Author Topic: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People  (Read 291988 times)

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Twik

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I must admit - certain places that I've seen mostly on television/movies seem to take a slightly unreal state in my mind. Places like NY, LA and Paris, after a while, seem to exist more as literary devices than real locales.

I remember when I started travelling for work, and had my first trip to Phoenix. Phoenix was "real" to me - but I was startled to see a road sign pointing to Los Angeles. I mean, you could actually just take that exit and *drive* there - it was as if I suddenly saw a turnoff to the Emerald City.

Brooklyn - let's just say that Brooklyn blew my mind, as if I was suddenly transported to a 1940s b/w movie.
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wheeitsme

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<snip>

One of the best/worst had to be what started as a cheerful, 'Where are you good folks from?' exchange.  When we proudly said that we were from Brooklyn, the lady grasped her purse to her chest with both hands and backed away very, very slowly.     


Must have been Giants fans.   ;)

nutraxfornerves

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About 30 years ago, my employer sent me on a 6-month assignment that required me to move from California to Maryland. Since it was temporary, I didn't do anything about my car registration. I also spent most weekends exploring.

One weekend my car, with its California license plates, broke down in a very isolated part of West Virginia. Eventually, it turned into a wonderful experience, as all sorts of people helped me out & extended hospitality. The most hospitable person confessed that he drove by me & my broken down car several times as he was worried about the California plates--maybe I was a real weirdo. He finally decided that I looked OK. But he admitted he was quite surprised that I did not talk like a stereotypical Valley Girl.


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Lady Snowdon

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Growing up in Colorado, people from other areas would ask us weird questions all the time.  A couple in a grocery store wanted to know where the "general store" was, and acted very disappointed when I told them that the only "general store" I knew of just sold tourist junk.  Everyone I know shops at grocery stores and department stores, just like everywhere else.  A few people asked where the gold was.  Not gold mines, just "Where's all the gold?".  Even during the Colorado gold rush, I don't think you'd have been able to just walk into town and pick gold up off the streets.  One guy and his wife ended up getting mad at each other when he said it was a shame there were no buffalo around town and his wife said it was a shame that cattle were allowed to live so close to town! 

In addition - I didn't grow up on a ranch, I have never owned a horse, almost nobody in my family hunts and we have all the modern conveniences like running water, electricity, cars and a/c. 

afbluebelle

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Growing up in Colorado, people from other areas would ask us weird questions all the time.  A couple in a grocery store wanted to know where the "general store" was, and acted very disappointed when I told them that the only "general store" I knew of just sold tourist junk.  Everyone I know shops at grocery stores and department stores, just like everywhere else.  A few people asked where the gold was.  Not gold mines, just "Where's all the gold?".  Even during the Colorado gold rush, I don't think you'd have been able to just walk into town and pick gold up off the streets.  One guy and his wife ended up getting mad at each other when he said it was a shame there were no buffalo around town and his wife said it was a shame that cattle were allowed to live so close to town! 

In addition - I didn't grow up on a ranch, I have never owned a horse, almost nobody in my family hunts and we have all the modern conveniences like running water, electricity, cars and a/c.

All those stereotypes did apply to me most of my life in CO, except that we did have running water, electricity, and cars. No AC though.
My inner (r-word) is having a field day with this one.
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Lady Snowdon

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Growing up in Colorado, people from other areas would ask us weird questions all the time.  A couple in a grocery store wanted to know where the "general store" was, and acted very disappointed when I told them that the only "general store" I knew of just sold tourist junk.  Everyone I know shops at grocery stores and department stores, just like everywhere else.  A few people asked where the gold was.  Not gold mines, just "Where's all the gold?".  Even during the Colorado gold rush, I don't think you'd have been able to just walk into town and pick gold up off the streets.  One guy and his wife ended up getting mad at each other when he said it was a shame there were no buffalo around town and his wife said it was a shame that cattle were allowed to live so close to town! 

In addition - I didn't grow up on a ranch, I have never owned a horse, almost nobody in my family hunts and we have all the modern conveniences like running water, electricity, cars and a/c.

All those stereotypes did apply to me most of my life in CO, except that we did have running water, electricity, and cars. No AC though.

Yeah, my cousins grew up on a ranch, own horses, my aunt raises chickens and ducks for eggs and meat and a few years ago they raised bison for a year to sell for slaughter.  Nothing like having your teenage cousin yelling "BISON!  Come get your food!" and then explaining to me that the bison don't have names so it'll be less personal when they die.  And my parents only put in AC about three years ago...

katycoo

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My coworker told me this one today.

She was talking to a woman in her mid 30s who had only just learned that pickles are made out of...cucumbers.

I can actually see people not realising this simply because they don't think about it. Also, every other pickled vegetable retains its original name.

kareng57

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My coworker told me this one today.

She was talking to a woman in her mid 30s who had only just learned that pickles are made out of...cucumbers.

I can actually see people not realising this simply because they don't think about it. Also, every other pickled vegetable retains its original name.


I too agree with this; I would not call it "silly".

Bijou

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Sign on my mother's sewing machine.

"DON'T TIE STRAWBERRIES ON THE SEWING MACHINE!"

Strawberries, as in salmon eggs that are tied up in little squares of a fine red net. 

I guess the boys who were probably teenagers at the time, used her sewing machine as a work surface.   >:(
I've never knitted anything I could recognize when it was finished.  Actually, I've never finished anything, much to my family's relief.

nutraxfornerves

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I once had an adult confess to me that he had just learned that cotton comes from a plant. That's not too surprising; lots of people think it's synthetic.

What made this confession odd, was that he had spotted some plants with fluffy white pods all over them in a greenhouse & asked what they were. The greenhouse belonged to his employer, the state department of agriculture. He had worked for them for several years, during which time he had visited many farms, had probably driven by many a cotton field, and surely must have heard people talking about boll weevils.

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gramma dishes

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My daughter didn't realize until she was in college that Alaska wasn't an island. 

In her school they used pull down maps rather than globes and they would have a picture of the continental United States with a little box at the upper left showing Alaska and a little box at the bottom left showing Hawaii.  Since she knew Hawaii was a group of islands and was therefore separated from the land mass of the rest of the U.S., she had always assumed that Alaska was one too and that's why it wasn't shown 'connected' to the rest of the U.S. 

Belle

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My daughter didn't realize until she was in college that Alaska wasn't an island. 

In her school they used pull down maps rather than globes and they would have a picture of the continental United States with a little box at the upper left showing Alaska and a little box at the bottom left showing Hawaii.  Since she knew Hawaii was a group of islands and was therefore separated from the land mass of the rest of the U.S., she had always assumed that Alaska was one too and that's why it wasn't shown 'connected' to the rest of the U.S.

This probably belongs in the "obvious things you've just learned thread" since I'm admitting to my own ignorance, but it's related to the story above. I just learned last week that North Korea and South Korea are on the northeast side of China, right near Japan. I always thought they were southwest of China, far away from Japan (sort of in the area of Thailand). I would have bet money on it, but I was very wrong.

I've looked at maps of Asia plenty of times, so it took me awhile to figure out where I had gotten the idea that N & S Korea were southwest of China. Whenever you see a map of Korea (e.g., in the paper, on the news), it focuses in on the two countries and shows that North Korea shares a northern border with China. It's not until you zoom way out that you realize that, although North Korea borders China on the North, it's still on the far northeast side of China. And some of the larger maps of Asia I saw only labeled one or two countries (e.g., usually China and one or two others, at most), so my incorrect belief wasn't corrected when I saw the larger maps. Now I know - zoom out if you want to know where something is, zoom out!

kherbert05

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My daughter didn't realize until she was in college that Alaska wasn't an island. 

In her school they used pull down maps rather than globes and they would have a picture of the continental United States with a little box at the upper left showing Alaska and a little box at the bottom left showing Hawaii.  Since she knew Hawaii was a group of islands and was therefore separated from the land mass of the rest of the U.S., she had always assumed that Alaska was one too and that's why it wasn't shown 'connected' to the rest of the U.S. 
This is why I have a US Map and a World Map posted side by side in my classroom. One of the workstations I do is have QR codes  that link to earth/life science videos on the wall. I use string to link from the QR code to the location on the map. If it is a US Video the QR code I run the string to both  maps. Sometime around November a kid asks why Alaska is next to Hawaii on the US map and by Canada on the World Map.
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Luci

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My daughter didn't realize until she was in college that Alaska wasn't an island. 

In her school they used pull down maps rather than globes and they would have a picture of the continental United States with a little box at the upper left showing Alaska and a little box at the bottom left showing Hawaii.  Since she knew Hawaii was a group of islands and was therefore separated from the land mass of the rest of the U.S., she had always assumed that Alaska was one too and that's why it wasn't shown 'connected' to the rest of the U.S. 
This is why I have a US Map and a World Map posted side by side in my classroom. One of the workstations I do is have QR codes  that link to earth/life science videos on the wall. I use string to link from the QR code to the location on the map. If it is a US Video the QR code I run the string to both  maps. Sometime around November a kid asks why Alaska is next to Hawaii on the US map and by Canada on the World Map.

What is a QR code? I can't find it in a search. Thanks.

RingTailedLemur

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