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Author Topic: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned  (Read 283782 times)

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Snooks

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Ambrosia Hino left a stuffed dog behind by accident at a hotel at 8(?) - we had to have it mailed to us so she could sleep.  I think it was a "Pound Puppy" and you could no longer buy them.

She loaned it to her baby brother while he was sick when he was about three or so...no more in the stores and he absolutely fell in love with the thing. 

I went looking and found one - at a store with a play area (quilt, crafting supplies, and framing shop).  The owner's not-so-dear-husband asked for a divorce and she had to sell the business.  I bought the Pound Puppy (not quite the same color) immediately...she has hers and his is somewhere, still packed since the move in 2005 (he was almost twelve and hadn't slept with it for years, but it got a lot of use when he was younger)!

I am not allowed to get rid of it when I find it because it might be needed for a grandbaby...."it's traditional to sleep with Pound Puppy".

*jumpy claps and happy flail*  I love love love Pound Puppies. 

I had passed all my old ones down to my cousin and then they had a fire and were destroyed.  I still miss those guys.

I had one that had puppies. My parents are clearing out the attic so mine may come to light soon. Mom's dreading getting to the stuffed animals because she's convinced things will be living in them, Dad's dreading it because he knows I'll want to keep them all when I see them.

Octavia

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I just found out that the ice in skating rinks is painted white. I mean, I know that logos and markings for hockey games are painted into the ice. But I figured the ice was white because the concrete or whatever underneath it was white. Am I the only person who didn't know this?  :-[
I've learned so much from this forum over the past 10+ years. While not an active poster, I visit practically every day to soak up the wisdom. Many thanks, Ehelldame, for providing one of the most valuable and civil communities on the web!

Elfmama

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  • Derailing threads since 2001!
I just found out that the ice in skating rinks is painted white. I mean, I know that logos and markings for hockey games are painted into the ice. But I figured the ice was white because the concrete or whatever underneath it was white. Am I the only person who didn't know this?  :-[
Nope. I didn't know it either!  And thinking about it, I don't think it can be.  Because unless the Zamboni paints it as well as smoothing the ice, it would be scraped off on the Zamboni's first pass, right?
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
Common sense is not a gift, but a curse.  Because then
you have to deal with all the people who don't have it.
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

Outdoor Girl

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I didn't think the white part was painted, unless it was part of a logo.  When you use the Zamboni to flood the ice, if the water was tinted white, it would obscure the lines and logos.  I suppose it is possible that the base layer is painted white.  And it wouldn't surprise me if the curling ice was painted white.  It isn't flooded the same way a rink is, once the ice is established.
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
Ontario

Octavia

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I didn't think the white part was painted, unless it was part of a logo.  When you use the Zamboni to flood the ice, if the water was tinted white, it would obscure the lines and logos.  I suppose it is possible that the base layer is painted white.  And it wouldn't surprise me if the curling ice was painted white.  It isn't flooded the same way a rink is, once the ice is established.
Yep, the base layer is what's painted white using a big paint sprayer (or in the case of the Sochi Olympic speed skating rink, the inner part is painted light blue while the racing lanes are painted white). Then they paint logos, stripes, etc. Then they add the rest of the water over a couple of days so the painted layer is well-sealed and will last all season. The Zamboni only scrapes up and replenishes the top layer or two of ice, so it never gets down to the paint. I just learned all of this from my hockey player friend.
I've learned so much from this forum over the past 10+ years. While not an active poster, I visit practically every day to soak up the wisdom. Many thanks, Ehelldame, for providing one of the most valuable and civil communities on the web!

Elfmama

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  • Posts: 4595
  • Derailing threads since 2001!
I didn't think the white part was painted, unless it was part of a logo.  When you use the Zamboni to flood the ice, if the water was tinted white, it would obscure the lines and logos.  I suppose it is possible that the base layer is painted white.  And it wouldn't surprise me if the curling ice was painted white.  It isn't flooded the same way a rink is, once the ice is established.
Yep, the base layer is what's painted white using a big paint sprayer (or in the case of the Sochi Olympic speed skating rink, the inner part is painted light blue while the racing lanes are painted white). Then they paint logos, stripes, etc. Then they add the rest of the water over a couple of days so the painted layer is well-sealed and will last all season. The Zamboni only scrapes up and replenishes the top layer or two of ice, so it never gets down to the paint. I just learned all of this from my hockey player friend.
Now that makes a lot more sense!  What kind of paint do they use? 
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
Common sense is not a gift, but a curse.  Because then
you have to deal with all the people who don't have it.
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

Octavia

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  • Posts: 520
I didn't think the white part was painted, unless it was part of a logo.  When you use the Zamboni to flood the ice, if the water was tinted white, it would obscure the lines and logos.  I suppose it is possible that the base layer is painted white.  And it wouldn't surprise me if the curling ice was painted white.  It isn't flooded the same way a rink is, once the ice is established.
Yep, the base layer is what's painted white using a big paint sprayer (or in the case of the Sochi Olympic speed skating rink, the inner part is painted light blue while the racing lanes are painted white). Then they paint logos, stripes, etc. Then they add the rest of the water over a couple of days so the painted layer is well-sealed and will last all season. The Zamboni only scrapes up and replenishes the top layer or two of ice, so it never gets down to the paint. I just learned all of this from my hockey player friend.
Now that makes a lot more sense!  What kind of paint do they use?
I'm so fascinated by the process myself that I went looking for more info. Here is a thorough Youtube video that explains it all - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7hT3yfuLPIU . I think it's really interesting!
I've learned so much from this forum over the past 10+ years. While not an active poster, I visit practically every day to soak up the wisdom. Many thanks, Ehelldame, for providing one of the most valuable and civil communities on the web!

TootsNYC

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Re the boroughs of New York: I was doing a project recently, which proved definitely instructive about Staten Island.  I'd imagined hitherto, that it was a little island rather isolated in the waters generally off New York City.  Turns out that it's bigger than I thought, and markedly closer to mainland New Jersey -- separated from same, basically by narrow creeks -- than to the rest of NY City. One lives and learns...

I love the story of how it ended up in NYC--a rowboat race around the island.

HenrysMom

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Re the boroughs of New York: I was doing a project recently, which proved definitely instructive about Staten Island.  I'd imagined hitherto, that it was a little island rather isolated in the waters generally off New York City.  Turns out that it's bigger than I thought, and markedly closer to mainland New Jersey -- separated from same, basically by narrow creeks -- than to the rest of NY City. One lives and learns...

I love the story of how it ended up in NYC--a rowboat race around the island.

I recently saw an episode of "How the States got their Shapes," focusing on Ellis Island.  I always thought it was in New York, but apparently there was some court fight and the ruling was the main building is in New York, the rest of the island is in New Jersey.

PastryGoddess

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Re the boroughs of New York: I was doing a project recently, which proved definitely instructive about Staten Island.  I'd imagined hitherto, that it was a little island rather isolated in the waters generally off New York City.  Turns out that it's bigger than I thought, and markedly closer to mainland New Jersey -- separated from same, basically by narrow creeks -- than to the rest of NY City. One lives and learns...

I love the story of how it ended up in NYC--a rowboat race around the island.

I recently saw an episode of "How the States got their Shapes," focusing on Ellis Island.  I always thought it was in New York, but apparently there was some court fight and the ruling was the main building is in New York, the rest of the island is in New Jersey.

I love that show :)

cabbageweevil

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Re the boroughs of New York: I was doing a project recently, which proved definitely instructive about Staten Island.  I'd imagined hitherto, that it was a little island rather isolated in the waters generally off New York City.  Turns out that it's bigger than I thought, and markedly closer to mainland New Jersey -- separated from same, basically by narrow creeks -- than to the rest of NY City. One lives and learns...

I love the story of how it ended up in NYC--a rowboat race around the island.

Ah, Captain Christopher Billopp's exploit, isn't that right? (I looked it up.)

Caused to come to mind, a gruesome legend from long ago: supposedly explaining why the badge of Ireland's northernmost province of Ulster, is a red hand.  A tale of rival chieftains racing each other by boat toward the coast of the area -- the first one to lay hand on it, would be acknowledged as its overlord.  One guy, super-keen to win but his boat falling behind, cut his hand off and, with his other arm, threw it forward on to the shore, ahead of his competitors...

jaxsue

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w/ Manhattan:

Manhattan Island is indeed an island.

However, the borough of Manhattan (in NYC's political divisions) comprises the island of Manhattan and a small section of land across the Harlem River that is on the mainland plus a few smaller islands.

Wikipedia has a map.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:New_York_City_location_Manhattan.svg

That tiny bit on the mainland was originally part of the island, but it was difficult to navigate, so they dug the Harlem River Ship Canal, which turned Marble Hill into an island. Later they filled in the original channel of the river itself, joining Marble Hill to the mainland, but they kept the political membership.

Re the boroughs of New York: I was doing a project recently, which proved definitely instructive about Staten Island.  I'd imagined hitherto, that it was a little island rather isolated in the waters generally off New York City.  Turns out that it's bigger than I thought, and markedly closer to mainland New Jersey -- separated from same, basically by narrow creeks -- than to the rest of NY City. One lives and learns...

I moved to this area (NY/ NJ) 7 yrs ago. I had also thought that Staten Island was closer to NY, and much smaller. I was surprised to find out the truth. Now in Central Jersey, I live where I can be in Staten Island in about 7 minutes!

bansidhe

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    • The Menagerie
This is so embarrassing...
For the first year or so that I used Photoshop, the Rotate Canvas dialog box mystified me. It looks like this:


I couldn't figure out what CW and CCW meant, so I'd just click one of them and hope for the best and if it didn't work, I'd cancel the action and click the other one. It was quite annoying, because I use that feature quite frequently and could never remember which one rotated left and which one rotated right.

Finally, one day, I clicked the wrong option for the umpteenth time and grumbled to myself, "I wanted that to go counter-clockwise, not clockwise - - OHHHHH!" 

Hey, it only took me a year to figure out what should have been obvious.  :-[
Esan ozenki!

Arizona

Lynn2000

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Okay, I will top that, because it's only in the last few years that I've realized where I live:P I remembered I was in the "East Central" part of the state because everything is called that... "Covering East Central news" from the TV and newspaper, for example. I did not realize the county I grew up in actually borders the neighboring state--granted we're in the part on the opposite side, but still. We're closer to the neighboring state than we are to a lot of places inside our own state. I had some relatives in the neighboring state and it was always a huge deal to visit them, or for them to come visit us--like, "Okay, gear up, we're going to Neighboring State, do we have food and water, overnight bag..."

Also, there is a large city in my state, and for my entire childhood it was like the city of Oz, shining on the horizon. I think we went there like twice in my life (not counting purely airport trips). I now live even further away from that city... but many people here will drive to that city and back in one day, and don't see it as a big deal at all. It's like two, two and a half hours away. It takes longer to get to my grandma's house (other direction) but we seemed to be able to do that often enough when I was a kid, even a round trip in the same day. So obviously some of that is my parents' reluctance to go to the city, but I looked pretty dumb when I grew up and goggled at people for treating a trip to the city so casually. ::)
~Lynn2000

Iris

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Re the boroughs of New York: I was doing a project recently, which proved definitely instructive about Staten Island.  I'd imagined hitherto, that it was a little island rather isolated in the waters generally off New York City.  Turns out that it's bigger than I thought, and markedly closer to mainland New Jersey -- separated from same, basically by narrow creeks -- than to the rest of NY City. One lives and learns...

I love the story of how it ended up in NYC--a rowboat race around the island.

Ah, Captain Christopher Billopp's exploit, isn't that right? (I looked it up.)

Caused to come to mind, a gruesome legend from long ago: supposedly explaining why the badge of Ireland's northernmost province of Ulster, is a red hand.  A tale of rival chieftains racing each other by boat toward the coast of the area -- the first one to lay hand on it, would be acknowledged as its overlord.  One guy, super-keen to win but his boat falling behind, cut his hand off and, with his other arm, threw it forward on to the shore, ahead of his competitors...

I'm picturing the "defeated" captain standing there, looking at a severed hand, back at the guy, back at the hand, and saying "Okay. Okay, if you want it that badly..." All the while backing sloooowly towards his boat and making frantic hand signals at his crew behind his back to get the boat ready so they could get the heck away from the crazy person...
"Can't do anything with children, can you?" the woman said.

Poirot thought you could, but forebore to say so.