Author Topic: Because its summer, a reminder on drowning  (Read 1878 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

WillyNilly

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 7490
  • Mmmmm, food
    • The World as I Taste It
Because its summer, a reminder on drowning
« on: June 04, 2013, 05:33:13 PM »
http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/family/2013/06/rescuing_drowning_children_how_to_know_when_someone_is_in_trouble_in_the.html

It's so important to learn what drowning looks like (not like it looks on TV!) The water an be fun of course, and refreshing but lets keep it safe.

MOM21SON

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3019
Re: Because its summer, a reminder on drowning
« Reply #1 on: June 04, 2013, 05:35:07 PM »
http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/family/2013/06/rescuing_drowning_children_how_to_know_when_someone_is_in_trouble_in_the.html

It's so important to learn what drowning looks like (not like it looks on TV!) The water an be fun of course, and refreshing but lets keep it safe.

I read this earlier today.  everyone should read it.

Malaika

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 217
Re: Because its summer, a reminder on drowning
« Reply #2 on: June 04, 2013, 07:15:03 PM »
When I was a teenager, I went to one of those giant wave pools.  My sunglasses got knocked off so I dove down to retrieve them before they got lost.  When I came up, I was mis-timed with the waves so I couldn't really get above them.  I went under twice and was probably going under again when a strong man in our group picked me up, lifted my head and shoulders out of the water and helped me move back to the area where I could stand.  I wasn't quite drowning yet but I wasn't that far from it...and just like in the article, I was silent and vertical.  Scary stuff but this is really good information to know.

doodlemor

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2146
Re: Because its summer, a reminder on drowning
« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2013, 10:13:34 PM »
I read another article about a drowning man recently that shows the need to be checked at a hospital if someone nearly drowns. 

The article said that a man was pulled from the water, was rather embarrassed about all the commotion and told everyone that he was fine.  He insisted on going home with his wife.

If my memory is correct his blood oxygen levels were down from his close call, but no one realized this.  The blood levels fell further down at home and he died before help could arrive.  It seems to me that the article said that if blood oxygen levels fall below a certain point it is hard to recover them.  By the time that the guy's wife realized that he was in distress it was already too late.

kherbert05

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 10197
    • Trees downed in my yard by Ike and the clean up
Re: Because its summer, a reminder on drowning
« Reply #4 on: June 04, 2013, 10:57:23 PM »
Some other safety things


Floaties/Waterwings are toys NOT floatation/life saving devices. When I was in upper elementary right at the beginning of summer 3 kids nearly drowned in our swim club pool because of floaties slipping off, deflating. There were banned. In one case where my sister got the little girl's head above water they had slipped to the little girl's wrists and were forcing her under water.


Here I see these swimsuits sold with floats in the chest area. They are also toys and NOT floatation/life saving devices. My Y really discourages them because they way they are constructed they can flip a child face down in the water.


Know what agency certifies floatation/life saving devices in your country and ONLY use those for non-swimmers. In the US it is the Coast Guard. You want a life jacket that will flip the wearer so their face is out of the water. Especially important if they are thrown from a boat or hit their head.


Walk out - swim in. That way you know how deep the water is.




The poster up thread that said something about getting checked out in near drowning cases is right. If the person breaths in water - it can cause a nasty infection/breathing difficulties a little later.


Don't accept "oh he is just playing around" as an excuse. One of the two times I nearly drowned another group of kids were just "playing around" Thing was I was wearing the same swim suit as a girl with the same build, hair color/length as me. So on a lazy river ride they jerked my intertube out from me thinking I was her. I slid off smacked my head and ended up stuck under two adults. Football player sized adults on their tubes. My mouth was millimeters from the surface but I couldn't get above water. 2 alert life guards ran to us and helped the men stand up and while my sister pulled me up out of the water. The water was mid calf at most.


The other time I got knocked by a wave and smacked my head on the sandbar. It doesn't matter how good a swimmer you are if you hit your head hard enough to see stars. My Dad was right there still it took him a moment to find me and pull me up (Galveston water - so silty)

Don't Teach Them For Your Past. Teach Them For Their Future

gollymolly2

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2611
Re: Because its summer, a reminder on drowning
« Reply #5 on: June 04, 2013, 11:15:10 PM »
Wow, kherbert, you have a lot of encounters with drowning!

Always a good reminder to watch out for people in the reminder - thanks for posting the article.

Iris

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3867
Re: Because its summer, a reminder on drowning
« Reply #6 on: June 05, 2013, 04:51:52 AM »
Some other safety things


Floaties/Waterwings are toys NOT floatation/life saving devices. When I was in upper elementary right at the beginning of summer 3 kids nearly drowned in our swim club pool because of floaties slipping off, deflating. There were banned. In one case where my sister got the little girl's head above water they had slipped to the little girl's wrists and were forcing her under water.


Here I see these swimsuits sold with floats in the chest area. They are also toys and NOT floatation/life saving devices. My Y really discourages them because they way they are constructed they can flip a child face down in the water.


[snip]


See, what I read here is When I was in upper elementary right at the beginning of summer 3 kids nearly drowned in our swim club pool because of floaties slipping off, deflating because they weren't being supervised properly.

As a rule of thumb if your child is under 10 they should be under your direct, immediate supervision at all times. If they cannot swim or need floaties to swim they should be *within arm's reach* at all times. Floaties are widely used over here (Australia) to teach kids water confidence and basic 'dog paddle' moves ages 2-4 but everyone knows that you don't leave a kid unsupervised with floaties.

With slightly older kids that can swim, I remember laughing one day because I was at the beach with DD2. It was one of those days when it felt too chilly to swim when you're an adult but at 8 years old you're good to go. So I stood at the water's edge, arms folded against the slight chill, and watched her while she had a short swim. After I called her in I glanced along the beach and noticed a solid line of parents all standing, arms folded, looking with intense concentration at their children. It was so uniform it was hilarious. I have always thought it would have made a great photo.
"Can't do anything with children, can you?" the woman said.

Poirot thought you could, but forebore to say so.

kherbert05

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 10197
    • Trees downed in my yard by Ike and the clean up
Re: Because its summer, a reminder on drowning
« Reply #7 on: June 05, 2013, 05:32:58 AM »
Some other safety things


Floaties/Waterwings are toys NOT floatation/life saving devices. When I was in upper elementary right at the beginning of summer 3 kids nearly drowned in our swim club pool because of floaties slipping off, deflating. There were banned. In one case where my sister got the little girl's head above water they had slipped to the little girl's wrists and were forcing her under water.


Here I see these swimsuits sold with floats in the chest area. They are also toys and NOT floatation/life saving devices. My Y really discourages them because they way they are constructed they can flip a child face down in the water.


[snip]


See, what I read here is When I was in upper elementary right at the beginning of summer 3 kids nearly drowned in our swim club pool because of floaties slipping off, deflating because they weren't being supervised properly.

As a rule of thumb if your child is under 10 they should be under your direct, immediate supervision at all times. If they cannot swim or need floaties to swim they should be *within arm's reach* at all times. Floaties are widely used over here (Australia) to teach kids water confidence and basic 'dog paddle' moves ages 2-4 but everyone knows that you don't leave a kid unsupervised with floaties.

With slightly older kids that can swim, I remember laughing one day because I was at the beach with DD2. It was one of those days when it felt too chilly to swim when you're an adult but at 8 years old you're good to go. So I stood at the water's edge, arms folded against the slight chill, and watched her while she had a short swim. After I called her in I glanced along the beach and noticed a solid line of parents all standing, arms folded, looking with intense concentration at their children. It was so uniform it was hilarious. I have always thought it would have made a great photo.
I agree kids should be supervised. The thing is people believe that floaties are life saving devices, so they relax. Especially at the pool as opposed to open water. A pool full of splashing kids is hard for an untrained person to watch. At our swim club this was especially true because there were no adult swim time/space. There was a completely separate lap pool the adults went to. Most of the above 6 members of the swim team would go to practice then stay to swim with their siblings. There was easily 75 - 100 kids playing in the water.

Also like the info in the Original post said drowning doesn't look like what people expect. The little girl Sis pulled up out of the water wasn't thrashing or screaming for help. The floaties forced her hands above her head and her body under the water. She didn't have enough strength to push her arms down and get her head up. Also floaties make swimming properly almost impossible. I've seen parents only half inflate floaties so the child could swim but have extra buoyancy.This makes them even more dangerous.   A life jacket will let you do a proper stroke though to takes some strength.

Don't Teach Them For Your Past. Teach Them For Their Future

Carotte

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1083
Re: Because its summer, a reminder on drowning
« Reply #8 on: June 05, 2013, 09:26:42 AM »
The kid swim buoy are not life saving devices, even more when they have a seat with the holes for two legs. And that I guess at any age. I almost drowned when I was one or two, in the kiddy pool and in one of those, a bunch of teenagers/donkeys ran through the pool and that was enough to create a wave big enough for me to flip head underwater. My mom had to rescue me and remember this moment as the one the discovered how many insults she could say in english.

Also, around pools, what seems to happen frequently is that if there's bunch of adults and a bunch of kids, the adults will always think someone else is watching the kids. No one watch them, they get into shenanigans and accidents happen. So stay vigilant, if it's possible, close of the pool, remind them why it's important to have an adult present.

Here it's the law since 2006 that pools have to be secured, with an underwater alarm (that sounds if a kid fall into the water), a protective top (that can retain a child), a fence (with a height minimum) or an unclosed space. I can't find how much it helped with cutting down on drowning but they are sensible things to do anyway.

I used to think that it was weird that the first few times I went to my friend's pool (we were 7 or 8) her mother made me wear floaties and gauged my ability to swim before letting me take them off. But now I understand fully why. I had know to swim for a few years already but never thrust a 7 y/old on what he know, too much responsibility and life at stake.

WillyNilly

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 7490
  • Mmmmm, food
    • The World as I Taste It
Re: Because its summer, a reminder on drowning
« Reply #9 on: June 05, 2013, 11:48:02 AM »
Some other safety things


Floaties/Waterwings are toys NOT floatation/life saving devices. When I was in upper elementary right at the beginning of summer 3 kids nearly drowned in our swim club pool because of floaties slipping off, deflating. There were banned. In one case where my sister got the little girl's head above water they had slipped to the little girl's wrists and were forcing her under water.


Here I see these swimsuits sold with floats in the chest area. They are also toys and NOT floatation/life saving devices. My Y really discourages them because they way they are constructed they can flip a child face down in the water.


[snip]


See, what I read here is When I was in upper elementary right at the beginning of summer 3 kids nearly drowned in our swim club pool because of floaties slipping off, deflating because they weren't being supervised properly.

As a rule of thumb if your child is under 10 they should be under your direct, immediate supervision at all times. If they cannot swim or need floaties to swim they should be *within arm's reach* at all times. Floaties are widely used over here (Australia) to teach kids water confidence and basic 'dog paddle' moves ages 2-4 but everyone knows that you don't leave a kid unsupervised with floaties.

With slightly older kids that can swim, I remember laughing one day because I was at the beach with DD2. It was one of those days when it felt too chilly to swim when you're an adult but at 8 years old you're good to go. So I stood at the water's edge, arms folded against the slight chill, and watched her while she had a short swim. After I called her in I glanced along the beach and noticed a solid line of parents all standing, arms folded, looking with intense concentration at their children. It was so uniform it was hilarious. I have always thought it would have made a great photo.

The bolded is exactly why I posted this article. Because the article states (emphasis mine):

In 50 percent of child drownings, adults are nearby; in 10 percent of those, adults are watching but do not know the victim is drowning.

Kids die even when they are being supervised. Parents watch their kids die. The problem is always they aren't being supervised, its that they aren't being supervised properly. Because the parents don't know what drowning looks like.

Betelnut

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3663
Re: Because its summer, a reminder on drowning
« Reply #10 on: June 05, 2013, 12:18:24 PM »
I don't like floaties either.  They are great for playing with your kid and helping with water confidence but you still need to be right there.  I took them off my daughter as soon as we could.  I felt like I was getting too complacent when she had them on.

I am continually amazed at how many kids don't know how to swim and have never had swim lessons.  My daughter is a pretty good swimmer at age seven and has had 1-2 swim lessons every year since she was about 4.  A lot of her friends don't know how to swim at all.  It is just not as much fun to take them swimming as I have to be continually vigilant and the children who don't know how to swim are much more needy.

The linked article is great!  I posted it on my Facebook page and then I was scrolling down, reading other posts, and I saw that my niece had posted it also!  Great minds...
"And thus the whirligig of time brings in his
revenges." -- Feste, Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare.

Native Texan, Marylander currently

MommyPenguin

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4182
    • My blog!
Re: Because its summer, a reminder on drowning
« Reply #11 on: June 05, 2013, 12:27:22 PM »
I read this story every year to remind myself how easy it is to get distracted for a minute (in this case, while everybody is getting out of the pool) and miss that a kid isn't as secure as you think they are, or they go back for something, or whatever).  It also reminds people of the dangers of "dry drowning" (the LIFEGUARD said it was fine to take the kid home, but he probably would have drowned in his sleep because of all the water in his lungs--don't trust the lifeguard, take the kid to the ER).  http://www.confessionsofahomeschooler.com/blog/2010/08/water-safety-awareness-guilt.html

I love the floaties we have, which I think are called "puddle jumpers."  They have hard flotation parts that fit across the chest (not the back) and the upper arms.  They're Coast Guard-certified.  Because the flotation part fits over the chest, they make it hard to get facedown in the water (a kid has to really work at it if they want to try swimming on their chest).  And they can't really slip, as they go over the upper arms and have a strap across the back.  Still, as others have said, they're a tool, but you still have to watch your kids.

Betelnut

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3663
Re: Because its summer, a reminder on drowning
« Reply #12 on: June 05, 2013, 12:53:53 PM »
Plus, you can't really swim with floaties on--thus kids who wear them don't learn.
"And thus the whirligig of time brings in his
revenges." -- Feste, Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare.

Native Texan, Marylander currently

AngelicGamer

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3990
Re: Because its summer, a reminder on drowning
« Reply #13 on: June 05, 2013, 04:01:46 PM »
Thank you for posting this, OP.  I was at a water park a couple of years ago and we went into the wave pool after a couple rides.  Well, I didn't fully realize that I was motion sick so that, plus the wave pool, made it so that my coordination was horrible.  I got a bit too far out and had problems getting back up over the water until a lifeguard jumped in.  The only reason that they didn't rush me to the ER is that I vomited three times and they had a portable device to check my stats.

I was a silent too but I was lucky that my friend was close by (she yelled for the lifeguard and he jumped in at the same time) and the lifeguard was on alert.  It is the fourth scariest moment in my life and I really don't want to repeat it.




"Life's tough, huh?  And then you die." ~ Buck, the Magnificent Seven.

Hollanda

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2546
  • Believe in yourself.
Re: Because its summer, a reminder on drowning
« Reply #14 on: June 05, 2013, 04:21:10 PM »
I'm paranoid about drowning. This time of year over half the autopsy (post Mortems) reports I have to type about children are drownings. I don't want to pass my fears onto DS, but I never let him go in the water, floaties or not. In other words, I'm there holding him, as opposed to never allowing him in the water, which would be silly.  You know, I can swim, as can DH...DH grew up near the sea and has a good strong respect of water. But still, it takes less than a minute for the unthinkable to occur.


Thank you OP for a timely reminder xxx
Time flies like an arrow.
Fruit flies like a banana.