is all alcoholic.  Non alcoholic is sparkling apple juice.  I've not ever seen it described in the terms I was discussing above.

Same in Denmark. It mighht be as little as 0.5%, but it's always alcoholic.
 
Dane by birth, Kiwi by choice

scotcat60

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In the US, "cider" is a non-alcoholic juice, usually apple, unless otherwise specified.

It's alcoholic in the UK too. i've just been reading a book about World War II. Apparently some GIs were posted to the West Country of England, and were offered cider in the local pub. They said "Na, we wanna man's drink" A few of pints later, unable to walk, they had to be carried out of the pub to recover.

As I understand it cider is femented apple juice.

LTrew

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In the UK clear apple juice is like US apple juice, and nothing is quite like US cider. The closest thing would be the cloudy/pressed apple juice from a local orchard though.  There are some really nice ones, and the ones near me print a guide on every bottle saying what variety of apples they used and how sweet the mix is.
« Last Edit: June 20, 2013, 08:53:19 AM by LTrew »

camlan

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In the UK clear apple juice is like US apple juice, and nothing is quite like US cider. The closest thing would be the cloudy apple juice from a local orchard though.  There are some really nice ones, and the ones near me print a guide on every bottle saying what variety of apples they used and how sweet the mix is.

In general and in most parts of the US, "cider" is apple juice that is cloudy because it hasn't had all the pulp filtered out. Apple "juice" has been filtered. So cider is cloudy, as LTrew says, and juice is clear.

But, in some places apple juice can be cloudy. Some brands of organic juice make a cloudy apple juice.

Cider with any alcohol content is "hard cider."

Apple juice with bubbles added is "sparkling apple juice."

I've yet to encounter "sparkling apple cider," but I'll bet it's out there, somewhere.
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


Carotte

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Cider in France will have alcohol, from not much to a handfull of %.
In Japan however I got caught by surprise, the can only had the word 'apple' and 'cider' in romanji (roman alphabet), the % of alcohol was probably lost in a sea of Japanese, since I wasn't going for a strong beverage I thought, whatever, I like cider and how strong could it be anyway.
Yeah, not just cider, but a vodka based drink >< with something like 9% alcohol content, where I was expecting 2 or 3.

TootsNYC

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My ex, in his mid-twenties, told me off for buying a 2kg bag of dry pasta on a student budget.  He said I'd never be able to eat it all before it expired and shrieked at me in the shop, "well, I hope you can freeze it!".  I just stood there, staring at him with this expression:  :o saying, "but it's dry pasta...".  Idiot!

My now-DH and I invited a coworker & her boyfriend over for dinner, or dessert, or something. DH was living in his parents' old home in a VERY bachelor existence; he went to their new home for dinner nearly every night.

While our guests were there, he opened the fridge and said, "I have some beer in there, but it's been there a few months--I don't know if it's still good."

Dazi

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Snip...

I've yet to encounter "sparkling apple cider," but I'll bet it's out there, somewhere.

Welch's used to make one, but I don't know if they still do...same with Martinelli's.
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Pen^2

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I've yet to encounter "sparkling apple cider," but I'll bet it's out there, somewhere.
We have some in the fridge. I don't know what brand because the writing is in Tamil--there's an English sticker over the ingredients only. It's delicious  ;D

Virg

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TootsNYC wrote:

"While our guests were there, he opened the fridge and said, "I have some beer in there, but it's been there a few months--I don't know if it's still good.""

I'm not sure I'd put this in a thread about what every adult should know.  I don't drink beer and I must admit I never really thought about how long it would take to expire.  Coupled with commercials I've seen where an expiration date on a beer is an advertising point, I'd have to say that his comment isn't far enough away from common sense that he should be derided for it.  In fact, I still don't know if you're commenting on his statement because beer doesn't expire, or because it's virtually certain to have expired in a few months.

Dazi wrote:

"Welch's used to make one, but I don't know if they still do...same with Martinelli's."

We get Martinelli's sparkling cider all the time.  It's available in most grocery stores in the northeastern U.S. at least.

Virg

TootsNYC

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Canned foods in general last for years.

Certainly they don't expire in 3 or 4 months (which was all the older that beer was)--that's the whole point of canning things.

That's the part that was sort of unusual for someone not to know.

(We all know or don't know some stuff.)

WillyNilly

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My now-DH and I invited a coworker & her boyfriend over for dinner, or dessert, or something. DH was living in his parents' old home in a VERY bachelor existence; he went to their new home for dinner nearly every night.

While our guests were there, he opened the fridge and said, "I have some beer in there, but it's been there a few months--I don't know if it's still good."
Canned foods in general last for years.

Certainly they don't expire in 3 or 4 months (which was all the older that beer was)--that's the whole point of canning things.

That's the part that was sort of unusual for someone not to know.

(We all know or don't know some stuff.)

Spoken (written) like a non-beer drinker!
Beer can become "skunked" after several months. It most certainly does not maintain a fresh flavor for years. 2-4 months, probably ok, 8-10 months its going to have an off flavor. You can still drink it, and some people won't mind, but it won't be "good" (as in pleasant) anymore.
« Last Edit: June 20, 2013, 10:33:20 AM by WillyNilly »