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Author Topic: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People  (Read 1569081 times)

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Katana_Geldar

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2235 on: February 14, 2014, 10:57:54 PM »
A male barista is not a barrister.

aren't they called baristas, regardless of gender?

LOL..barrister?  :D

They are court advocates in England. Oh and they still wear wigs.
And Australia. And South Africa and quite a few other countries.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barrister

Think of it like a lawyer where the profession is split between barrister and solicitor. Barristers go to court, solicitors don't.

katycoo

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2236 on: February 15, 2014, 01:29:47 AM »
A male barista is not a barrister.

aren't they called baristas, regardless of gender?

LOL..barrister?  :D

They are court advocates in England. Oh and they still wear wigs.
And Australia. And South Africa and quite a few other countries.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barrister

Think of it like a lawyer where the profession is split between barrister and solicitor. Barristers go to court, solicitors don't.

Ahem, incorrect.  I am an Australian solicitor and I appear in Court fequently. 

Barristers tend to do more advocacy work, and are generally not instructed directly by a client, but rather through a solicitor.  Barristers often provide specialist advice, and draft or settle complex documents, and mostly solicitors do the more basic legwork when they are working together.  It's a difficult disctinction to define, but technically there's little a barrister can do that I can't - they're just more likely to have particular skills, and therefore do it better.  BUt its not like I'm not allowed to.

kherbert05

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2237 on: February 15, 2014, 06:51:51 AM »
Back on topic: I had another argument with an adult who was insisting AD means After Death, not Anno Domini, except she was insisting that "Anno Domini" is latin for "After Death".

I've heard that one a lot. I think it's a pretty common misconception, which at least kind of makes sense... same initials, translation fuzziness, etc.. BC = Before Christ, AD must be some kind of "After Christ," right?

What gets me is when people argue/insist that they're right, instead of saying, "Really? I always thought X. Is that not so? Can we look it up?"

I remmeber being taught thi is a semi-kind of way.

We were taught that AD means Anno Domini etc etc, and that lots of people use the words "After Death" as a way to remember the time reference.  We were expressly taught that the AD date marker didn't match up with the supposed date of death because the 33 years of Jesus life causes a hiccup, but that it was nearish enough to use as a rough guide.
Still doesn't make sense to my brain. I was told BC marked the time before the supposed birth of Jesus and AD marked the time after the supposed birth of Jesus. To me that is more accurate and easy to understand.


OK it  usually led to me arguing what about people in cultures not dominated by Christian faith why should their calendar be dominated by not their religion. Then in 10th the teacher pointed out that many of the months and days take their names from early Greek/Roman religion and no-one is complaining about that.


Which brings up an interesting question. In countries with cultures (China, Japan and Israel are the three that pop to mind) that have other ways of numbering the years/different New Years do they use their traditional way and convert like with time zones when dealing with the west, or do they use the Gregorian Calendar?
Don't Teach Them For Your Past. Teach Them For Their Future

Thipu1

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2238 on: February 15, 2014, 07:56:05 AM »
I've seen Chinese and Saudi calendars that combine the two systems.  These had the Western terminology in English and the local terms in Chinese or Arabic.   

jaxsue

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2239 on: February 15, 2014, 10:31:22 AM »
A male barista is not a barrister.

aren't they called baristas, regardless of gender?

LOL..barrister?  :D

They are court advocates in England. Oh and they still wear wigs.

Yes, I know that. I read a lot of british books and my family is very british-y.  :)
« Last Edit: February 15, 2014, 10:33:06 AM by jaxsue »

NyaChan

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2240 on: February 15, 2014, 10:56:11 AM »
I've seen Chinese and Saudi calendars that combine the two systems.  These had the Western terminology in English and the local terms in Chinese or Arabic.

Yeah my calendar combines the gregorian calendar with the Hijra calendar.

Lynn2000

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2241 on: February 15, 2014, 01:19:08 PM »
As a kid I remember reading a book about a modern Jewish girl who is transported back in time to WWII, and when she asks someone what year it is, they say something like, "3023," and she's like, "WHAT? It can't be the future!" But the person she was talking to was using the Jewish year numbering system, which apparently was no longer common in her era. I think that was the first time it occurred to me that different groups could have different dating systems.
~Lynn2000

violinp

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2242 on: February 15, 2014, 01:20:45 PM »
As a kid I remember reading a book about a modern Jewish girl who is transported back in time to WWII, and when she asks someone what year it is, they say something like, "3023," and she's like, "WHAT? It can't be the future!" But the person she was talking to was using the Jewish year numbering system, which apparently was no longer common in her era. I think that was the first time it occurred to me that different groups could have different dating systems.

The Devil's Arithmetic by Jane Yolen?
"It takes a great deal of courage to stand up to your enemies, but even more to stand up to your friends" - Harry Potter


Lynn2000

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2243 on: February 15, 2014, 01:28:05 PM »
As a kid I remember reading a book about a modern Jewish girl who is transported back in time to WWII, and when she asks someone what year it is, they say something like, "3023," and she's like, "WHAT? It can't be the future!" But the person she was talking to was using the Jewish year numbering system, which apparently was no longer common in her era. I think that was the first time it occurred to me that different groups could have different dating systems.

The Devil's Arithmetic by Jane Yolen?

I think you're right! :)
~Lynn2000

Library Dragon

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2244 on: February 15, 2014, 01:56:50 PM »
Great book!

When I was a kid I couldn't figure out why people didn't realize that Jesus was the Messiah. After all the years had been counting down until his birth.  ::)

Quit laughing!  ;)

It made so much more sense when I learned that there were multiple calendar systems. 

When I did teacher training on the Holocaust I've been chastised for using CE and BCE by one teacher. I thought it only polite given the topic. I was also surprised at the number of history teachers not familiar with the phrase Common Era.

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kherbert05

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2245 on: February 15, 2014, 02:23:28 PM »
As a kid I remember reading a book about a modern Jewish girl who is transported back in time to WWII, and when she asks someone what year it is, they say something like, "3023," and she's like, "WHAT? It can't be the future!" But the person she was talking to was using the Jewish year numbering system, which apparently was no longer common in her era. I think that was the first time it occurred to me that different groups could have different dating systems.
Devil's Arithmetic - used to be on the 5th grade novel list. Had the distinction of being 1 of 3 books on the list that didn't kill off the main character. The others were Bridge to Terabithia, and Johnny Tremain. Yes Devil's Arithmetic, Bridge to Terabithia and Johnny Tremain were the "Happy books" in 5th grade. Several years of protesting when nowhere - till the district switched from Novel lists to leveled books/novels.
Don't Teach Them For Your Past. Teach Them For Their Future

cabbageweevil

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2246 on: February 15, 2014, 02:30:33 PM »
Brought to mind, the IMO splendid time-travel novel “Household Gods” by Harry Turtledove and Judith Tarr. On the “beware of what you wish for – you may get it” theme.  American professional lady circa 2000 AD, feeling bedevilled and harried by her assorted “First World problems”, dreams of how much better and simpler life would have been in Roman times. She is magically transported into those times – in the 2nd century AD, in a place on the far northern fringe of the Roman Empire – is given the magical ability to understand and speak Latin, but in all other respects, she’s on her own – including not knowing where or when it is in Roman times, that she has landed up.

A long voyage of discovery and disillusionment for the heroine. Among other things – she being a nominal Christian – she finds that in the time and place where she has landed, Christians are seen as; and largely behave as; a marginal bunch of fanatical, anti-social and potentially dangerous, at least borderline-terroristic, enemies of established society.  Early in her spell in the past – trying to figure out “when it is” – she asks the locals among whom she has landed, what year it is according to the Christian calendar.  The response is: “Do those loonies even have their own calendar?  That’s news to us.”

Margo

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2247 on: February 15, 2014, 02:43:44 PM »
A male barista is not a barrister.

aren't they called baristas, regardless of gender?

LOL..barrister?  :D

They are court advocates in England. Oh and they still wear wigs.
And Australia. And South Africa and quite a few other countries.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barrister

Think of it like a lawyer where the profession is split between barrister and solicitor. Barristers go to court, solicitors don't.

Ahem, incorrect.  I am an Australian solicitor and I appear in Court fequently. 

Barristers tend to do more advocacy work, and are generally not instructed directly by a client, but rather through a solicitor.  Barristers often provide specialist advice, and draft or settle complex documents, and mostly solicitors do the more basic legwork when they are working together.  It's a difficult disctinction to define, but technically there's little a barrister can do that I can't - they're just more likely to have particular skills, and therefore do it better.  BUt its not like I'm not allowed to.
Yup. I'm a solicitor in the UK, and I go to court a fair bit, often appearing where there is a barrister appearing for the other party. As I deal with family cases, no-one (barristers or solicitors) wears wigs or gowns (nor does the Judge)
The main difference here  is that solicitors will deal with the case from the beginning, dealing with the client, preparing the documenta, working out what is and isn't relevant etc, before giving the barrister a set of papers and instructions to work from. Here in the UK the two professions are moving closer together - barristers can (in some circumstances) accept instructions directly from lay clients, and solicitor can obtain higher courts rights of audience (it used to be that solicitors could not appear in the Crown Court (Criminal) which was a little odd as we've always been able to appear in the County Court (Civil)

rose red

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2248 on: February 15, 2014, 04:37:42 PM »
As a kid I remember reading a book about a modern Jewish girl who is transported back in time to WWII, and when she asks someone what year it is, they say something like, "3023," and she's like, "WHAT? It can't be the future!" But the person she was talking to was using the Jewish year numbering system, which apparently was no longer common in her era. I think that was the first time it occurred to me that different groups could have different dating systems.

The Devil's Arithmetic by Jane Yolen?

I think you're right! :)

I haven't gotten around to reading the book, but the movie was pretty good.  I remember the part regarding the year in the movie too.

Library Dragon

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2249 on: February 15, 2014, 05:04:09 PM »
Brought to mind, the IMO splendid time-travel novel “Household Gods” by Harry Turtledove and Judith Tarr. On the “beware of what you wish for – you may get it” theme.  American professional lady circa 2000 AD, feeling bedevilled and harried by her assorted “First World problems”, dreams of how much better and simpler life would have been in Roman times. She is magically transported into those times – in the 2nd century AD, in a place on the far northern fringe of the Roman Empire – is given the magical ability to understand and speak Latin, but in all other respects, she’s on her own – including not knowing where or when it is in Roman times, that she has landed up.

A long voyage of discovery and disillusionment for the heroine. Among other things – she being a nominal Christian – she finds that in the time and place where she has landed, Christians are seen as; and largely behave as; a marginal bunch of fanatical, anti-social and potentially dangerous, at least borderline-terroristic, enemies of established society.  Early in her spell in the past – trying to figure out “when it is” – she asks the locals among whom she has landed, what year it is according to the Christian calendar.  The response is: “Do those loonies even have their own calendar?  That’s news to us.”

I enjoyed that book a great deal. Her ex was a super jerk, but her judgementalism was huge.

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