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Author Topic: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People  (Read 1214397 times)

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Kaymyth

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2145 on: February 06, 2014, 03:10:32 PM »
Some time ago, myself and a few other people had to convince an acquaintance that no, reindeer are not mythical.  It's just the *flying* that's mythical.

Katana_Geldar

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2146 on: February 06, 2014, 03:22:15 PM »
I had to tell a fellow student that it was standard procedure for a professor to mark down points for misspelled words and terms. She was astonished at the concept.

I can sort of imagine that by university (which I associate with professors), the professors would be "beyond" marking and taking points off for misspellings/typos, in the sense that they're looking at the bigger picture of concepts, citations, etc.. But I think that is predicated on the fact that by university, the students should be beyond making such simple errors on an assignment they turn in. So if a professor took the time to mark the single typo in my ten-page essay, I would find that kind of odd, though honestly I would be more irritated at myself for leaving it in. However, if a paper was riddled with typos and mistakes, or had repeated misuse of an important term, that seems like cause for losing points.

I had a beginning-level archaeologist class, for example, where in my first paper I kept using the term "pot shards" when in fact, archaeologists say and spell it "pot sherds." Since it means "broken pieces of pottery," I was likening it to broken shards of glass, and the two words are so similar in sound and spelling--I thought it was a mix of me hearing it incorrectly, and maybe a British spelling, like color vs. colour, which I wasn't obligated to use. Yup, the professor marked every incorrect instance (and was right to do so), though I don't remember him taking off points for it. I got my paper back and thought, "Oh, this is a real thing after all."

Another time, as a graduate student when I really should have known better, I turned in a long term paper in which I had done the in-text citations wrong. If there are multiple authors on a paper--for example, Bob Smith, Sue Jones, and Amy Miller, in that order--in-text you often shorten the citation to "Smith et al." with the "et al." being an abbreviation for "et alii" which in Latin means "and others" (yes, I had to look that up just now). The point is, "et" is a complete word, but "al" is an abbreviation and needs a period after it. I had done all the citations as "et. al" getting it backwards. ::facepalm:: And the truth is, I wasn't 100% certain as I was writing it, I was just too lazy to double-check. And this professor dutifully marked every single instance. Again, I don't think he actually took off points, but it was rather humbling to see the red marks all over my entire paper.
My Australian history lecture told us once of a girl doing an honours thesis about John Curtin, Prime Minister during WWII. She spelled his name "curtain" every single time in her thesis. We joked she left him hanging there.

Psychopoesie

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2147 on: February 06, 2014, 03:24:14 PM »
Quote
The people of Wells
Have a cathedral all to theirsel's;
But of their bishop they have to give half
To "Barf".

 That definitely does not work in most American accents, which are rhotic (that is, the letter R is always pronounced.)  So "Barf" is not going to come out as "Bahf" (a non standard pronunciation of the city of Bath), but rather as "barrf" (to vomit).

Apologies -- the business of "rhotic you, non-rhotic us" -- which I know in theory, but tend to forget in practice, especially in the heat of posting. I should have spelt it "Bahf".

Funny. Works in Oz accent. Plus the word barf as in to vomit also gets pronounced bahf. Adding more r's barrf just makes it sound a bit like a sheep bleating when I say it. So nutraxfornerves second sentence gave me the giggles. Knew what was meant but so hard to convey pronunciation in text.  :)

Katana_Geldar

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2148 on: February 06, 2014, 03:30:03 PM »
Be careful of babies with the Bishop of Bath and Wells. ;)

Elfmama

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2149 on: February 06, 2014, 03:39:10 PM »
What's the difference between a catherdral and a basilica? I've been to St. Patrick's Cathedral in Manhatten and  to the "Cathedral Basilica of St. Augustine" in Florida, among others.

I think I finally gleaned that the basilica is so designated by the Pope, but in the long run all I end up with a lovely ornate Catholic church that I visit for the beauty and leave with a feeling of awe.
DH says that a church can be a basilica without being a cathedral.  That it is designated by the Pope as having certain ecclesiastical privileges, and frequently IS a cathedral, but doesn't need to be.  Usually it has some sort of cultural or historical background. 
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Slartibartfast

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2150 on: February 06, 2014, 04:48:11 PM »
I was the silly one today  ::)  I've been writing this afternoon.  Really on a roll, which is nice.  And then realized that the reason my character had just spent four unnecessary paragraphs rhapsodizing over the smell of the chicken and dumplings she was making was because, in fact, I'm starving because I forgot to eat lunch.  Or breakfast.

So now I get to go eat (gonna grab something quick and then take the time to make homemade chicken and dumplings, I guess!) and then go edit out a bunch of food musings which were taking over my nice romantic scene  :P

Jocelyn

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2151 on: February 06, 2014, 09:03:29 PM »
What's the difference between a catherdral and a basilica? I've been to St. Patrick's Cathedral in Manhatten and  to the "Cathedral Basilica of St. Augustine" in Florida, among others.

I think I finally gleaned that the basilica is so designated by the Pope, but in the long run all I end up with a lovely ornate Catholic church that I visit for the beauty and leave with a feeling of awe.
DH says that a church can be a basilica without being a cathedral.  That it is designated by the Pope as having certain ecclesiastical privileges, and frequently IS a cathedral, but doesn't need to be.  Usually it has some sort of cultural or historical background.
A monastery may have its chapel designated as a basilica: Conception Abbey in Conception MO, which is home to a seminary as well, has a basilica. Visit their web site, it's worth the trip. ;)

greencat

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2152 on: February 06, 2014, 09:22:41 PM »
This is a thing an adult should really know about himself: that he is a poor speller, and if a word processor is not highlighting spelling errors as he types, then perhaps that particular program does not do the little red squiggly lines. 

"im" is not an acceptable substitute for "I'm" in written English.  Proper nouns should be capitalized. There is a difference between you're and your, and they're/their/there.  Commas should separate independent clauses.

I blame the schools and college he attended for not bothering to actually teach him how to spell, capitalize, and punctuate, and instead allowing him to rely on a computer to do all those tasks.

Library Dragon

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2153 on: February 07, 2014, 12:23:25 AM »
What's the difference between a catherdral and a basilica? I've been to St. Patrick's Cathedral in Manhatten and  to the "Cathedral Basilica of St. Augustine" in Florida, among others.

I think I finally gleaned that the basilica is so designated by the Pope, but in the long run all I end up with a lovely ornate Catholic church that I visit for the beauty and leave with a feeling of awe.

As others have mentioned for Catholics a Cathedral is the official church of a bishop. His seat (cathedra).

A basilica must “stand out as a center of active and pastoral liturgy,” according to the 1989 Vatican document Domus ecclesiae. You're right, the designation comes from the Pope.

What gets confusing is that a basilica isn't always a cathedral. In Rome/Vatican City St. Peter's is a basilica, but the cathedral is St. John Lateran. The Pope is the Bishop of Rome and when acting solely in that capacity does so from St. John Lateran.

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CakeEater

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2154 on: February 07, 2014, 01:40:42 AM »
This is a thing an adult should really know about himself: that he is a poor speller, and if a word processor is not highlighting spelling errors as he types, then perhaps that particular program does not do the little red squiggly lines. 

"im" is not an acceptable substitute for "I'm" in written English.  Proper nouns should be capitalized. There is a difference between you're and your, and they're/their/there.  Commas should separate independent clauses.

I blame the schools and college he attended for not bothering to actually teach him how to spell, capitalize, and punctuate, and instead allowing him to rely on a computer to do all those tasks.

Someone who is in college has been at school for at least 13 years? I have difficulty believing that not one teacher in all that time mentioned capital letters.

greencat

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2155 on: February 07, 2014, 01:59:21 AM »
This is a thing an adult should really know about himself: that he is a poor speller, and if a word processor is not highlighting spelling errors as he types, then perhaps that particular program does not do the little red squiggly lines. 

"im" is not an acceptable substitute for "I'm" in written English.  Proper nouns should be capitalized. There is a difference between you're and your, and they're/their/there.  Commas should separate independent clauses.

I blame the schools and college he attended for not bothering to actually teach him how to spell, capitalize, and punctuate, and instead allowing him to rely on a computer to do all those tasks.

Someone who is in college has been at school for at least 13 years? I have difficulty believing that not one teacher in all that time mentioned capital letters.

He has a 2-year college degree and is working on his 4-year.  He's incredibly intelligent, to the point where he was able to graduate high school early, and has an impressive vocabulary, but trying to read his writing without the word processor auto-correcting, or at least flagging, errors is impossible.  I suspect he hasn't had to check for errors on his own since elementary school.

Twik

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2156 on: February 07, 2014, 09:28:24 AM »
Teachers are under a lot of pressure to be "tolerant of different means of self-expression." This means, sometimes, not criticizing students for grammar, spelling, illegible handwriting, or other examples of non-conformity.

I can agree with this, to a point. I would hate to see a student pour out his/her heart in impassioned, and well-reasoned, prose, only to have it returned with "You split your infinitives - C+". On the other hand, it is a disservice to students who will have to write professionally not to teach them how to write in an accepted format. Unfortunately, a lot of graduates hit the working world with the attitude "as long as you know what I meant, it's fine."
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GlitterIsMyDrug

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2157 on: February 07, 2014, 10:10:55 AM »
Teachers are under a lot of pressure to be "tolerant of different means of self-expression." This means, sometimes, not criticizing students for grammar, spelling, illegible handwriting, or other examples of non-conformity.

I can agree with this, to a point. I would hate to see a student pour out his/her heart in impassioned, and well-reasoned, prose, only to have it returned with "You split your infinitives - C+". On the other hand, it is a disservice to students who will have to write professionally not to teach them how to write in an accepted format. Unfortunately, a lot of graduates hit the working world with the attitude "as long as you know what I meant, it's fine."

Isn't there a happy medium? I'm pretty bad at spelling. And my grammar is pretty wonky. And lots not even start on my handwriting ok? But I've always loved to write and I'm pretty good writer. My teachers wouldn't mark me down terribly for spelling or grammar but rather give me tools to help me. Like insisting we always have someone proof read our work (by the way, it's always been my best friend, her writing isn't the best and dang can she spell and she's pretty good with grammar too. She's been proofing my work since grade school), or telling me to slow down, look words up, ect. And I'd get the same with my handwriting, just slow down a little. It's still not great, but it is legible and neat.

I'm not a teacher, nor do I play one on TV (which is good, because they're all twerking with students, or sleeping with students, really TV teachers have gotten quite terrible), but I'd want my pretend child to be able to formulate a decent sentence and also express themselves. I'm pretty sure they aren't mutually exclusive.

Though I did once have a boss who while checking her step-daughters homework, lost it over it being "sloppy" (didn't look too bad to me) and erased everything she'd done and made her re-do it. It was math homework and I guess her numbers were "sloppy", she really tore the poor girl down. So I could see it getting out of hand. Of course boss lady was not a nice person in general. There's an encouraging way to give criticism and a discouraging way. She was all about the discouraging way.

Carotte

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2158 on: February 07, 2014, 02:14:12 PM »
I had barely (and mis)diagnosed dyslexia (and undiagnosed disortographia) in school. In middle and high-school I remember non-language teachers marking my mistakes but not correcting them, it would have taken them wayyy too long.
I don't remember with which frequency they would dock point, I'd like to think it was quite clear I had a learning disability and wasn't just not paying attention, but it did happen and I understood why.

I'm not sure any learning disability can explain the "i" vs "I" or not using a capital and a period to start/end a phrase, that's laziness. (ok, there must be some, but by that level of disability the teacher should know or there should be some kind of help put in place, I'm talking regular track students).
It's different from they/there/their where there can at least be a problem between phonetic and graphic input/output.

Margo

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2159 on: February 07, 2014, 02:35:58 PM »
A University wasn't a requirement for City status in England,  just a cathedral.(or, more specifically, a Bishop).  Which is why Wells, in Somerset, is a city, despite being a small market town.

I *think* that a Royal Charter is required to create a city so the criteria doesn't apply any longer.

Yeah, I knew the cathedral was a definite. As you say, it's all done by Royal charter now.

Aren't both Oxford and Cambridge cities without cathedrals?  I'm guessing their city status has something to do with royalty attending the universities.

Cambridge is cathedral-less: the area's cathedral and bishop are located some fifteen miles down the road, at Ely. I'd figure that Cambridge's city status is, in one way or another, an exception derived from the place's being the site "since forever", of a prestigious university.

Oxford has a bishop, and a cathedral -- said cathedral being within -- and the place of worship serving -- Oxford University's Christ Church College.  All Oxford and Cambridge colleges, except maybe some of the newest ones, have in-built chapels, in which services of worship take place.  Christ Church College, Oxford, has a centuries-old reputation for being the university's most insufferably snooty-and-snobby college -- it's where the gilded and supercilious scions of the aristocracy have long gone for their studies: students at Christ Church have long taken it for granted that they are "the People, and the Only People" -- proles at other colleges, are beneath contempt. (OK, a bit of exaggeration and cherished-Oxford-myth stuff there.)  Thus, Christ Church bods have long been fond of saying: "you low-lifes have mere chapels in your colleges. We've got a cathedral."

Yes, Oxford has a cathedral. Cambridge only officially became a city in 1951 :-)