Author Topic: Because its summer, a reminder on drowning  (Read 1964 times)

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ladyknight1

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Re: Because its summer, a reminder on drowning
« Reply #15 on: June 05, 2013, 04:26:54 PM »
We never used the floaties with our son, and he started in the water at 3 months old. My biggest suggestion to any caregiver of a child under age 10 is to be with the child/children while they are in the pool. Too often, distractions keep a caregiver from noticing a child is in harm's way and giving aid in time.

Also, when babysitting or caring for a child who may not be able to swim, do not put yourself in the situation where they are in the water at all.

Adults and teenagers can drown when wading through the water (non-swimmers) and it is devastating. 6 members of a group drowned at a family reunion. http://abcnews.go.com/WN/teens-drown-wading-louisianas-red-river/story?id=11312631

Carotte

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Re: Because its summer, a reminder on drowning
« Reply #16 on: June 05, 2013, 04:57:20 PM »
From Ladyknight link we have a winner for the brain hurt thread, "The most common reason cited by blacks for not knowing how to swim, however, was a fear of drowning."

Last summer SO took me to a stream he always went to with his family when he was a kid.
But because there was only the two of us and the current was way too strong, added to the fact that SO is not a strong swimmer and I'm half his size/weight, aaand we are both blind without glasses, I vetoed the 'lets try to go near that creak down the river that we'll never be able to swim back from'. I'm not sure he realised the potential danger, he had done it plenty of time (but with softer current)

Snooks

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Re: Because its summer, a reminder on drowning
« Reply #17 on: June 05, 2013, 05:07:21 PM »
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Drowning peopleís mouths alternately sink below and reappear above the surface of the water. The mouths of drowning people are not above the surface of the water long enough for them to exhale, inhale, and call out for help. When the drowning peopleís mouths are above the surface, they exhale and inhale quickly as their mouths start to sink below the surface of the water.

This is exactly what happened to me.  I was 19 and an adult on a girl scout camp.  I'm 5'8 and a strong swimmer, the pool was in the back yard of the person who owned the campsite.  I was talking to one of the other leaders and was maybe an inch out of my depth, if that, on a sloping floor.  I probably bobbed up and down three or four times before she realised I was in trouble.  It's scary.

My other scary water experience happened in about 6-8 inches of water at a Disney water park.  It was the one with the big wave pool (Typhoon Lagoon maybe) anyway I decided I'd had enough of jumping in the waves but DH wanted to stay in for another one or two so I moved to the shallow end and sat down.  The strength of the wave was bigger than I realised and it lifted my feet over my head, I smacked my head on the concrete slope and it took me a while to realise what had happened to me.

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Because its summer, a reminder on drowning
« Reply #18 on: June 05, 2013, 05:41:52 PM »
I love swimming, I love the water but I have had a few scary experiences. One was at a waterpark when I was young and I was knocked off one of the floating crocodiles. It took me a while to come to myself.

And I've been "dumped" a few times while at the beach, but I know what to do now. If you do see a wave that's too big to take, you can dive down, hold your nose, grab the sand and let it wash over you. I wish more people knew ou could do this, particularly tourists that I've seen get thrown about.

Parents teaching you cold to swim could be the most valuable thing you teach them. This is not just about having fun in the water or medals or anything this can save their life. I remember being appalled when watching The Bodyguard when discovering that the little boy couldn't swim when there was a pool at his house and the first shot we see of him in the film is him next to it without an adult.

It's not just about being able to swim, it's about having confidence in the water and knowing your limits so that you don't endanger your life or the life of the person who might try and save you. IMHO people who swim at closed beaches despite the warnings deserve what they get.

ladyknight1

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Re: Because its summer, a reminder on drowning
« Reply #19 on: June 05, 2013, 05:52:48 PM »
We have major issues here in Florida with abandoned homes with swimming pools. Many times, the doors don't latch and an unfilled swimming pool is just as dangerous for a child as a swampy, unmaintained pool.  :'(

RingTailedLemur

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Re: Because its summer, a reminder on drowning
« Reply #20 on: June 05, 2013, 06:23:07 PM »
I'm amazed how often I have heard of "throwing someone in the pool" as a fun and normal activity.

For those of us who can't swim, it's fatal.

kherbert05

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Re: Because its summer, a reminder on drowning
« Reply #21 on: June 05, 2013, 09:43:01 PM »
From Ladyknight link we have a winner for the brain hurt thread, "The most common reason cited by blacks for not knowing how to swim, however, was a fear of drowning."

<<Snip>>>
This explanation may be specific to the towns my students are from.


We talked about this in the teacher lounge - after a new teacher asked a veteran teacher, who is black, about a similar comment from a child. (I'm NOT going to swimming lessons (4th grade PE) because blacks don't swim)


She explained back in Jim Crow era blacks didn't have access to pools/swim lessons. They only really had access to the somewhat murky Brazos river. Going to the coast was also a problem because of segregation.  So many blacks didn't learn to swim then if they ended up in deep water (like falling out of a boat) they were more likely to drown. Which lead to superstitious beliefs that they 'couldn't' swim.


It wasn't to the mid 70's that the pools in the area were truly socially intergrated (though legally they had been for years). A good number of our students have grandparents and great grandparents who can't swim and may pass a fear of the water to the children because of that inability. It is dying out. In this case the veteran teacher go the family to allow the child to take swim lessons.


I've heard of a similar mentality among the fishermen, where mom grew up. Water was for working not playing, so many of them drowned after being knocked or washed off deck. There the fear was expressed as The sea was angry at people for playing in here.
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katycoo

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Re: Because its summer, a reminder on drowning
« Reply #22 on: June 05, 2013, 10:06:08 PM »
Mere supervision is unsifficient for a child who cannot independently swim.

If your child requires a flotation device to swim, then you'd better be in the water with them. 

RooRoo

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Re: Because its summer, a reminder on drowning
« Reply #23 on: June 05, 2013, 10:23:14 PM »
Quote
But still, it takes less than a minute for the unthinkable to occur.

This is very true.

My sister and I were wading with her daughter. I think niece was 4 or 5. The water was over her hips but not past her chest. We were all within arm's length of each other - thank God.

I turned my head away for just a few seconds. I turned back and Niece was floating, back up, and limp.

Her little bathing suit had straps that crossed in the back. I grabbed them and yanked. (I was right next to her.) Out she came - and started to shriek.

That's the only time in my life I have been happy to hear that particular noise!

Sis and I spent our summers on a lake - so my mother gave us swimming lessons at the Yacht Club. Smart woman! We also had life jackets we wore every time we got in a boat. Yeah, we whined about that. No, she didn't give in.
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