Author Topic: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People  (Read 308243 times)

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TootsNYC

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1 cc does = 1 mL.

This is the whole point of the metric system. Converting from liquid measure to mass.

jaxsue

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Would someone please tell me why when I was 7 I helped my grandmother head, gut, pluck chickens, and now at 69 can not look at a whole hen or Thanksgiving turkey without getting upset? Helped my dad skin rabbits and squirrels, too.

Not a vegetarian, but at this point I would have to be mighty hungry to catch a rabbit or bird and dress and cook it.

Like you, I helped "process" chickens as a child. We were required to help, and yet to this day I love to eat chicken. Different people, different outcomes.

Harriet Jones

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I wish I could remember which phrase is it that the filter substitutes with Bacon Fed Knave...  Makes a funny sentence!

The 3-letter synonym for donkey

Outdoor Girl

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1 cc does = 1 mL.

This is the whole point of the metric system. Converting from liquid measure to mass.

Both of those are volume.  1 mL, or 1 cc, of pure water would weigh 1 gram.  cc is cubic centimeter.

1000 cc = 1000 mL = 1 litre.  1 litre of pure water weighs 1 kilogram.

I work in drinking water.  We talk about daily production of water in metres cubed (m3), which is equivalent to 1000 L.
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Ontario

lowspark

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This was a teen, not an adult, but still:

My brother had some friends over.  My mom made veal parmesan.  One of the girls didn't know what that was:

Mom: Veal?  You know?

Girl: *blank stare*

Mom: Veal is baby cow.  You know, like lamb is baby sheep?

Girl: People eat sheep?

I was almost going to say in this thread that I wonder how anyone with two brain cells cannot understand where food comes, even without being told it. I never remember being told, it was so clear, we would eat chicken and pig and so on, and you know they are animals too. But then I started to wonder the English language, and how there is beef and pork and so on. I'm not a native speaker, but I've understood that these terms are usually used about meat, not really as "oh, there is the pork walking around, saying oink". So maybe it's not as clear if your mother says it's going to be pork today compared to if she would say it's going to be pig today.

We got some chickens the other day (live chickens) that will be for meat.  They are young but not babies (fully-feathered, etc., not little downy chicks).  My SIL saw them, and she was horrified at the thought that we'd be eating them.  "So you're just going to let them live outside in the sunshine, and walk around the yard, and play outside, and then you're going to kill them and eat them?  That's inhumane!"  She's not a vegetarian and has no problem eating chicken from the grocery store, but apparently having chickens live free range until they're ready to eat, rather than live in boxes at a chicken farm, is inhumane.  Or maybe it's the whole "seeing your food alive before you eat it" that is disturbing.

When I was 11 years old, I stayed for a month with an aunt & uncle, and my uncle had some chicks which he was raising with the intent of eating them. At the point this story happened they were like somewhere between being babies and full grown. He kept them in some kind of a cage/coop and every day he would let them out into the fenced yard area to run around for a while. One particular chick (apparently he could tell them apart!) gave him trouble every day about going back into the cage. He'd spend too much time chasing that one chick down.

So he said, "tomorrow, if you give me trouble again, it'll be your last day." Well sure enough, it did. He killed it. And my aunt cooked it. At first I was pretty apprehensive about eating this animal which just moments ago I'd seen running around the yard. But my cousin didn't have any qualms so I figured, what the heck! And the two of us ate that bird.

I think it can come as a bit of a shock to think about where your food comes from when you've never been around any kind of situation to see them live first, and especially when you're a child. But you know, you just get over it. At least, I did.

AfleetAlex

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Even seeing baby chicks at the fair puts me off chicken for a few days, and I'm not much of a meat eater to begin with. I would be a terrible farmer. If I got to know it, I couldn't eat it!  :-[
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Ms_Cellany

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You & me both. Although I would like to have beehives - DH is on board in spite of being allergic, the goof - and we go back & forth on chickens. We'd love to have the eggs, but not sure if we want to actually care for chickens. So we'll just stick with buying those.

I'll tell the story again about how to inspect and treat them for lice, if that'll help decide you.   >:D
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Margo

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This was a teen, not an adult, but still:

My brother had some friends over.  My mom made veal parmesan.  One of the girls didn't know what that was:

Mom: Veal?  You know?

Girl: *blank stare*

Mom: Veal is baby cow.  You know, like lamb is baby sheep?

Girl: People eat sheep?

I was almost going to say in this thread that I wonder how anyone with two brain cells cannot understand where food comes, even without being told it. I never remember being told, it was so clear, we would eat chicken and pig and so on, and you know they are animals too. But then I started to wonder the English language, and how there is beef and pork and so on. I'm not a native speaker, but I've understood that these terms are usually used about meat, not really as "oh, there is the pork walking around, saying oink". So maybe it's not as clear if your mother says it's going to be pork today compared to if she would say it's going to be pig today.

We got some chickens the other day (live chickens) that will be for meat.  They are young but not babies (fully-feathered, etc., not little downy chicks).  My SIL saw them, and she was horrified at the thought that we'd be eating them.  "So you're just going to let them live outside in the sunshine, and walk around the yard, and play outside, and then you're going to kill them and eat them?  That's inhumane!"  She's not a vegetarian and has no problem eating chicken from the grocery store, but apparently having chickens live free range until they're ready to eat, rather than live in boxes at a chicken farm, is inhumane.  Or maybe it's the whole "seeing your food alive before you eat it" that is disturbing.

When I was 11 years old, I stayed for a month with an aunt & uncle, and my uncle had some chicks which he was raising with the intent of eating them. At the point this story happened they were like somewhere between being babies and full grown. He kept them in some kind of a cage/coop and every day he would let them out into the fenced yard area to run around for a while. One particular chick (apparently he could tell them apart!) gave him trouble every day about going back into the cage. He'd spend too much time chasing that one chick down.

So he said, "tomorrow, if you give me trouble again, it'll be your last day." Well sure enough, it did. He killed it. And my aunt cooked it. At first I was pretty apprehensive about eating this animal which just moments ago I'd seen running around the yard. But my cousin didn't have any qualms so I figured, what the heck! And the two of us ate that bird.

I think it can come as a bit of a shock to think about where your food comes from when you've never been around any kind of situation to see them live first, and especially when you're a child. But you know, you just get over it. At least, I did.

Yes.  I actually prefer to buy/eat meat where I've seen it running around. That way, i know much more about the conditions it's been kept in. I don't raise animals for food myself, but I have farming friends. I've met my Christmas turkey every year for the past 5 years, and I've eaten beef which I first met as an adorable calf sucking my fingers. In each case, I know that they were very well cared for, and that they were slaughtered locally and with minimal stress. I don't know those things about he meat I buy in the supermarket.
(of course, the fact that the meat tastes way better is a bonus!)

Jocelyn

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Tonight I went to a lecture at the library about conservation efforts to re-establish large game populations in this area. The lecturer covered that all the animals he was talking about are protected and cannot be hunted, but as populations increase, hunting may be an option in the future. Someone asked if all the animals were edible, and he replied that all were edible, but some were not particularly tasty, but that elk were very good eating. (elk being the largest of the deer family).
Then one woman asked if one could go to the Elks Lodge and eat elk.
He very kindly explained that the Fraternal Order of the Elks was just that, a fraternal service club not unlike the Masons, and no, they did not eat elk at their lodge. 

VorFemme

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Some people are very, very literal minded...she must have been one of them.
« Last Edit: June 20, 2014, 01:21:38 PM by VorFemme »
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Breezygirl

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Years ago when one of my sons was in play school I was a volunteer from time to time in his class. Once the children were all gathered around the teacher in a circle on the floor. The teacher asked them to name things that started with the letter "N". The children said things like "nail, night light, noodle, napkin, nut....." Then one of the boys said "knife". The teachers said that was correct.

After the class I was talking to the teacher and nicely told her that knife started with a "K" not a "N". She said it did not and that it started with an "N" and got quite offended when I assured her it did and huffed away saying she was right.
Someday, somehow, somewhere.....

Shalamar

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That reminds me of when I finally got the joke in the line "Silly English k-niggets" from Holy Grail:)

staceym

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Years ago when one of my sons was in play school I was a volunteer from time to time in his class. Once the children were all gathered around the teacher in a circle on the floor. The teacher asked them to name things that started with the letter "N". The children said things like "nail, night light, noodle, napkin, nut....." Then one of the boys said "knife". The teachers said that was correct.

After the class I was talking to the teacher and nicely told her that knife started with a "K" not a "N". She said it did not and that it started with an "N" and got quite offended when I assured her it did and huffed away saying she was right.

this reminds me of something that happened last week.  I belong to a social club and work there on Friday/Saturday nights when they have a DJ.  One guy who does the announcements of events coming up and prints an events calendar asked me how to spell buffet.  And I spelled it correctly - buffet.  He told me no, that isn't how you spell it that is buff - et.  I grinned and said, no you really spell it like I did.  He kind of argued back and then I said "well how else could it be spelled" because at that point I was starting to doubt myself?  He went buffey  :o
« Last Edit: June 13, 2014, 04:20:28 PM by staceym »

poundcake

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That reminds me of when I finally got the joke in the line "Silly English k-niggets" from Holy Grail:)

 :) Of course, in Middle English, it WAS pronounced "k-nick-t" so not only did you get the joke, you got a taste of linguistic history, too. But don't worry, it's just a flesh wound.

jpcher

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Today we were discussing what's for lunch in the cafeteria. One CW said that she was getting the fageeta buffet. I had to ask her three times to repeat the word and then asked what the heck is on a fageeta buffet? She laughed and said "It's really fajita's but you gotta pronounce the J don't you know." (yes, she was joking. ;))


Same CW asked me today why her white box wasn't printing on colored paper. I had to tell her that they don't make white ink. ::)