Author Topic: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People  (Read 332382 times)

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kherbert05

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When I was a teen, I worked for several summers at a pool.  The area was subject to pop-up thunderstorms that could be pretty fierce.  The area around the poll was also wide open. 

We were always amazed how many visitors had to be almost literally pulled out of the pool and herded into sheltered areas. The classic plaint was, 'Why?  I don't care if it's raining.  I'm already wet'.   
When I was a kid, Mom would drop sis and I off at the swim club for Sis's swim team practice. I want to say 7 am. We would stay there till 4 pm when she would pick us up. All of us kids would plan lunch around the afternoon thunderstorm. The thunder would rumble - we would pour out of the pool and into the snack bar. By the time we got our food and finished eating the storm had usually passed - and the pool was reopened. If it wasn't we helped the life guards and tennis pros with chores inside till it was safe to swim/be on the court.

I do remember a few times when a new lifeguard evacuated the pool for heat lightening (Sky is clear as a bell you can see lightening from distant storms but you can't hear the thunder ) That didn't go over well and William always overrode that decision and reopened the pool.

I love swimming/playing in the rain - if it isn't thundering.
« Last Edit: June 25, 2013, 12:02:28 PM by kherbert05 »
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mandycorn

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When I was a teen, I worked for several summers at a pool.  The area was subject to pop-up thunderstorms that could be pretty fierce.  The area around the poll was also wide open. 

We were always amazed how many visitors had to be almost literally pulled out of the pool and herded into sheltered areas. The classic plaint was, 'Why?  I don't care if it's raining.  I'm already wet'.   

I think part of it is also based on what sort of storms you're used to. My parents grew up in Florida where lightning strikes are common and expected during rain storms, so they raised us to use this type of caution (not in an open area, not in a pool, not taking a shower, etc during a storm) but where I live now, thunder and lightning are so rare that if it's raining, you really can keep swimming because you will just get wetter.
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MrTango

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When I was a teen, I worked for several summers at a pool.  The area was subject to pop-up thunderstorms that could be pretty fierce.  The area around the poll was also wide open. 

We were always amazed how many visitors had to be almost literally pulled out of the pool and herded into sheltered areas. The classic plaint was, 'Why?  I don't care if it's raining.  I'm already wet'.   

I think part of it is also based on what sort of storms you're used to. My parents grew up in Florida where lightning strikes are common and expected during rain storms, so they raised us to use this type of caution (not in an open area, not in a pool, not taking a shower, etc during a storm) but where I live now, thunder and lightning are so rare that if it's raining, you really can keep swimming because you will just get wetter.

Working at a boy scout camp (I was 16), there was one evening when I was assigned the "tower" at the beach.  Essentially, I was assigned to lookout for capsized boats on the lake, keep an eye on the swimmers (in addition to the lifeguards standnig on the dock surrounding the swim area), and keep an eye out for hazardous weather. The tower gave me a perspective 12 feet taller than just standing on the shore.

That evening, I saw a huge thunder head approaching from the opposite side of the lake.  There was no lightning I could see, and no thunder I could hear, but I could tell the rain was going to be dangerously heavy.

I blew my whistle with the signal that meant "everyone out of the water."  Over several minutes, I endured scouts and adult leaders complaining that "it's just a little rain."  About 30 seconds after the last of the complainers and been ushered from the beach (and just as I'd gotten down from the tower and into my rain gear), the gust front hit with 50 mph winds.

I'll admit I took a bit of pleasure at watching those complainers get sandblasted as they scurried away from the beach.

Lynn2000

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I think part of it is also based on what sort of storms you're used to. My parents grew up in Florida where lightning strikes are common and expected during rain storms, so they raised us to use this type of caution (not in an open area, not in a pool, not taking a shower, etc during a storm) but where I live now, thunder and lightning are so rare that if it's raining, you really can keep swimming because you will just get wetter.

Interesting, see, I never heard a rule about not taking a shower during a thunder-and-lightning storm, aka... electrical storm. So that makes sense, it just never occurred to me before.

Maybe I've mentioned this one before... I was once eating lunch with someone who ordered a caramel latte, and was completely incensed to taste it and discover it had coffee in it. Like, horribly shocked, with me sitting there also horribly shocked, trying to figure out if he was joking. In my experience something advertised as a "caramel latte," full stop, is based on coffee, along with milk and caramel. He kept saying, "Latte is milk! It should be just hot milk and caramel!"

Later, at a Korean frozen yogurt shop, I saw them advertising lattes, and they explicitly said on the sign that theirs do NOT involve coffee, just milk and caramel for a "caramel latte." So apparently such things exist in the world, but, as this guy had the same ethnic and geographic background as me (and same age), I'm just kind of boggled that his default would be to expect no coffee, and to be completely unaware that coffee in a latte was even a done thing. While confidently ordering a latte--it'd be different if *I* had ordered it and he had taken a sip and been surprised, because he really had no idea/never thought about it before.

Now when I had to explain to my mom that a "chai latte" might be coffee-based (bad) but a "chai tea latte" should be tea-based (good), I understood, because that's kind of a subtle distinction in the name when most of the words seem foreign to you anyway, and coffee shops have only been a big thing for a small part of your existence.
~Lynn2000

BarensMom

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(snip)

Now when I had to explain to my mom that a "chai latte" might be coffee-based (bad) but a "chai tea latte" should be tea-based (good), I understood, because that's kind of a subtle distinction in the name when most of the words seem foreign to you anyway, and coffee shops have only been a big thing for a small part of your existence.

So that's why the SB baristas always repeat back my order as a "chai tea latte."  I thought stringing "chai" and "tea" was a bit repetitive, but now I know it's to confirm that I don't want coffee (nasty stuff, that) in my chai "tea" latte.

kherbert05

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I think part of it is also based on what sort of storms you're used to. My parents grew up in Florida where lightning strikes are common and expected during rain storms, so they raised us to use this type of caution (not in an open area, not in a pool, not taking a shower, etc during a storm) but where I live now, thunder and lightning are so rare that if it's raining, you really can keep swimming because you will just get wetter.

Interesting, see, I never heard a rule about not taking a shower during a thunder-and-lightning storm, aka... electrical storm. So that makes sense, it just never occurred to me before.

We don't take baths/showers (metal pipes + water + electricity = trouble), unplug the TV, modem, computer, always have a battery powered radio with back up batteries and turn off the AC. I tend to just go to bed or read a book during thunderstorms. My current pool has a building on 2.5 sides and a brick wall on the other 1.5 side. It feels quiet closterphobic. The reason is security. They are making it as difficult as possible for someone to sneak in after hours. That does mean that during a fire/fire drill the people at the pool have to go inside the potentially burning building to get out.


The no water in a storm thing is 2 fold for me 1) water and electricity don't mix 2) I grew up on Texas beaches, rivers and lakes. In open water you are the tallest thing around. Even the pools I went to as a kids tended to be in very open areas. The default was that people would want to sun themselves and not having structure that could block the lifeguard's views. 2 of them also overlooked the golf course.


 A heavy rain without thunder and lightening freak me out. The two times I had a tornado dance around the building I was in had those conditions heavy rain, wind no thunder. The one ti
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camlan

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I live in the middle of Florida and hurricane season is in sway as I type. All county and city governments offer clinics to help people prepare for these storms, the local hardware/home stores offer classes and kits of supplies.

Still, there is always nearly 1/3 of the people who live here (not tourists) who will have no food, batteries, candles, manual can openers, pet supplies, drinking water,  first aid kit, hygiene water, or store of their medication.

Hurricanes always give at least 8 hours of notice of their arrival as long as you pay attention to the local news or radio station.

Here in New England, we get even more warning--because we've been watching the storm hit Florida or some other southern state, unfortunately, and then move on up the coast. We still have people running to the store for batteries, bread and milk hours before the storm hits. And running to the beach to watch the storm surge.

It's not like tornadoes, which seem to be able to pop up at random and follow an erratic course. The weather people are pretty good at spotting hurricanes and tracking them these days.
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


Thipu1

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This is a bit on the 'brain-hurt' side but since we're discussing storms...

At work, we were talking about thunderstorms.   A woman who had lived in a low-rise neighborhood of Brooklyn for decades was amazed to learn that there was a way of determining how far away a storm was. 

You all know it.  You see lightning and then begin to count, one-thousand, two-thousand etc until you hear the thunder.   It isn't infallible but it gives you a rough idea how far away the lightning is. 

'That's all well and good,' she said.  'but it doesn't tell you from what direction the storm is coming'. 
 ???  :-\  :o

You can see the lightning.  Doesn't that tell you from which direction the storm is coming? 

Tea Drinker

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If she'd said "doesn't tell you which way the storm is moving," I'd see her point. When I lived in New York, I'd sometimes be walking home, see a flash off to the west, and count seconds. That would tell me how far away the storm is, and after a few thunderclaps I would have an idea of whether it was getting generally closer to me, but that didn't tell me whether the storm was actually approaching:  a storm to my southwest that is moving due north is coming closer, but it's not going to rain on me.

(I haven't sorted out the weather patterns in my new home yet; it doesn't help that the most impressive rainstorm since I got here came from the "wrong" direction in terms of usual/prevailing conditions.)
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ladyknight1

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We can usually tell the way the storm is moving, but we have had a few that covered our city (which is pretty sprawled out) and we could see lightning all around the edges. That is a tough one to call.

A.P. Wulfric

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One a food note, this happened yesterday-

It was the last day of school, so like many kids, a few teachers also went to a pool party to celebrate. One teacher (male-for the record) lit the grill and proceeded to answer questions from another male teacher.  (Gender doesn't really matter, it just is part of the story telling).    Both teachers are in their 30s/40s, and teacher 2 is notorious for his love of takeout.

Conversation:
Pete: So, when you are cooking hot dogs, when do you marinate them?
Ken:  Um...you usually don't marinate hot dogs.
Pete: You don't???  Huh.  How about hamburgers then?
Ken: I don't usually marinate those either...do you?
Pete:  Never made either.  Don't know how to.
Ken: Oh, well you just..(explains about heating and cook time and such.)
Pete: What about the cheese?
Ken: That goes on at the end, just to get it melted for a bit.
Pete: Where does it come from?
Ken: A package?
Pete: Wait wait. You buy cheese!
Ken: Pete-do you ever grocery shopping?
Pete: No!  DD for breakfast, school or take out lunch, take out or restaurant dinner!

Pete is an awesome guy, but most of the rest of us were dying at the convo. Pete takes it though-he knows his views on cooking are a bit extreme, and it was cute that he was interested. I think he might just try it some time. :)

RegionMom

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I assume DD is Dunkin Donuts and not the the e hell version of DD!
 :o
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ladyknight1

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It makes so much more sense now. I was thinking his DD made him breakfast every day.  ;)

Pen^2

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I'm more amused by the "you buy cheese" comment.

Surely, someone who has no idea how people cook food, would assume you have to buy at least most things. We don't all have farms in our backyards, right? Did he think you buy meats, but not other things like cheese, or vegetables? Has he never been in another person's house ever and failed to notice the lack of a cornfield? Not knowing is one thing, but this guy seems to have made a few very strange assumptions that would clash with reality every single day.

It hurts my brain trying to get inside this guy's point of view.

PastryGoddess

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I'm more amused by the "you buy cheese" comment.

Surely, someone who has no idea how people cook food, would assume you have to buy at least most things. We don't all have farms in our backyards, right? Did he think you buy meats, but not other things like cheese, or vegetables? Has he never been in another person's house ever and failed to notice the lack of a cornfield? Not knowing is one thing, but this guy seems to have made a few very strange assumptions that would clash with reality every single day.

It hurts my brain trying to get inside this guy's point of view.

You would be surprised.  I know that I am still capable of not knowing something, simply because I don't NEED to know.  I lived in my house for 3 years before I knew that my next door neighbor had a kid (next door in that our houses are attached).  I didn't know the basics about car maintenance until I brought a junker and was forced to learn.  I couldn't afford to take it to the dealer every single time something came up.

I mean once something is brought I'm I'm like "doh!", but I know there are things that I probably should know but I'm not very interested in learning because it would take time away from other things.