Author Topic: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned  (Read 106974 times)

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Pen^2

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I love this! The poor swimmer! Hahahahaha!

cwm

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Also, I love the word wapiti. I always went to the zoo when I was in college just go to see the wapiti. When I took friends we'd be walking down the walkway to him. They'd stop and look at the bald eagles, I'd stare at the wapiti.

Actually, I challenged my sister to be a wapiti one year for Halloween. She had almost agreed before she stopped to think and ask what it was. Darn.

You know what, Wapiti was the name of a magazine for kids about animals when I was young, but for some reason I thought it was some kind of lemur, I might be mixing it up with another magazine that had a lemur on it...

Thoughts prompted, of a very short offering by Ogden Nash.  Good old Ogden -- I doubt whether there was ever a word which defeated him, as regards finding a rhyme.  As with:

Here comes the wapiti;
Hippity-hoppity !

I would love to see a wapiti go hippity-hoppity. Really. The mental image that evokes....

Lynn2000

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Okay, so does wapiti rhyme with hoppity? Because in my mind I was pronouncing it wah-PEE-tee. Because if I'm going to learn these retrospectively obvious things, I want to learn them correctly! :D
~Lynn2000

Pen^2

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Okay, so does wapiti rhyme with hoppity? Because in my mind I was pronouncing it wah-PEE-tee. Because if I'm going to learn these retrospectively obvious things, I want to learn them correctly! :D

In IPA it's wɒpɪtɪ, so yeah, it rhymes perfectly with "hoppity" (hɒpɪtɪ). A lot of English words that begin with "w-a" are pronounced with "wo", like "was", "want", "Wanda", "Wally", "wand", "wanton", "wander", "watch", "wasp", etc.

Oh, and Syfygeek, to impress your BFF, browse this for a bit if you haven't already: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_common_misconceptions I'm sure you'll find something  ;)

blue2000

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Okay, so does wapiti rhyme with hoppity? Because in my mind I was pronouncing it wah-PEE-tee. Because if I'm going to learn these retrospectively obvious things, I want to learn them correctly! :D

That's how I thought it was pronounced as well. But according to the on-line dictionary, it does rhyme with hoppity.

And now I'm going to have hoppity wapitis in my head all day. ;D I suppose there are worse things...
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Elfmama

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Okay, so does wapiti rhyme with hoppity? Because in my mind I was pronouncing it wah-PEE-tee. Because if I'm going to learn these retrospectively obvious things, I want to learn them correctly! :D

In IPA it's wɒpɪtɪ, so yeah, it rhymes perfectly with "hoppity" (hɒpɪtɪ).
But where are the accented syllables?  Rhythm matters in rhyming, too. "Hoppity" is accented on the first syllable.  "HOP-pit-ee" by that rule doesn't rhyme with Lynn's pronunciation wah-PEE-tee, because hers has the accent on the second syllable, even if the vowel sounds are identical.


Quote
A lot of English words that begin with "w-a" are pronounced with "wo", like "was", "want", "Wanda", "Wally", "wand", "wanton", "wander", "watch", "wasp", etc.
But in my idiom, "wo" would be pronounce "woe", not "wah".  Woesp?  Woenda? Is that how you say them? 
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AuntieA

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Albertan here, and our "second home" is Jasper National Park, which has elk everywhere! Everyone local calls them WAH-pi-tee elk. Rhymes with hoppity.
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Lynn2000

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Well, if they're hoppity wapitis, rhyming and in rhythm (I am now imagining a herd of them leaping like gazelle across the plains), I will try to remember that!  ;D
~Lynn2000

katycoo

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Quote
A lot of English words that begin with "w-a" are pronounced with "wo", like "was", "want", "Wanda", "Wally", "wand", "wanton", "wander", "watch", "wasp", etc.
But in my idiom, "wo" would be pronounce "woe", not "wah".  Woesp?  Woenda? Is that how you say them?

"Woh" not "woe".  Woe almost puts an extra w sound on the end. Wohsp, Wohnda, wohnt.

mrs_deb

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Quote
A lot of English words that begin with "w-a" are pronounced with "wo", like "was", "want", "Wanda", "Wally", "wand", "wanton", "wander", "watch", "wasp", etc.

I pronounce "was" and "want" differently than Wanda, Wally, wand, wanton, wander, watch, wasp.  Was and Want are more like wuzz and wunt.  The other words are more wah.  wahnda, wahlly, etc.  Is this different than others?


Pen^2

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Okay, so does wapiti rhyme with hoppity? Because in my mind I was pronouncing it wah-PEE-tee. Because if I'm going to learn these retrospectively obvious things, I want to learn them correctly! :D

In IPA it's wɒpɪtɪ, so yeah, it rhymes perfectly with "hoppity" (hɒpɪtɪ).
But where are the accented syllables?  Rhythm matters in rhyming, too. "Hoppity" is accented on the first syllable.  "HOP-pit-ee" by that rule doesn't rhyme with Lynn's pronunciation wah-PEE-tee, because hers has the accent on the second syllable, even if the vowel sounds are identical.


Quote
A lot of English words that begin with "w-a" are pronounced with "wo", like "was", "want", "Wanda", "Wally", "wand", "wanton", "wander", "watch", "wasp", etc.
But in my idiom, "wo" would be pronounce "woe", not "wah".  Woesp?  Woenda? Is that how you say them?

My dictionary says "wapiti" is accented on the first syllable like hoppity is, also, so they'd still rhyme. But it's not a word I'm humongously familiar with, so maybe there's a bit of regional variation in where the accent falls, in which case the rhyme wouldn't be as strong.

As others have pointed out, by "wo" I do indeed mean the short "o" vowel sound, giving "wɒ". "o" (written as ɒ) is as in "lot". In received British English, as well as (non-bogan!) Australian English, the above words all begin with wɒ, but as is usual, there is a degree of regional variation in vowel pronunciation. The ɒ in American English alone can become anything form ɔː ("or" as in "for") to ʌ ("u" as in "mud"), so some of the above words will change their pronunciation depending on where the speaker is from. No biggie  :)

katycoo

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Quote
A lot of English words that begin with "w-a" are pronounced with "wo", like "was", "want", "Wanda", "Wally", "wand", "wanton", "wander", "watch", "wasp", etc.

I pronounce "was" and "want" differently than Wanda, Wally, wand, wanton, wander, watch, wasp.  Was and Want are more like wuzz and wunt.  The other words are more wah.  wahnda, wahlly, etc.  Is this different than others?

They've all got the same sound to me.  You must have a different accent.

Ms_Cellany

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Quote
A lot of English words that begin with "w-a" are pronounced with "wo", like "was", "want", "Wanda", "Wally", "wand", "wanton", "wander", "watch", "wasp", etc.

I pronounce "was" and "want" differently than Wanda, Wally, wand, wanton, wander, watch, wasp.  Was and Want are more like wuzz and wunt.  The other words are more wah.  wahnda, wahlly, etc.  Is this different than others?

They've all got the same sound to me.  You must have a different accent.

I'm the same as Elfmama: wuz, wunt, Wahnda, wahsp, wahtch, wahnd.
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