Author Topic: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned  (Read 107290 times)

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cabbageweevil

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The other day someone was talking about the Stanley cup and I felt like such a moron when I had to ask DH where the teams for that were from. I didn't understand if it was hockey teams from around the world, or just from Canada, or from North America.... he laughed at me, boo!

I don't think this really fits the category of things adults should know.  I bet a LOT of people don't know.  For one, me!  I don't know the first thing about hockey.  I wouldn't even know what the Stanley Cup *is*....well, now I do, I guess. :)

Shoo, I'm completely with you there.  In defence of the more-than-tiny minority of people on the planet who are not interested in sports: I don't think anybody need to be ashamed of sports-related ignorance, or feel that any fact or information to do with sports, is something which all adults should know.

I remember a conversation with a work colleague, many years ago.  He mentioned a prominent English cricketer who was at the time performing mighty cricketing feats here in England; he was staggered when sports-hater me replied (in genuine ignorance), "who is this fellow? -- I've never heard of him", and his reaction was highly condescending.  I "let it ride"; but wanted to say, "Look, chum, I have absolutely zero interest in cricket -- why on earth should I have been highly au fait with this hero of yours?"

Sports fans, more power to you and your enjoyment of that scene -- please just have in mind that not everyone is keen on it, or needs to be.

cwm

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The other day someone was talking about the Stanley cup and I felt like such a moron when I had to ask DH where the teams for that were from. I didn't understand if it was hockey teams from around the world, or just from Canada, or from North America.... he laughed at me, boo!

I don't think this really fits the category of things adults should know.  I bet a LOT of people don't know.  For one, me!  I don't know the first thing about hockey.  I wouldn't even know what the Stanley Cup *is*....well, now I do, I guess. :)

Shoo, I'm completely with you there.  In defence of the more-than-tiny minority of people on the planet who are not interested in sports: I don't think anybody need to be ashamed of sports-related ignorance, or feel that any fact or information to do with sports, is something which all adults should know.

I remember a conversation with a work colleague, many years ago.  He mentioned a prominent English cricketer who was at the time performing mighty cricketing feats here in England; he was staggered when sports-hater me replied (in genuine ignorance), "who is this fellow? -- I've never heard of him", and his reaction was highly condescending.  I "let it ride"; but wanted to say, "Look, chum, I have absolutely zero interest in cricket -- why on earth should I have been highly au fait with this hero of yours?"

Sports fans, more power to you and your enjoyment of that scene -- please just have in mind that not everyone is keen on it, or needs to be.

Yes.

I used to regularly follow one college team in one sport. That was it. I knew the basics of some other sports, and knew enough to make fun of my hometown pro teams. (Trust me, I wasn't in the minority for that. They're pretty much terrible.) But when my at-the-time girlfriend started talking hockey, it went right over my head. She got incensed that I didn't know exactly what she was talking about. Well, the nearest pro hockey team is on the other side of the next state over, we've never had a team, I've never cared to understand it, and I've never met anyone else who did care. So why did it matter how much I knew?

I've had people on my case about not understanding how cricket is played. I live in the middle of the USA, not a country where cricket is popular. The closest I've ever been to a country where cricket was a big deal was a weeklong trip to Italy. Barring that....um, I watch BBC shows? Why would I ever know how cricket was played, or even care?

Betelnut

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I kind of disagree about the sports thing.  I'm not a huge sports fan either but I do consider it part of my culture and is thus something that I feel like I should know a little bit about.

I would totally understand if a person from somewhere not the U.S. didn't understand/know about football (U.S. version) and, I hope, people from other countries don't hate on me for not understanding cricket but if a person who is raised in the United States (and was an adult) doesn't know what a touchdown is or the basics of baseball (number of innings, etc.), I would be surprised and I would definitely think of him/her as ignorant about his/her own culture.

Sort of like I would also be surprised if an adult didn't know who Louis Armstrong or Ella Fitzgerald is.  It is our culture--you don't need to be a jazz fan to know the names.
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KenveeB

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I kind of disagree about the sports thing.  I'm not a huge sports fan either but I do consider it part of my culture and is thus something that I feel like I should know a little bit about.

I would totally understand if a person from somewhere not the U.S. didn't understand/know about football (U.S. version) and, I hope, people from other countries don't hate on me for not understanding cricket but if a person who is raised in the United States (and was an adult) doesn't know what a touchdown is or the basics of baseball (number of innings, etc.), I would be surprised and I would definitely think of him/her as ignorant about his/her own culture.

Sort of like I would also be surprised if an adult didn't know who Louis Armstrong or Ella Fitzgerald is.  It is our culture--you don't need to be a jazz fan to know the names.

I do agree with this. I'm NOT a sports fan. I HATE sports -- except for Texas Rangers baseball, which I follow a little. :)  But I know the basics of the rules for football, baseball, and basketball, which are the major sports in my area. I don't feel any need to know anything about hockey or cricket, because they're not popular around me. But knowing what a touchdown is and what the Super Bowl is are part of the culture around me, and I would feel out of place not being part of that.

CakeBeret

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I was an avid reader from a very early age, and I often used words that I had read but never heard. My parents teased me mercilessly if I mispronounced them, so I stopped using new words. :( These days I use google pronunciation and practice saying a word several times before I feel comfortable using it. There are some words I don't use because I can't seem to get the pronunciation quite right. For example I always say "silverware" or "forks and knives" and never use the word "cutlery" because that was one of the worst cases of being teased over mispronunciation. I still can't say it properly.

I was clued in to the gas tank arrow when I was 17 or 18.

I have to admit, all the outrage over identical twins and the physical impossibility of them being differently gendered, was something I had simply never thought about. If I weren't such a reserved person, I may very well have made the same mistake. It's not something one tends to think about--IMO many people tend to focus on identicality of physical features such as eyes and nose and don't give any thought to the baby's genitalia.
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Outdoor Girl

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I'm NOT a sports fan. I HATE sports -- except for Texas Rangers baseball, which I follow a little. :)

My condolances.   ;)  (at least they way they are playing lately)

With my group of friends, I would never try to schedule a non-related event on Superbowl Sunday.  Or Grey Cup Sunday, for that matter.  Nor would I want to have an event scheduled during Game 7 of the Stanley Cup Playoffs.  Although this one can be tough, with the season stretching to the end of June these days.  Seriously.  Game 4 is tonight and there are potentially 3 more games.  Although I hope not.  The sooner Boston wins, the sooner I get my hockey pool money.   ;D

But I wouldn't even think about trying to schedule anything around any kind of regular season game, even if it was the biggest rivalry going.  Like the Yankees and the Red Sox.  Wouldn't even cross my mind, if I was throwing a party or something.
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CakeBeret

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The other day someone was talking about the Stanley cup and I felt like such a moron when I had to ask DH where the teams for that were from. I didn't understand if it was hockey teams from around the world, or just from Canada, or from North America.... he laughed at me, boo!

It's okay, sometimes my DH will say "I'm buying tickets to the game Tuesday night" and I have to ask what sport is currently playing. :-\ I really, really do not keep up with sports.

I'm a pretty intelligent person, but I was raised by a sports nut father who expected me to magically understand sports and would react badly to me asking questions, and a mother who had no knowledge or interest. I still don't fully understand American football. My DH is very good about explaining things without making me feel like a moron, but I can't quite wrap my head around "downs".
"From a procrastination standpoint, today has been wildly successful."

Slartibartfast

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I don't think everyone needs to know the details of every sport, but I do think at a minimum you should know the names and sports of whatever your locally-popular professional sports franchises are.  In Wisconsin, the Green Bay Packers are about as close to a state-mandated religion as you can get  :P

Jones

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I wasn't raised to know anything about sports, I have a faint grasp on the most basic rules of baseball and basketball, even less on U S football although I can watch a soccer game all right. My husband doesn't follow sports at all, our FOOs don't follow at all, our close friends couldn't care less. The only time it affects me is at work functions, in which I can generally say "What do you think?" And the expert is on cloud 9.

FWIW, I also have no clue who Ella Fitzgerald is, and I was introduced to the music of Michael Jackson at age 17, before which time I had no clue who he was. My interests simply laid in other areas. I can tell all sorts of fantasy, historical and sci fi stories tho... ;)

lowspark

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The other day someone was talking about the Stanley cup and I felt like such a moron when I had to ask DH where the teams for that were from. I didn't understand if it was hockey teams from around the world, or just from Canada, or from North America.... he laughed at me, boo!

It's okay, sometimes my DH will say "I'm buying tickets to the game Tuesday night" and I have to ask what sport is currently playing. :-\ I really, really do not keep up with sports.

I'm a pretty intelligent person, but I was raised by a sports nut father who expected me to magically understand sports and would react badly to me asking questions, and a mother who had no knowledge or interest. I still don't fully understand American football. My DH is very good about explaining things without making me feel like a moron, but I can't quite wrap my head around "downs".

Here's how "downs" were explained to me, way back when, and it made perfect sense of something which, like you, I couldn't really get.

Down = Chance
When the team has the ball, they have four chances (downs) to progress a minimum of 10 yards down the field. So, their first chance = "first down & 10" meaning, this is their first chance and they need ten yards.

As they play each "down", they either gain yardage or lose it. And that yardage is either subtracted (if they gain) or added (if they lose) to the original 10. "Second down & 8" means they are now on their second chance and they have progressed two yards so they still need eight more to make the originally required 10.

Once they make the (at least) 10 yards (if indeed they do), the downs reset so they are back at "first & 10" with four new chances to make 10 additional yards.

By the time they get to the fourth down, if they still haven't made the 10, it's a calculated risk whether to go for that last yardage or not. If they don't make it, the other team gets the ball (and their four downs) right where they are. If they punt (kick the ball as far down the field as they can) then the other team gets the ball much further down the field.

Hope that helps!

cwm

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The other day someone was talking about the Stanley cup and I felt like such a moron when I had to ask DH where the teams for that were from. I didn't understand if it was hockey teams from around the world, or just from Canada, or from North America.... he laughed at me, boo!

It's okay, sometimes my DH will say "I'm buying tickets to the game Tuesday night" and I have to ask what sport is currently playing. :-\ I really, really do not keep up with sports.

I'm a pretty intelligent person, but I was raised by a sports nut father who expected me to magically understand sports and would react badly to me asking questions, and a mother who had no knowledge or interest. I still don't fully understand American football. My DH is very good about explaining things without making me feel like a moron, but I can't quite wrap my head around "downs".

Here's how "downs" were explained to me, way back when, and it made perfect sense of something which, like you, I couldn't really get.

Down = Chance
When the team has the ball, they have four chances (downs) to progress a minimum of 10 yards down the field. So, their first chance = "first down & 10" meaning, this is their first chance and they need ten yards.

As they play each "down", they either gain yardage or lose it. And that yardage is either subtracted (if they gain) or added (if they lose) to the original 10. "Second down & 8" means they are now on their second chance and they have progressed two yards so they still need eight more to make the originally required 10.

Once they make the (at least) 10 yards (if indeed they do), the downs reset so they are back at "first & 10" with four new chances to make 10 additional yards.

By the time they get to the fourth down, if they still haven't made the 10, it's a calculated risk whether to go for that last yardage or not. If they don't make it, the other team gets the ball (and their four downs) right where they are. If they punt (kick the ball as far down the field as they can) then the other team gets the ball much further down the field.

Hope that helps!

That actually expalins it very well.

I have a passing knowlege of American football, but only because I was in marching band and was forced to so many of those ridiculous games. And then when I ask my BF something, he'll correct me and giggle because the rules are different between high school and college. And then it's different again for professional.

I don't think everyone needs to know the details of every sport, but I do think at a minimum you should know the names and sports of whatever your locally-popular professional sports franchises are.  In Wisconsin, the Green Bay Packers are about as close to a state-mandated religion as you can get  :P

I don't agree with this. We've got pro football, pro baseball, pro soccer, NASCAR track, a minor league hockey team, an indoor football league, a nationally known roller derby team, and a fairly good AA baseball team that I can think of. There's a major university with a decent sports program within an hour's drive from my house. That's the sports I can think of off the top of my head. I won't say I know the rules to all of them or could list off the team names, but they're ALL locally-popular sports franchises, and outside of the University teams they all fall under the guise of "professional", as in people get paid to do this and make a living from it.

CakeBeret

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Thanks lowspark--that's definitely the clearest explanation I've ever been given!
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lowspark

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You're welcome! I got that explanation back in college. I went to the games because they were incredibly cheap for students but I was clueless as to what was going on on the field. Of course, there's a lot more to the rules of the game, but if you can at least grasp the concept of downs, it goes a really long way toward your enjoyment of watching the game because it's the most basic part of the process.

Tea Drinker

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The other day someone was talking about the Stanley cup and I felt like such a moron when I had to ask DH where the teams for that were from. I didn't understand if it was hockey teams from around the world, or just from Canada, or from North America.... he laughed at me, boo!

It's okay, sometimes my DH will say "I'm buying tickets to the game Tuesday night" and I have to ask what sport is currently playing. :-\ I really, really do not keep up with sports.

I'm a pretty intelligent person, but I was raised by a sports nut father who expected me to magically understand sports and would react badly to me asking questions, and a mother who had no knowledge or interest. I still don't fully understand American football. My DH is very good about explaining things without making me feel like a moron, but I can't quite wrap my head around "downs".

Here's how "downs" were explained to me, way back when, and it made perfect sense of something which, like you, I couldn't really get.

Down = Chance
When the team has the ball, they have four chances (downs) to progress a minimum of 10 yards down the field. So, their first chance = "first down & 10" meaning, this is their first chance and they need ten yards.

As they play each "down", they either gain yardage or lose it. And that yardage is either subtracted (if they gain) or added (if they lose) to the original 10. "Second down & 8" means they are now on their second chance and they have progressed two yards so they still need eight more to make the originally required 10.

Once they make the (at least) 10 yards (if indeed they do), the downs reset so they are back at "first & 10" with four new chances to make 10 additional yards.

By the time they get to the fourth down, if they still haven't made the 10, it's a calculated risk whether to go for that last yardage or not. If they don't make it, the other team gets the ball (and their four downs) right where they are. If they punt (kick the ball as far down the field as they can) then the other team gets the ball much further down the field.

Hope that helps!

That actually expalins it very well.

I have a passing knowlege of American football, but only because I was in marching band and was forced to so many of those ridiculous games. And then when I ask my BF something, he'll correct me and giggle because the rules are different between high school and college. And then it's different again for professional.

I don't think everyone needs to know the details of every sport, but I do think at a minimum you should know the names and sports of whatever your locally-popular professional sports franchises are.  In Wisconsin, the Green Bay Packers are about as close to a state-mandated religion as you can get  :P

I don't agree with this. We've got pro football, pro baseball, pro soccer, NASCAR track, a minor league hockey team, an indoor football league, a nationally known roller derby team, and a fairly good AA baseball team that I can think of. There's a major university with a decent sports program within an hour's drive from my house. That's the sports I can think of off the top of my head. I won't say I know the rules to all of them or could list off the team names, but they're ALL locally-popular sports franchises, and outside of the University teams they all fall under the guise of "professional", as in people get paid to do this and make a living from it.

POD to this. I lived most of my life in a city with, let's see, two major league baseball teams, two and then three NHL teams, two American football, two professional basketball teams and at least one big-deal college basketball team, professional soccer on and off, and the US Open tennis championships. On the other hand, I wasn't the only person who was tracking it mostly in the same way that some New Yorkers deal with politics, that is, largely as a traffic problem. Rangers playing the Islanders, there's going to be a crowd at the station I need to walk through on my way to the subway. UN General Assembly meeting or a presidential fund-raiser, rerouted buses and extra traffic jams. If a local football team wins the championship, that will mean streets closed for a parade.

There are fewer pro teams where I'm living now, but I got a job recruiter yesterday who assumed I would want to chat about the Yankees because he saw on my resume that I had recently moved from New York.
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stitchygreyanonymouse

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[snip for length]

I don't agree with this. We've got pro football, pro baseball, pro soccer, NASCAR track, a minor league hockey team, an indoor football league, a nationally known roller derby team, and a fairly good AA baseball team that I can think of. There's a major university with a decent sports program within an hour's drive from my house. That's the sports I can think of off the top of my head. I won't say I know the rules to all of them or could list off the team names, but they're ALL locally-popular sports franchises, and outside of the University teams they all fall under the guise of "professional", as in people get paid to do this and make a living from it.

I’m trying to think of how you could live in the city and *not* know that the NFL, NBA, and MLB teams are there, though. I mean no snark. While yes, the rest that you named off are also considered pro, the names of NFL, NBA, and MLB teams in their hometowns in the US should be common knowledge. I mean, even the Walmarts have licensed clothing from those teams (and major universities, a lot of the time).

Now, if you’re in a town way outside of the city, I don't think you'd need to be familiar with the nearest big city’s sports teams, but you cannot escape references to the big three sports leagues’ teams in their hometown. References are everywhere. That doesn't mean you even need to know how good (or not) they are, or any rules for the sport, but name and logo recognition seems inescapable.

--------------------------------

I never realized how much maintenance cleaning was needed in a house until recently. I’m guessing we just never did it at my parents’, and never saw my grandparents do it, but things like dusting between the staircase spindles, wiping off window sills, and wiping down baseboards once a year, and such. I guess it just never occurred to me that you needed to do those things. Actually, there's a lot of cleaning stuff that I had to learn as an adult…

ed. to make the sports thing less geographically-specific
« Last Edit: June 19, 2013, 01:11:10 PM by stitchygreyanonymouse »