Author Topic: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned  (Read 97440 times)

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PastryGoddess

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it wasn't until I was in my 20's and looking at a reindeer that I realized that they were caribou.

Also this symbol>> | << that looks like a small vertical line.  It's called a pipe symbol and I was introduced to it way back in high school 10+ years ago and though it was super cool.  I used to break up text like PastryGoddess | City, State, Zip | 999-999-999. 


Well up until last frickin' year I was copying and pasting it from a symbol website.  And then I looked down at my year old mac and realized...hey I have a pipe symbol above my backwards slash how cool.  And then a couple of days later I was on my 6 year old PC and looked down, lo and behold I had the pipe symbol on that keyboard as well  ::)


I awarded myself the Derp award of the week.

Pen^2

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Sorry, Luci45, I should have said Eurasian elk, which is indeed a synonym for moose. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurasian_elk

You are quite right: a plain old elk isn't the same as a moose. It's apparently the same as a wapiti. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elk

cabbageweevil

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Sorry, Luci45, I should have said Eurasian elk, which is indeed a synonym for moose. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurasian_elk

You are quite right: a plain old elk isn't the same as a moose. It's apparently the same as a wapiti. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elk

I gather that when Europeans (English-speaking) first arrived in North America, the first kind of truly big deer they encountered, was the wapiti; which they called the elk -- after the Eurasian elk, which they knew from back east of the Atlantic.  They later found that the same species as the Eurasian elk, lives in N. America too; so to name that one, they needed to borrow the Native American word for it, "moose".

Dreadful joke, follows -- from "Punch", the British supposedly comical magazine. "Punch" 's humour is in fact often pretty laboured; and was more so, about a hundred years ago -- the date of this offering (which revolves around the peculiarities of the Scottish accent).

There's a cartoon of two loggers, deep in the Canadian forest:  Sandy, an immigrant just off the boat from Scotland, and old-timer Jake.  A moose is walking past, just minding its own business.

Sandy: "Mon !  Whit's yon thing, for heaven's sake?"

Jake: "That's just a young moose -- nothing to worry about."

Sandy: "Och, havers !  If yon's a young moose, then show me ane o' yer auld rats !"

lowspark

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Cougar = Mountain Lion.
I didn't know it was the same as a puma though. So I looked it up.
According to wikipedia:
The cougar (Puma concolor), [is] also known as the mountain lion, puma, panther, mountain cat, or catamount.
That's six different names. Whew!

Carotte

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It's not an expression used in my native tongue so I just found out what a baker's dozen is.
I was perplexed by a poster in another thread mentioning she only got 12 rolls in her dozen and it wasn't what she was expecting, I had a little  :o whaat? moment there.

guihong

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Sorry, Luci45, I should have said Eurasian elk, which is indeed a synonym for moose. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurasian_elk

You are quite right: a plain old elk isn't the same as a moose. It's apparently the same as a wapiti. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elk

I gather that when Europeans (English-speaking) first arrived in North America, the first kind of truly big deer they encountered, was the wapiti; which they called the elk -- after the Eurasian elk, which they knew from back east of the Atlantic.  They later found that the same species as the Eurasian elk, lives in N. America too; so to name that one, they needed to borrow the Native American word for it, "moose".

Dreadful joke, follows -- from "Punch", the British supposedly comical magazine. "Punch" 's humour is in fact often pretty laboured; and was more so, about a hundred years ago -- the date of this offering (which revolves around the peculiarities of the Scottish accent).

There's a cartoon of two loggers, deep in the Canadian forest:  Sandy, an immigrant just off the boat from Scotland, and old-timer Jake.  A moose is walking past, just minding its own business.

Sandy: "Mon !  Whit's yon thing, for heaven's sake?"

Jake: "That's just a young moose -- nothing to worry about."

Sandy: "Och, havers !  If yon's a young moose, then show me ane o' yer auld rats !"

I finally got it, and I even had a Scottish grandmother who still had a burr  :-[.



ladyknight1

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I am constantly amazed by the people who preach the no white anything (flour, rice, sugar, etc) diet, but don't know the reasons behind it.

I still don't understand the reasons behind so many fad diets banning bananas though, as they are the only way I get potassium and keep me from having muscle cramps.

Vall

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it wasn't until I was in my 20's and looking at a reindeer that I realized that they were caribou.

Also this symbol>> | << that looks like a small vertical line.  It's called a pipe symbol and I was introduced to it way back in high school 10+ years ago and though it was super cool.  I used to break up text like PastryGoddess | City, State, Zip | 999-999-999. 


Well up until last frickin' year I was copying and pasting it from a symbol website.  And then I looked down at my year old mac and realized...hey I have a pipe symbol above my backwards slash how cool.  And then a couple of days later I was on my 6 year old PC and looked down, lo and behold I had the pipe symbol on that keyboard as well  ::)


I awarded myself the Derp award of the week.
I didn't know about the pipe symbol until I read your post.  Thanks!

gramma dishes

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it wasn't until I was in my 20's and looking at a reindeer that I realized that they were caribou.

Also this symbol>> | << that looks like a small vertical line.  It's called a pipe symbol and I was introduced to it way back in high school 10+ years ago and though it was super cool.  I used to break up text like PastryGoddess | City, State, Zip | 999-999-999. 


Well up until last frickin' year I was copying and pasting it from a symbol website.  And then I looked down at my year old mac and realized...hey I have a pipe symbol above my backwards slash how cool.  And then a couple of days later I was on my 6 year old PC and looked down, lo and behold I had the pipe symbol on that keyboard as well  ::)


I awarded myself the Derp award of the week.
I didn't know about the pipe symbol until I read your post.  Thanks!

 :(  I've looked and looked.  I don't seem to have one.  I wish I did.  I think it's cool.

ETA:  Oh my goodness!  I just realized it's way over there under the backspace button.  I didn't even know I had a reverse slash!!  Thank you!  I'm going to play with my newly discovered button now.  What a difference a few seconds make!   ;D
« Last Edit: September 11, 2013, 12:50:20 PM by gramma dishes »

Carotte

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it wasn't until I was in my 20's and looking at a reindeer that I realized that they were caribou.

Also this symbol>> | << that looks like a small vertical line.  It's called a pipe symbol and I was introduced to it way back in high school 10+ years ago and though it was super cool.  I used to break up text like PastryGoddess | City, State, Zip | 999-999-999. 


Well up until last frickin' year I was copying and pasting it from a symbol website.  And then I looked down at my year old mac and realized...hey I have a pipe symbol above my backwards slash how cool.  And then a couple of days later I was on my 6 year old PC and looked down, lo and behold I had the pipe symbol on that keyboard as well  ::)


I awarded myself the Derp award of the week.
I didn't know about the pipe symbol until I read your post.  Thanks!

 :(  I've looked and looked.  I don't seem to have one.  I wish I did.  I think it's cool.

ETA:  Oh my goodness!  I just realized it's way over there under the backspace button.  I didn't even know I had a reverse slash!!  Thank you!  I'm going to play with my newly discovered button now.  What a difference a few seconds make!   ;D

I once had to explain my work-with-computers SO that no, I never have any need for a reverse slash and that yes, it took me a few seconds to find it.
He'll use it maybe every other minutes for his work, I use it for making arms in the air smileys: \o/   
or shark attack: (the shark is one the left and the swimmer first looses one arm then gets eaten whole.)

__/\__\o/__
___/\_o/___
________/\_

AstiTheWestie

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Now I am playing with my newly discovered pipe symbol key as well as making sharks. Thanks, guys! If any of my clients call me looking for their jobs, I'll have them call you.  ;D

cwm

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Sorry, Luci45, I should have said Eurasian elk, which is indeed a synonym for moose. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurasian_elk

You are quite right: a plain old elk isn't the same as a moose. It's apparently the same as a wapiti. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elk

I gather that when Europeans (English-speaking) first arrived in North America, the first kind of truly big deer they encountered, was the wapiti; which they called the elk -- after the Eurasian elk, which they knew from back east of the Atlantic.  They later found that the same species as the Eurasian elk, lives in N. America too; so to name that one, they needed to borrow the Native American word for it, "moose".

Dreadful joke, follows -- from "Punch", the British supposedly comical magazine. "Punch" 's humour is in fact often pretty laboured; and was more so, about a hundred years ago -- the date of this offering (which revolves around the peculiarities of the Scottish accent).

There's a cartoon of two loggers, deep in the Canadian forest:  Sandy, an immigrant just off the boat from Scotland, and old-timer Jake.  A moose is walking past, just minding its own business.

Sandy: "Mon !  Whit's yon thing, for heaven's sake?"

Jake: "That's just a young moose -- nothing to worry about."

Sandy: "Och, havers !  If yon's a young moose, then show me ane o' yer auld rats !"

That joke is SOOOO bad...I'm going to have to spread it.

Also, I love the word wapiti. I always went to the zoo when I was in college just go to see the wapiti. When I took friends we'd be walking down the walkway to him. They'd stop and look at the bald eagles, I'd stare at the wapiti.

Actually, I challenged my sister to be a wapiti one year for Halloween. She had almost agreed before she stopped to think and ask what it was. Darn.

Carotte

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Also, I love the word wapiti. I always went to the zoo when I was in college just go to see the wapiti. When I took friends we'd be walking down the walkway to him. They'd stop and look at the bald eagles, I'd stare at the wapiti.

Actually, I challenged my sister to be a wapiti one year for Halloween. She had almost agreed before she stopped to think and ask what it was. Darn.

You know what, Wapiti was the name of a magazine for kids about animals when I was young, but for some reason I thought it was some kind of lemur, I might be mixing it up with another magazine that had a lemur on it...

Syfygeek

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Now I feel really, well, dumb. This morning, in an effort to amaze my BFF, I asked her if she knew Knights in White satin was really Nights in White Satin. She said of course, that's the name on the album.

So then I whipped out the big gun- did you know a gnu and a wildebeest are the same thing? Yep, she knew that too. I've known her since we were 12, how did she know those thing and I didn't?

From the TV show "Great Space Coaster"-
No gnews is good gnews with Gary Gnu
That's my purse! I don't know you!

cabbageweevil

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Also, I love the word wapiti. I always went to the zoo when I was in college just go to see the wapiti. When I took friends we'd be walking down the walkway to him. They'd stop and look at the bald eagles, I'd stare at the wapiti.

Actually, I challenged my sister to be a wapiti one year for Halloween. She had almost agreed before she stopped to think and ask what it was. Darn.

You know what, Wapiti was the name of a magazine for kids about animals when I was young, but for some reason I thought it was some kind of lemur, I might be mixing it up with another magazine that had a lemur on it...

Thoughts prompted, of a very short offering by Ogden Nash.  Good old Ogden -- I doubt whether there was ever a word which defeated him, as regards finding a rhyme.  As with:

Here comes the wapiti;
Hippity-hoppity !