Author Topic: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned  (Read 116037 times)

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cabbageweevil

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I was surprised to discover that Brits pronounce "buoy" like "boy." Here in the states I've always heard/said "boo-ee." That explains the song that contains the line:

"Just then a voice cried out, 'Ahoy!'
And there was me mother just sitting on a buoy
That's meaning a buoy for the ships that sail
And not a boy that's a juvenile male."

Ah, the song about the ups-and-downs of the chap who looks after the light-ship at the Nore, in the estuary of the River Thames. I've always loved that one.

artk2002

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I was surprised to discover that Brits pronounce "buoy" like "boy." Here in the states I've always heard/said "boo-ee." That explains the song that contains the line:

"Just then a voice cried out, 'Ahoy!'
And there was me mother just sitting on a buoy
That's meaning a buoy for the ships that sail
And not a boy that's a juvenile male."

Ah, the song about the ups-and-downs of the chap who looks after the light-ship at the Nore, in the estuary of the River Thames. I've always loved that one.

There's a version about a lighthouse off of Plymouth called Eddystone Light. In fact the lines quoted above sound more like they come from a variation on The Weaver's performance of Eddystone Light. (Note that the lyrics transcription in that second video is really bad.)
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bow lines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover. -Mark Twain

baglady

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There are lots of versions of "Eddystone Light." The one I quoted is "Man at the Nore" as sung by John Roberts and Tony Barrand. I'm partial to that one because Bagman sings it, and I'm fortunate to know John and Tony personally. Have a listen here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WURBrx0XiWM
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katycoo

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As far as I know, "quay" is properly pronounced "key."  From Eric Bogle, The Band Played Waltzing Matilda:

Quote
And as our ship pulled into Circular Quay
I looked at the place where my legs used to be
And thanked Christ there was nobody waiting for me
To grieve, and to mourn, and to pity.

Blows the rhyme scheme right out of the water if it's pronounced "kay" or "kway".

Circular Quay is most definitly pronunced "Key".

Additionally, And the Band Played Waltzing Matilda has got to be rivally I was Only 19 for most depressing song ever.

katycoo

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I was surprised to discover that Brits pronounce "buoy" like "boy." Here in the states I've always heard/said "boo-ee." That explains the song that contains the line:

"Just then a voice cried out, 'Ahoy!'
And there was me mother just sitting on a buoy
That's meaning a buoy for the ships that sail
And not a boy that's a juvenile male."

Australians too.  I remember watching a USA show (some kind of obstacle challengy thing?) and found the pronounciation Boo-ee rather amusing.

gadget--gal

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Until book 4 (I think) of the Harry Potter series, I had no idea how to pronounce Hermione's name.  One of the character's (Ron?) got a bit drunk and said it very slowly and deliberately:  "Her-MY-oh-NEE", and I was all "... ohhhh."

No one was drunk. :) Hermione was trying to explain the pronunciation to a foreign visitor (Viktor Krum). I already knew it, but only because I'd studied Shakespeare's "A Winter's Tale" a few years before, and the queen there is named Hermione.


See, the funny thing for me was that I'd read "a winter's tale" as a child but never heard the names aloud so I assumed it was pronounced "her-mee-own" until the first Harry Potter film came out

Dazi

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I had no idea about the wine varieties being based on the skins being used or not.  I guess I just assumed it was based on the color of the grape.

Just a curiosity, how do they remove the skins on grapes?  Do they do this before they are squished or squish and strain?
Meditate. Live purely. Quiet the mind. Do your work with mastery. Like the moon, come out from behind the clouds! Shine. ---Gautama Buddah





StarFaerie

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I had no idea about the wine varieties being based on the skins being used or not.  I guess I just assumed it was based on the color of the grape.

Just a curiosity, how do they remove the skins on grapes?  Do they do this before they are squished or squish and strain?

Squish and strain, at least at the wineries I've been too. For some it's squish, strain, start fermentation then add skins back.

PastryGoddess

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I had no idea about the wine varieties being based on the skins being used or not.  I guess I just assumed it was based on the color of the grape.

Just a curiosity, how do they remove the skins on grapes?  Do they do this before they are squished or squish and strain?

Squish and strain, at least at the wineries I've been too. For some it's squish, strain, start fermentation then add skins back.

hehehe..squish and strain....:)

Ok I'm putting my inner 8 year old away

scotcat60

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 I also thought Persephone was pronounced "Percy-phone".

So how do you pronounce "Proserpine"? I have always thought of it as Pros-er-pin-ee, because if its Antigone, Hermione, Athene, Psyche, Chloe, Gethsemine, Melpomine, Andromache etc. all with an elongated e at the end, but I  haveheard it pronounced Pros-er-pine (as in pine tree)

I know she is sometimes called Proserpina  which I assume is Pros-er- pin-ah.

lilfox

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On the subject of rings, I was at least late teens, early 20s before I found out that it was common for married women to wear both an engagement ring and a wedding ring.  I believed that you got an engagement ring when engaged, then traded it in for a wedding ring.  (Mom never had an engagement ring, but I knew they were a thing so naturally I assumed she traded it in.)
But, are you aware of the fact that there are married people who have neither ring.

(It was only halfway during my brthers reception that I realised that he and his wif hadn't exchanged rings.)

Hmm, come to think of it, my dad never wore a ring (he lost it before I was born) so I also didn't know it was common for men to have a wedding ring.  I think I just wasn't very observant!   ;)

My name pronunciation problem was Penelope.  Pen-ah-lope isn't right??

guihong

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You don't want to know how long it finally took to dawn on me that our own Ehellion, Moray, has a picture of a Moray Eel as her avatar.



menley

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On the subject of rings, I was at least late teens, early 20s before I found out that it was common for married women to wear both an engagement ring and a wedding ring.  I believed that you got an engagement ring when engaged, then traded it in for a wedding ring.  (Mom never had an engagement ring, but I knew they were a thing so naturally I assumed she traded it in.)
But, are you aware of the fact that there are married people who have neither ring.

(It was only halfway during my brthers reception that I realised that he and his wif hadn't exchanged rings.)

Hmm, come to think of it, my dad never wore a ring (he lost it before I was born) so I also didn't know it was common for men to have a wedding ring.  I think I just wasn't very observant!   ;)

My name pronunciation problem was Penelope.  Pen-ah-lope isn't right??

It's pronounced Pen-EH-lo-pee. But I always pronounced it the other way until I was like... in my teens, and someone gently corrected me. Whoops.

Cat-Fu

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I just realized recently that I can no longer silently judge people who say "so-and-so is such a trouper" (meaning, an uncomplaining person) (because, you know, it's obviously "trooper").

Now I shall silently judge the people who write "trooper." :P
“Poetry is a sword of lightning, ever unsheathed, which consumes the scabbard that would contain it.” PBS

nuit93

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You don't want to know how long it finally took to dawn on me that our own Ehellion, Moray, has a picture of a Moray Eel as her avatar.

*sings* When you swim in the sea and an eel bites your knee, that's....a moray!