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  • August 19, 2017, 05:59:02 PM

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Author Topic: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People  (Read 1133019 times)

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Mad Goat Woman

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I love that quote, Gramma Dishes!  :)  That's great.

Kimblee, I love the idea of getting them drunk!  That's so funny.

Lady Knight, that sounds like a great retirement plan!  We recently found out about "mini cows," and now we really want one.  :)  I told my husband that maybe our next location, especially if we end up in a part of the country where land is cheap, we should try for a small farm.  He really wants the pig, I really want the cow.  My 7-year-old *desperately* wants a cow and promises to feed it, milk it, muck its stall, compost its manure, etc. if I will only buy her a cow.  :)  She's determined to be a farmer when she grows up.  She wants all the animals plus the land to farm.

My dad says our backyard looks like a farm, between the chickens and the extensive garden beds, latticework and teepee for peas, etc.  And we're lucky enough to have woods and a creek just behind.  Sometimes I wish I were one of my kids, I'd love to grow up that way.
(Bolding mine)
Your DD would be better with a goat to learn to milk on. There's only two teats, as opposed to four. Less chance of being maimed by the animal, too, especially if the cow is a kicking type. :)

Captains Flat, Australia

Elisabunny

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Me too. I was never meant to live in the city.

We will most likely have a few horses, two cows, two pigs, 10-20 chickens, and possibly goats. Two planted acres, and one acre orchard.

This is all so interesting.  I am such a city girl, it's not even funny

You & me both. Although I would like to have beehives - DH is on board in spite of being allergic, the goof - and we go back & forth on chickens. We'd love to have the eggs, but not sure if we want to actually care for chickens. So we'll just stick with buying those.

What you do is get a neighbor who loves chickens and wants more than they have need for eggs.
You must remember this: a ghoti is still a fish...

Katana_Geldar

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One year I went to an agricultural show and went in the Ingham tent, they sell chicken. I was rather disturbed by the fact that the little baby chicks were just in sight of the cold cabinet of chicken.

Shea

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(She did, however, try to get my male cat's attention, but since he was neutered he had no interest whatsoever, except that she was interrupting his nap.)
Several years ago, I took in a litter of feral kittens to socialize them. My alpha male was neutered, but took on a paternal interest in training the kittens up in the ways they should go. But after they hit puberty... Everyone has been neutered for years now, but still, sometimes, the males will get an INTERESTED look on their face. Benedict was neutered as a kitten, before meeting a female, but about once a year I will find him pinning down one of the girls, mainly because the girlcat starts hollering for help. He always has a very confused look on his face, because while he could obviously have learned this maneuver from watching the post-pubertal kittens years ago, what happens next continues to elude him.

Haha! I knew a horse that did something similar. He was a very elderly (25+) gelding (a neutered male horse), but he hadn't been gelded until he was 4 or 5, which was unusual since it's normal to geld a colt before the age of one year. So this sweet old fellow had some dim memories of being a stallion, and he acted on this by having a small harem of mares who he jealously guarded from the other geldings, none of whom could possibly have cared less. He wasn't quite sure what to do with them, there was just something back there in the dusty corners of his memory telling him he really needed a collection of mares.


If a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, librarians are a global threat.

MommyPenguin

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lol at the gelding and his collection of mares!  :)

Chickens are easy to take care of, jedikaiti.  :)  Most of the effort goes into fixing up a coop and chicken run, and there's a bit more required when they're little babies and need to be inside.  Still *way* less than most other animals.  Once they're big enough to go outside (and you can just start with bigger ones, look on craigslist), they're really easy, very low maintenance.  And yum for fresh eggs.  :)

I'd like to do beekeeping, too, but we actually have a hive somewhere, I think, as I've seen a lot of bees about.  So, no honey for me, but at least plenty of bees to help pollinate all our plants.  :)
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Luci

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Would someone please tell me why when I was 7 I helped my grandmother head, gut, pluck chickens, and now at 69 can not look at a whole hen or Thanksgiving turkey without getting upset? Helped my dad skin rabbits and squirrels, too.

Not a vegetarian, but at this point I would have to be mighty hungry to catch a rabbit or bird and dress and cook it.

Minmom3

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Fluffy bacon-fed knave pomeranians don't bother me at all and I seldom have any issues with Labs,  German Shepherds, or chihuahuas.

Bacon fed pomeranian? That must be one happy pup :)

Actually (in all seriousness) more likely to have pancreatitis and be miserable.  [We had a woman bring her under 1 year old MinPin in the hospital with bad vomiting and diarrhea.  After much questioning, it turned out when the Dr told her '2 small pieces of lean meat, and held his fingers to show a size about 1" by 0.5" by 0.5" ', SHE took that to mean 2 full rashers of bacon a day would be fine....  $1000 later, she learned just how wrong she was.

I wish I could remember which phrase is it that the filter substitutes with Bacon Fed Knave...  Makes a funny sentence!
Double MIL now; not yet a Grandma.  Owner of Lard Butt Noelle, kitteh extraordinaire!

TootsNYC

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Quote
1 cc does = 1 mL.

This is the whole point of the metric system. Converting from liquid measure to mass.

jaxsue

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Would someone please tell me why when I was 7 I helped my grandmother head, gut, pluck chickens, and now at 69 can not look at a whole hen or Thanksgiving turkey without getting upset? Helped my dad skin rabbits and squirrels, too.

Not a vegetarian, but at this point I would have to be mighty hungry to catch a rabbit or bird and dress and cook it.

Like you, I helped "process" chickens as a child. We were required to help, and yet to this day I love to eat chicken. Different people, different outcomes.

Harriet Jones

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I wish I could remember which phrase is it that the filter substitutes with Bacon Fed Knave...  Makes a funny sentence!

The 3-letter synonym for donkey

Outdoor Girl

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Quote
1 cc does = 1 mL.

This is the whole point of the metric system. Converting from liquid measure to mass.

Both of those are volume.  1 mL, or 1 cc, of pure water would weigh 1 gram.  cc is cubic centimeter.

1000 cc = 1000 mL = 1 litre.  1 litre of pure water weighs 1 kilogram.

I work in drinking water.  We talk about daily production of water in metres cubed (m3), which is equivalent to 1000 L.
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
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lowspark

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This was a teen, not an adult, but still:

My brother had some friends over.  My mom made veal parmesan.  One of the girls didn't know what that was:

Mom: Veal?  You know?

Girl: *blank stare*

Mom: Veal is baby cow.  You know, like lamb is baby sheep?

Girl: People eat sheep?

I was almost going to say in this thread that I wonder how anyone with two brain cells cannot understand where food comes, even without being told it. I never remember being told, it was so clear, we would eat chicken and pig and so on, and you know they are animals too. But then I started to wonder the English language, and how there is beef and pork and so on. I'm not a native speaker, but I've understood that these terms are usually used about meat, not really as "oh, there is the pork walking around, saying oink". So maybe it's not as clear if your mother says it's going to be pork today compared to if she would say it's going to be pig today.

We got some chickens the other day (live chickens) that will be for meat.  They are young but not babies (fully-feathered, etc., not little downy chicks).  My SIL saw them, and she was horrified at the thought that we'd be eating them.  "So you're just going to let them live outside in the sunshine, and walk around the yard, and play outside, and then you're going to kill them and eat them?  That's inhumane!"  She's not a vegetarian and has no problem eating chicken from the grocery store, but apparently having chickens live free range until they're ready to eat, rather than live in boxes at a chicken farm, is inhumane.  Or maybe it's the whole "seeing your food alive before you eat it" that is disturbing.

When I was 11 years old, I stayed for a month with an aunt & uncle, and my uncle had some chicks which he was raising with the intent of eating them. At the point this story happened they were like somewhere between being babies and full grown. He kept them in some kind of a cage/coop and every day he would let them out into the fenced yard area to run around for a while. One particular chick (apparently he could tell them apart!) gave him trouble every day about going back into the cage. He'd spend too much time chasing that one chick down.

So he said, "tomorrow, if you give me trouble again, it'll be your last day." Well sure enough, it did. He killed it. And my aunt cooked it. At first I was pretty apprehensive about eating this animal which just moments ago I'd seen running around the yard. But my cousin didn't have any qualms so I figured, what the heck! And the two of us ate that bird.

I think it can come as a bit of a shock to think about where your food comes from when you've never been around any kind of situation to see them live first, and especially when you're a child. But you know, you just get over it. At least, I did.
Houston 
Texas 
USA 

AfleetAlex

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Even seeing baby chicks at the fair puts me off chicken for a few days, and I'm not much of a meat eater to begin with. I would be a terrible farmer. If I got to know it, I couldn't eat it!  :-[
I have a chronic case of foot-in-mouth disease.

Ms_Cellany

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You & me both. Although I would like to have beehives - DH is on board in spite of being allergic, the goof - and we go back & forth on chickens. We'd love to have the eggs, but not sure if we want to actually care for chickens. So we'll just stick with buying those.

I'll tell the story again about how to inspect and treat them for lice, if that'll help decide you.   >:D
Bingle bongle dingle dangle yickity-do yickity-dah ping-pong lippy-toppy too tah.

Margo

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This was a teen, not an adult, but still:

My brother had some friends over.  My mom made veal parmesan.  One of the girls didn't know what that was:

Mom: Veal?  You know?

Girl: *blank stare*

Mom: Veal is baby cow.  You know, like lamb is baby sheep?

Girl: People eat sheep?

I was almost going to say in this thread that I wonder how anyone with two brain cells cannot understand where food comes, even without being told it. I never remember being told, it was so clear, we would eat chicken and pig and so on, and you know they are animals too. But then I started to wonder the English language, and how there is beef and pork and so on. I'm not a native speaker, but I've understood that these terms are usually used about meat, not really as "oh, there is the pork walking around, saying oink". So maybe it's not as clear if your mother says it's going to be pork today compared to if she would say it's going to be pig today.

We got some chickens the other day (live chickens) that will be for meat.  They are young but not babies (fully-feathered, etc., not little downy chicks).  My SIL saw them, and she was horrified at the thought that we'd be eating them.  "So you're just going to let them live outside in the sunshine, and walk around the yard, and play outside, and then you're going to kill them and eat them?  That's inhumane!"  She's not a vegetarian and has no problem eating chicken from the grocery store, but apparently having chickens live free range until they're ready to eat, rather than live in boxes at a chicken farm, is inhumane.  Or maybe it's the whole "seeing your food alive before you eat it" that is disturbing.

When I was 11 years old, I stayed for a month with an aunt & uncle, and my uncle had some chicks which he was raising with the intent of eating them. At the point this story happened they were like somewhere between being babies and full grown. He kept them in some kind of a cage/coop and every day he would let them out into the fenced yard area to run around for a while. One particular chick (apparently he could tell them apart!) gave him trouble every day about going back into the cage. He'd spend too much time chasing that one chick down.

So he said, "tomorrow, if you give me trouble again, it'll be your last day." Well sure enough, it did. He killed it. And my aunt cooked it. At first I was pretty apprehensive about eating this animal which just moments ago I'd seen running around the yard. But my cousin didn't have any qualms so I figured, what the heck! And the two of us ate that bird.

I think it can come as a bit of a shock to think about where your food comes from when you've never been around any kind of situation to see them live first, and especially when you're a child. But you know, you just get over it. At least, I did.

Yes.  I actually prefer to buy/eat meat where I've seen it running around. That way, i know much more about the conditions it's been kept in. I don't raise animals for food myself, but I have farming friends. I've met my Christmas turkey every year for the past 5 years, and I've eaten beef which I first met as an adorable calf sucking my fingers. In each case, I know that they were very well cared for, and that they were slaughtered locally and with minimal stress. I don't know those things about he meat I buy in the supermarket.
(of course, the fact that the meat tastes way better is a bonus!)