Author Topic: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned  (Read 95704 times)

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TootsNYC

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I kind of disagree about the sports thing.  I'm not a huge sports fan either but I do consider it part of my culture and is thus something that I feel like I should know a little bit about.

I would totally understand if a person from somewhere not the U.S. didn't understand/know about football (U.S. version) and, I hope, people from other countries don't hate on me for not understanding cricket but if a person who is raised in the United States (and was an adult) doesn't know what a touchdown is or the basics of baseball (number of innings, etc.), I would be surprised and I would definitely think of him/her as ignorant about his/her own culture.

Sort of like I would also be surprised if an adult didn't know who Louis Armstrong or Ella Fitzgerald is.  It is our culture--you don't need to be a jazz fan to know the names.

Yes, but knowing exactly what delineates teams in the Stanley Cup is not the same thing as not understanding how goals are scored in hockey, or what the goalkeeper does.

Onyx_TKD

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[snip for length]

I don't agree with this. We've got pro football, pro baseball, pro soccer, NASCAR track, a minor league hockey team, an indoor football league, a nationally known roller derby team, and a fairly good AA baseball team that I can think of. There's a major university with a decent sports program within an hour's drive from my house. That's the sports I can think of off the top of my head. I won't say I know the rules to all of them or could list off the team names, but they're ALL locally-popular sports franchises, and outside of the University teams they all fall under the guise of "professional", as in people get paid to do this and make a living from it.

Iím trying to think of how you could live in the city and *not* know that the NFL, NBA, and MLB teams are there, though. I mean no snark. While yes, the rest that you named off are also considered pro, the names of NFL, NBA, and MLB teams in their hometowns in the US should be common knowledge. I mean, even the Walmarts have licensed clothing from those teams (and major universities, a lot of the time).

Now, if youíre in a town way outside of the city, I don't think you'd need to be familiar with the nearest big cityís sports teams, but you cannot escape references to the big three sports leaguesí teams in their hometown. References are everywhere. That doesn't mean you even need to know how good (or not) they are, or any rules for the sport, but name and logo recognition seems inescapable.

--------------------------------

I never realized how much maintenance cleaning was needed in a house until recently. Iím guessing we just never did it at my parentsí, and never saw my grandparents do it, but things like dusting between the staircase spindles, wiping off window sills, and wiping down baseboards once a year, and such. I guess it just never occurred to me that you needed to do those things. Actually, there's a lot of cleaning stuff that I had to learn as an adultÖ

ed. to make the sports thing less geographically-specific

I understand that you personally can't imagine not knowing this, but I can assure you that it's possible. I live in a large city and before writing this posts I looked up our local pro sports teams on Wikipedia. For the basketball team, I definitely could have identified the team name as being a [MyCity] team, and likely could have dredged up the name from memory if asked what [MyCity]'s team was. I did recognize the other team names, and if someone had asked me what city [LocalTeam] was associated with, I might have remembered that they were [MyCity]'s team, but I certainly wouldn't have been able to name them from memory if asked what [MyCity]'s team was. I have no idea what their logos look like, although it's possible that they'd look familiar if I saw them.

I do not run into references to them everywhere. I don't run into sports talk with people I work or hang out with. I occasionally overhear the sports fans chatting with each other, but that's as far as it goes. Frankly, a lot of them seem to spend more time chatting about the amateur sports they play on than the pro sports they watch. Besides, plenty of them actually follow non-local teams, so hearing the local sports fans chatting about a particular team doesn't necessarily suggest that they're local team. I'm sure that some stores I shop in have local team merchandise, but it's not front-and-center--since I'm not interested, I just walk on by and have no reason to pay attention to the names or logos. I see a lot more merchandise for the local university than I do the local pro sports teams.

I don't understand why this "should" be common knowledge. It may be commonly known in your experience, but it sounds like you think people should learn this information even if they don't happen to pick it up naturally. Why? What's the problem with not knowing or caring? I've never had someone try to talk to me about sports and have a problem with having to clarify that [TeamName] is the local [whatever sport] team.

turnip

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This was a while ago but...

I honestly never knew which finger a wedding/engagement ring went on (obviously they can go wherever, but left ring finger is tradition here) until we were talking about buying one and I had to be sized. Oh, and I thought you wore the engagement ring on one hand and switched it after marriage (which, as it turns out, is tradition in some places/cultures, but not ours).

My then-fiance was astounded -- apparently it's standard to check a person's hand before flirting if you are a single, conscientious person of an age where people are as likely to be married as not.

On the subject of rings, I was at least late teens, early 20s before I found out that it was common for married women to wear both an engagement ring and a wedding ring.  I believed that you got an engagement ring when engaged, then traded it in for a wedding ring.  (Mom never had an engagement ring, but I knew they were a thing so naturally I assumed she traded it in.)

I once listened to a guy go on a long rant about how much people spend on engagement rings - which was his POV, fine, it's not an issue I care about - but then he finished up with "and then they only wear it for a few months until they get married!"

Apparently he really thought that people would spend $$$ on a diamond solitaire, only to take it off and lock in in a cupboard forever once the wedding was over!  Trying not to look too amused, I told him that many woman wear both rings and pointed out a few examples right around us.   I'm not sure I convinced him that a $$$ engagement ring was a good idea, but at least I calmed his outrage a bit. 



P12663

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Normally a person has four fingers on each hand.  There is the first finger on one side and the little finger on the other side with the two middle fingers in between.  There is a rude gesture that can be made by curling all of the fingers into the palm and then raising one of the middle fingers.

My brothers (older brothers, bless their hearts!) taught me to make this gesture.

It was more than three decades later that I learned that there is only one middle finger; the one closest to the little finger is not a middle finge but the ring finger.  And it was this finger that my brothers taught me to raise.

Yes, for thirty-odd years I flipped people off using the wrong finger!

And nobody told me.

KenveeB

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This was a while ago but...

I honestly never knew which finger a wedding/engagement ring went on (obviously they can go wherever, but left ring finger is tradition here) until we were talking about buying one and I had to be sized. Oh, and I thought you wore the engagement ring on one hand and switched it after marriage (which, as it turns out, is tradition in some places/cultures, but not ours).

My then-fiance was astounded -- apparently it's standard to check a person's hand before flirting if you are a single, conscientious person of an age where people are as likely to be married as not.

On the subject of rings, I was at least late teens, early 20s before I found out that it was common for married women to wear both an engagement ring and a wedding ring.  I believed that you got an engagement ring when engaged, then traded it in for a wedding ring.  (Mom never had an engagement ring, but I knew they were a thing so naturally I assumed she traded it in.)

I once listened to a guy go on a long rant about how much people spend on engagement rings - which was his POV, fine, it's not an issue I care about - but then he finished up with "and then they only wear it for a few months until they get married!"

Apparently he really thought that people would spend $$$ on a diamond solitaire, only to take it off and lock in in a cupboard forever once the wedding was over!  Trying not to look too amused, I told him that many woman wear both rings and pointed out a few examples right around us.   I'm not sure I convinced him that a $$$ engagement ring was a good idea, but at least I calmed his outrage a bit.

<splutter> Really?! Wow. I don't think I've known anyone who stopped wearing theirs after the wedding. Most did bridal sets, and the few who didn't wear their engagement ring on the right hand now.

katycoo

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I've had people on my case about not understanding how cricket is played. I live in the middle of the USA, not a country where cricket is popular. The closest I've ever been to a country where cricket was a big deal was a weeklong trip to Italy. Barring that....um, I watch BBC shows? Why would I ever know how cricket was played, or even care?

I live in Australia.  Cricket is huge.  I still don't care how cricket is played (although I gave describing it a crack in a thread here in the past and was suprised by how much I've absorbed by osmosis over the years)

Also, we play 3 football codes (plus soccer) here pretty religiousy.  I could name maybe 10 teams in a pinch, and not be 100% confident on what code they played.

katycoo

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Iím trying to think of how you could live in the city and *not* know that the NFL, NBA, and MLB teams are there, though. I mean no snark.

Is there only 1 major team in each city for each sport?  Here the cities are divided into regions so there are several, not to mention other major cities within the state.

Kaymyth

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[snip for length]

I don't agree with this. We've got pro football, pro baseball, pro soccer, NASCAR track, a minor league hockey team, an indoor football league, a nationally known roller derby team, and a fairly good AA baseball team that I can think of. There's a major university with a decent sports program within an hour's drive from my house. That's the sports I can think of off the top of my head. I won't say I know the rules to all of them or could list off the team names, but they're ALL locally-popular sports franchises, and outside of the University teams they all fall under the guise of "professional", as in people get paid to do this and make a living from it.

Iím trying to think of how you could live in the city and *not* know that the NFL, NBA, and MLB teams are there, though. I mean no snark. While yes, the rest that you named off are also considered pro, the names of NFL, NBA, and MLB teams in their hometowns in the US should be common knowledge. I mean, even the Walmarts have licensed clothing from those teams (and major universities, a lot of the time).

Now, if youíre in a town way outside of the city, I don't think you'd need to be familiar with the nearest big cityís sports teams, but you cannot escape references to the big three sports leaguesí teams in their hometown. References are everywhere. That doesn't mean you even need to know how good (or not) they are, or any rules for the sport, but name and logo recognition seems inescapable.


While this isn't one of the "big three" American sports, I must admit that it took me forever to finally understand that "Sporting KC" is actually the name of my city's local pro soccer team, rather than just the name of the stadium.  You can hear the name bandied about quite a bit without ever picking up enough context to make the specific matchup in your head.



Slartibartfast

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Iím trying to think of how you could live in the city and *not* know that the NFL, NBA, and MLB teams are there, though. I mean no snark.

Is there only 1 major team in each city for each sport?  Here the cities are divided into regions so there are several, not to mention other major cities within the state.

Most cities only have one per sport, if that.  A few cities have two (New York having two baseball teams, for example) but that's the exception.  Using where I grew up (Wisconsin) as an example: Green Bay had the Packers (football), Milwaukee had the Brewers (baseball) and the Bucks (basketball).  Since football was the most talked-about sport, I knew the names of the primary rival teams, but I don't think I could necessarily name rivals for other sports.  Where I live now, we have some minor-league teams, but college football is the big thing - I would expect anyone who had lived here a while to know the basics about Alabama and Auburn (like what the team colors are).

katycoo

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Iím trying to think of how you could live in the city and *not* know that the NFL, NBA, and MLB teams are there, though. I mean no snark.

Is there only 1 major team in each city for each sport?  Here the cities are divided into regions so there are several, not to mention other major cities within the state.

Most cities only have one per sport, if that.  A few cities have two (New York having two baseball teams, for example) but that's the exception.  Using where I grew up (Wisconsin) as an example: Green Bay had the Packers (football), Milwaukee had the Brewers (baseball) and the Bucks (basketball).  Since football was the most talked-about sport, I knew the names of the primary rival teams, but I don't think I could necessarily name rivals for other sports.  Where I live now, we have some minor-league teams, but college football is the big thing - I would expect anyone who had lived here a while to know the basics about Alabama and Auburn (like what the team colors are).

See, here one of the football codes is Rugby League (NRL).  There are 16 teams in the league.  9 of them (I think) are Sydney-based. 

Dindrane

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I think sports are just one of the many, many facets of a particular locations culture that some people happen to be very into, and some people don't.

I think knowing that certain sports exist in your own country is about as far as a person "should" be expected to know something. In other words, as an American, I "should" know that football is a sport that kind of only exists here, that what we call soccer is what everyone else calls football, and that most places also play baseball and basketball.

I consider that to be the same level of knowledge as knowing that Ella Fitzgerald was a jazz singer, or knowing that F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote the Great Gatsby, or knowing that George Gershwin was a 20th century American composer.

But as much as I woulldn't expect someone who isn't into classical music to recognize Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue just by listening to it, I wouldn't expect someone who doesn't particularly care about a sport to know what teams play it or have more than the most rudimentary knowledge of the rules of the game.

There are so many things that, truly, are part of any given country's culture that it's just not reasonable to expect people to have more than an extremely superficial level of knowledge about them. People gravitate towards what interests them. They often forget things they have been taught (either in school or elsewhere) if it has no relevance to their lives.

Also, I live in a city that has no professional sports teams. I know what our minor league baseball team is called only because the baseball stadium is across the street from my apartment and I drive past it to get home. I don't personally follow sports because I don't care to. What I know about the rules of any game I learned in PE while I was in school, and I'm sure I don't remember all of it.


kherbert05

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Normally a person has four fingers on each hand.  There is the first finger on one side and the little finger on the other side with the two middle fingers in between.  There is a rude gesture that can be made by curling all of the fingers into the palm and then raising one of the middle fingers.

My brothers (older brothers, bless their hearts!) taught me to make this gesture.

It was more than three decades later that I learned that there is only one middle finger; the one closest to the little finger is not a middle finge but the ring finger.  And it was this finger that my brothers taught me to raise.

Yes, for thirty-odd years I flipped people off using the wrong finger!

And nobody told me.
My mom was taught to point with her middle finger. The fingers on either side pulled back to the first knuckle from the top. Of course when I hit 4th or 5th grade this became a huge issue for me Mom was flipping people off.


For years I thought it was a Canadian or PEI thing with a generational gap thrown in (Aunts and Uncles do it , but younger ones (grew up in 50's and 60's) less than older depression/WWII Aunts and Uncles. Cousins pretty much don't do it.


Then I started teaching at my current school one of the things we are told is that when a child is a either a recent immigrant or their parents are recent immigrants they will do this because it is impolite/bad luck/your cursing someone if you point with your pointer finger at someone. Thing is our kids are not immigrants from PEI/Canada or even Ireland. They are largely from Mexico and to a lesser amount from Central &/or South America. So now I'm wondering if it is a Catholic thing  - because most of these kids are Roman Catholics.
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snowdragon

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/\ I was raised Catholic ( Polish Catholic) and I have never seen that. In anyone -so I doubt it is something in Catholic dogma.

kherbert05

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Iím trying to think of how you could live in the city and *not* know that the NFL, NBA, and MLB teams are there, though. I mean no snark.

Is there only 1 major team in each city for each sport?  Here the cities are divided into regions so there are several, not to mention other major cities within the state.
I'm in Houston We have
Astros MLB - Baseball
RocketsNBA  - Men's Basket Ball
[size=78%]Texans (NFL)- US Football[/size]
Aeros (AHL)- Hockey
Dynamo MLS - soccer


 


Dallas has
Cowboys (NFL) US football
Mavericks - Men's basket ball
Stars NHL - Hockey
Texas Rangers - Baseball (Based out of Arlington)
FC - Soccer


San Antonio
Spurs - Men's basketball


These are the major leagues. There are many Minor league teams in other cities. Still other cities like Austin or Bryan/College Station have university teams but not pro teams. (Texans will know why I picked those two examples.)
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WillyNilly

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Iím trying to think of how you could live in the city and *not* know that the NFL, NBA, and MLB teams are there, though. I mean no snark.

Is there only 1 major team in each city for each sport?  Here the cities are divided into regions so there are several, not to mention other major cities within the state.

Most cities only have one per sport, if that.  A few cities have two (New York having two baseball teams, for example) but that's the exception.  Using where I grew up (Wisconsin) as an example: Green Bay had the Packers (football), Milwaukee had the Brewers (baseball) and the Bucks (basketball).  Since football was the most talked-about sport, I knew the names of the primary rival teams, but I don't think I could necessarily name rivals for other sports.  Where I live now, we have some minor-league teams, but college football is the big thing - I would expect anyone who had lived here a while to know the basics about Alabama and Auburn (like what the team colors are).

NYC has two of each actually. Two baseball (Mets & Yankees), 2 football (Jets & Giants) and 2 basketball (Knicks and Nets). We only have one hockey team (Rangers) but the Islanders are mighty close by.