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  • May 21, 2018, 11:34:28 PM

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Author Topic: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned  (Read 283406 times)

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Iris

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As far as I know, "quay" is properly pronounced "key."  From Eric Bogle, The Band Played Waltzing Matilda:

Quote
And as our ship pulled into Circular Quay
I looked at the place where my legs used to be
And thanked Christ there was nobody waiting for me
To grieve, and to mourn, and to pity.

Blows the rhyme scheme right out of the water if it's pronounced "kay" or "kway".

I can second that in Australia, at least, it's definitely 'key'. You would never catch the ferry to Manly from Circular "Kway" or "Kay".

OT - that song never fails to choke me up.
"Can't do anything with children, can you?" the woman said.

Poirot thought you could, but forebore to say so.

Jelaza

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I didn't realise that aluminium foil had a right side out for cooking.

As far as I know it doesn't.

artk2002

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As far as I know, "quay" is properly pronounced "key."  From Eric Bogle, The Band Played Waltzing Matilda:

Quote
And as our ship pulled into Circular Quay
I looked at the place where my legs used to be
And thanked Christ there was nobody waiting for me
To grieve, and to mourn, and to pity.

Blows the rhyme scheme right out of the water if it's pronounced "kay" or "kway".

I can second that in Australia, at least, it's definitely 'key'. You would never catch the ferry to Manly from Circular "Kway" or "Kay".

OT - that song never fails to choke me up.

That one and Green Fields of France. He's brilliant. I was in Sydney many years ago and walked down to Circular Quay from my hotel and just stood there and cried.
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bow lines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.

Delia DeLyons

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I had read Hermione as a 'yooneeq' spelling of Harmony :-/ my family actually had debates over it, since we all read the books together.

The tabs on either end of the plastic wrap (or foil) box to hold the roll in place blew my mind!

Also, the little hook inside my gas compartment door of my car, to hang my gas cap from while fueling - love it!  Took 3+ years of ownership to realize that it was *for* something, and not just an extra metal bit...
Once in a while you get your delight, in the strangest of faces if you look at it right...

Catananche

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The pointy bit on kitchen scissors? You use it to pop the vacuum when a lid is stuck on a glass jar.
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IslandMama

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The pointy bit on kitchen scissors? You use it to pop the vacuum when a lid is stuck on a glass jar.

Or you turn the jar upside down, give it a little shake and turn it right way up and open it.  If you do that then you've pushed the contents into the little air pocket on top and... well, you filled the vacuum.

(My grandmother used to do that, she saved the jars and lids for preserving fruit and making jam and the lids were never quite right if you'd popped the seal with a knife as most people are prone to do)

Catananche

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Or you turn the jar upside down, give it a little shake and turn it right way up and open it.  If you do that then you've pushed the contents into the little air pocket on top and... well, you filled the vacuum.

(My grandmother used to do that, she saved the jars and lids for preserving fruit and making jam and the lids were never quite right if you'd popped the seal with a knife as most people are prone to do)

That doesn't always work, sometimes the contents of the jar refuse to move. I've never ruined a seal with my scissor trick and I've made (and still make!) lots of jams and jellies.
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Thipu1

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I had read Hermione as a 'yooneeq' spelling of Harmony :-/ my family actually had debates over it, since we all read the books together.

The tabs on either end of the plastic wrap (or foil) box to hold the roll in place blew my mind!

Also, the little hook inside my gas compartment door of my car, to hang my gas cap from while fueling - love it!  Took 3+ years of ownership to realize that it was *for* something, and not just an extra metal bit...

I never had a problem with Hermione because I grew up in the generation that saw Hermione Gingold on television.  Also, Hermione was the daughter of Menelaus and Helen in Greek literature.   

marcel

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On the subject of rings, I was at least late teens, early 20s before I found out that it was common for married women to wear both an engagement ring and a wedding ring.  I believed that you got an engagement ring when engaged, then traded it in for a wedding ring.  (Mom never had an engagement ring, but I knew they were a thing so naturally I assumed she traded it in.)
But, are you aware of the fact that there are married people who have neither ring.

(It was only halfway during my brthers reception that I realised that he and his wif hadn't exchanged rings.)
Wherever you go..... There you are.

wx4caster

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I once met someone who said her daughter was called, I think, Ermyone (or rather that's what I heard) after the girl in the Harry Potter books. I often wondered if they would change the pronunciation when they realised it was wrong.

For myself. I know perfectly well how to pronounce quay, but in my head, when I'm reading it will always be kway.

Ermyone or Air-a-m-one would be the French pronunciation of Hermione. Not wrong, just not English.

The name that tripped me up for years was Penelope. It was a light bulb moment realizing it didn't rhyme with cantaloupe.
The days are long but the years are short.

baglady

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I was surprised to discover that Brits pronounce "buoy" like "boy." Here in the states I've always heard/said "boo-ee." That explains the song that contains the line:

"Just then a voice cried out, 'Ahoy!'
And there was me mother just sitting on a buoy
That's meaning a buoy for the ships that sail
And not a boy that's a juvenile male."
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cabbageweevil

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I was surprised to discover that Brits pronounce "buoy" like "boy." Here in the states I've always heard/said "boo-ee." That explains the song that contains the line:

"Just then a voice cried out, 'Ahoy!'
And there was me mother just sitting on a buoy
That's meaning a buoy for the ships that sail
And not a boy that's a juvenile male."

Ah, the song about the ups-and-downs of the chap who looks after the light-ship at the Nore, in the estuary of the River Thames. I've always loved that one.

artk2002

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I was surprised to discover that Brits pronounce "buoy" like "boy." Here in the states I've always heard/said "boo-ee." That explains the song that contains the line:

"Just then a voice cried out, 'Ahoy!'
And there was me mother just sitting on a buoy
That's meaning a buoy for the ships that sail
And not a boy that's a juvenile male."

Ah, the song about the ups-and-downs of the chap who looks after the light-ship at the Nore, in the estuary of the River Thames. I've always loved that one.

There's a version about a lighthouse off of Plymouth called Eddystone Light. In fact the lines quoted above sound more like they come from a variation on The Weaver's performance of Eddystone Light. (Note that the lyrics transcription in that second video is really bad.)
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bow lines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.

baglady

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There are lots of versions of "Eddystone Light." The one I quoted is "Man at the Nore" as sung by John Roberts and Tony Barrand. I'm partial to that one because Bagman sings it, and I'm fortunate to know John and Tony personally. Have a listen here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WURBrx0XiWM
My photography is on Redbubble! Come see: http://www.redbubble.com/people/baglady

katycoo

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As far as I know, "quay" is properly pronounced "key."  From Eric Bogle, The Band Played Waltzing Matilda:

Quote
And as our ship pulled into Circular Quay
I looked at the place where my legs used to be
And thanked Christ there was nobody waiting for me
To grieve, and to mourn, and to pity.

Blows the rhyme scheme right out of the water if it's pronounced "kay" or "kway".

Circular Quay is most definitly pronunced "Key".

Additionally, And the Band Played Waltzing Matilda has got to be rivally I was Only 19 for most depressing song ever.