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  • November 17, 2017, 11:58:52 AM

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Author Topic: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People  (Read 1258488 times)

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Outdoor Girl

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By the way, a heart stopped from a lightning strike is one of the few conditions where CPR may actually restart the heart, rather than just keep the person alive until EMS can get there with a defibrilator.  (Just finished a First Aid course.)
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
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ladyknight1

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Yes, the chest compressions work to circulate the blood and can help to start the heart. I teach wilderness first aid.
ďAll that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost."
-J.R.R Tolkien

MrTango

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Buffalo Wild Wings restaurants have a promotion where they bring out "Limited-Time" sauces.  Every month or two, the sauce changes to something new.  Some of them are great, some not so great.

The issue is that they refer to the promotion as the "Sauce Lab" and they try to be clever by using elemental symbols for the sauces.

One sauce a couple months ago was "The Big Easy."  They so cleverly decided to use "Be" as the symbol for the sauce.  The current sauce is "Honey Ginger," and the symbol being used is "Hg".

I mentioned to the store manager that they might want to reconsider using the atomic symbols for Beryllium and Mercury for their food products.   ::)

Yvaine

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Buffalo Wild Wings restaurants have a promotion where they bring out "Limited-Time" sauces.  Every month or two, the sauce changes to something new.  Some of them are great, some not so great.

The issue is that they refer to the promotion as the "Sauce Lab" and they try to be clever by using elemental symbols for the sauces.

One sauce a couple months ago was "The Big Easy."  They so cleverly decided to use "Be" as the symbol for the sauce.  The current sauce is "Honey Ginger," and the symbol being used is "Hg".

I mentioned to the store manager that they might want to reconsider using the atomic symbols for Beryllium and Mercury for their food products.   ::)

They probably did it on purpose!  :) Everybody knows it's not really beryllium and mercury in there, and yet most people will probably vaguely recognize them as real elemental symbols, so it'll come off as "sciencey." And looking at the bottles online, the real name is in almost as big a font as the symbol.

MommyPenguin

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By the way, a heart stopped from a lightning strike is one of the few conditions where CPR may actually restart the heart, rather than just keep the person alive until EMS can get there with a defibrilator.  (Just finished a First Aid course.)

Another interesting bit of trivia... Mary Anning, who is credited with finding several significant fossils and really kick-starting paleontology, was supposedly struck by lightning as a baby.  She was being held by a woman, who was standing with several other women (I believe under a tree?).  Lightning struck and all three women were killed, but little baby Mary survived.
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kherbert05

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My sister was hit by a "side flash" from a lightening strike. It hit a tree near by while she and others were running to class at university. The only people knocked to the ground/knocked out all were carrying umbrellas with metal rods.


People in my family now use ponchos not umbrellas.
Don't Teach Them For Your Past. Teach Them For Their Future

gramma dishes

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My sister was hit by a "side flash" from a lightening strike. It hit a tree near by while she and others were running to class at university. The only people knocked to the ground/knocked out all were carrying umbrellas with metal rods.


People in my family now use ponchos not umbrellas.

We used to take a lot of field trips with our local college.  One of the requirements was that every participant had to have a rain jacket with a hood.  No umbrellas allowed, ever.

ladyknight1

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We use fiberglass shaft umbrellas. No metal.
ďAll that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost."
-J.R.R Tolkien

Alias

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When you're out sick from work, you should contact someone at work and let them know. Obviously if you're in the emergency room or something, this won't be the first thing on your mind; but if you're just feeling under the weather, you should really contact us to say you won't be in Thursday. Or Friday. Or Monday. Instead of showing up for your first day of work on Wednesday, and then vanishing from the face of the earth until next Tuesday, and claiming you didn't know who to contact.

Also, if you change your schedule for the day, and decide to come in for the afternoon shift instead of the morning as written on the schedule, you should let someone know.

Also, if you're supposed to come in at 10am, but you email to say you'd rather come in at 1pm, hey, points for contacting me! But if your reasoning is, you overslept and missed your 9am class, so you need to make it up with a noon class... that's not very impressive to your employer.

If you're going on holiday, you should let someone know. Seriously, we had someone get in touch 3 days after they left the country to say 'by the way, we got a last minute deal on a trip to <where ever> and I'll be back in two weeks'.  Yes, she does still have a job, it's not the sort of place you get fired from easily.

Hillia

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DS  is currently in hot debate with a coworker over whether or not 1cc = 1ml.  They have to dilute a particular product; coworker is first off using the wrong dilution proportion (3 to 1, instead of 2 to 1), and when DS sent out a memo saying "1 cc of product to 2 cc of dilutant' she got all outraged - in addition to the proportions, it should be MLs, not CCs.

She's been doing this for some time and is supposedly highly trained, so not knowing something that I was able to dredge up from 10th grade chemistry 35+ years ago is pretty bad.


ladyknight1

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I had to explain to my boss today that she would not be able to remote access into her computer until Sunday. The building power is being shut off tomorrow and our computers automatically boot at midnight.

She kept arguing with me that it would boot as soon as the power came back on. Sigh.
ďAll that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost."
-J.R.R Tolkien

Onyx_TKD

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DS  is currently in hot debate with a coworker over whether or not 1cc = 1ml.  They have to dilute a particular product; coworker is first off using the wrong dilution proportion (3 to 1, instead of 2 to 1), and when DS sent out a memo saying "1 cc of product to 2 cc of dilutant' she got all outraged - in addition to the proportions, it should be MLs, not CCs.

She's been doing this for some time and is supposedly highly trained, so not knowing something that I was able to dredge up from 10th grade chemistry 35+ years ago is pretty bad.

*blink* *blink* ??? But...it's a ratio. It doesn't matter whether 1cc = 1mL as long as the same unit is used for both product and dilutant. Any "1 [unit of volume] of product to 2 [same unit of volume] of dilutant" will dilute it by the same proportion regardless of the unit. He could have quoted in it cubic lightyears and it would still be the same proportion. If this woman doesn't grasp that fact, I think it's more frightening than her forgetting which units correspond to one another.  :-\

CuriousParty

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DS  is currently in hot debate with a coworker over whether or not 1cc = 1ml.  They have to dilute a particular product; coworker is first off using the wrong dilution proportion (3 to 1, instead of 2 to 1), and when DS sent out a memo saying "1 cc of product to 2 cc of dilutant' she got all outraged - in addition to the proportions, it should be MLs, not CCs.

She's been doing this for some time and is supposedly highly trained, so not knowing something that I was able to dredge up from 10th grade chemistry 35+ years ago is pretty bad.

*blink* *blink* ??? But...it's a ratio. It doesn't matter whether 1cc = 1mL as long as the same unit is used for both product and dilutant. Any "1 [unit of volume] of product to 2 [same unit of volume] of dilutant" will dilute it by the same proportion regardless of the unit. He could have quoted in it cubic lightyears and it would still be the same proportion. If this woman doesn't grasp that fact, I think it's more frightening than her forgetting which units correspond to one another.  :-\

Well, I think the issue there is that if 1 cc =/= 1 mL, the ratio would stay the same but the dosage could be off. So if 1 cc = 1.5 mL, for example, using a total of 3 cc results in 4.5 mL.  Not good, depending on what you are getting an extra 1.5 of.

However, a quick google search (because what do I know about cc's or mL, and I could be working, so let's google something random) says that 1 cc does = 1 mL. So there are a couple of things off here...

z_squared82

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My friend was confused why I was allergic to our other friend's dogs. "But they're short-haired," she said. "That's makes them hypoallergenic!"

Um, no, the length of the hair has nothing to do with it. The severity of my allergic reaction depends on how much the dog sheds, and then dander.

Which she should know. B/c she's allergic to dogs, too.

Dazi

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My friend was confused why I was allergic to our other friend's dogs. "But they're short-haired," she said. "That's makes them hypoallergenic!"

Um, no, the length of the hair has nothing to do with it. The severity of my allergic reaction depends on how much the dog sheds, and then dander.

Which she should know. B/c she's allergic to dogs, too.

I have specific breeds that are worse for me and some breeds don't bother me at all.  Example: I'm terribly allergic to beagles and to a slightly lesser extent, poodles,  like my eyes will swell shut and I will have trouble breathing before I make it to the front door of someone who has one. Fluffy bacon-fed knave pomeranians don't bother me at all and I seldom have any issues with Labs,  German Shepherds, or chihuahuas. Most others cause a mild reaction.

My MIL is allergic to cats, but is much more allergic to male cats.
Meditate. Live purely. Quiet the mind. Do your work with mastery. Like the moon, come out from behind the clouds! Shine. ---Gautama Buddah