Author Topic: Security Doors, and the etiquette therof  (Read 3732 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

RebeccainGA

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1207
  • formerly RebeccainAR
Security Doors, and the etiquette therof
« on: June 13, 2013, 03:20:20 PM »
My building is mixed use - multiple tenants, unrelated, on multiple floors. We have security doors to get into the floor (there's a small lobby at the elevators, on each floor) and then on our floor, an additional security door to get into our area (as half the floor is training, and they aren't allowed into our area, as we work with more sensitive info). The area I work in is relatively small - maybe 60 people, 99% of which I can recognize on sight (45 of them are on my team and I work with them regularly).

Two dilemmas come up regularly, and I'm not sure how to handle them.

One is, when I get off the elevators, I often see people standing around, looking bewildered. They are usually here for training, and likely haven't signed in downstairs (they get instructions on where to go when they sign in - it's either left or right, not difficult to follow). They often will try to follow me in (if the security doors there aren't just unlocked - which they are, often, if there's a lot of people on the floor temporarily). Do I hold the door? Direct them downstairs? Ignore them? Ignore them even when they try to follow me in? They are mostly badged (and sometimes uniformed) employees of my company, and are supposed to be on my floor for training, but they haven't followed all the rules.

Two is people I work with in our secured area. This door is ALWAYS locked, and inaccessible except with a badge. I happen to sit near the door. Is it rude to ignore it when someone's knocking on the door, especially when I KNOW they are a real, current, legit employee that's just left their badge when they went to the bathrooms or break room? Is it rude to not hold the door for them when I'm walking in and they are right behind me, with their badge, but haven't swiped it to unlock the door (since it's already open, this wouldn't have any effect - it's already unlocked).

The things I think of when I should be doing other things.... 

WillyNilly

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 7490
  • Mmmmm, food
    • The World as I Taste It
Re: Security Doors, and the etiquette therof
« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2013, 03:35:31 PM »
In the first situation I think its ok to address the person "oh do you not have a badge? Usually trainees are sent instructions to sign in downstairs, they would issue you the badge there which would get you access."

In the second situation, i think its rude to not let someone in if you know they are allowed in - but you should not have to constantly be interrupted to do so. You can make them wait a few minutes as you complete the task you are in the middle of. And if its something they do regularly you can call them out on it "Joe you seem to never bring your badge when you head out for coffee, please start carrying it. It is very disruptive for me to have to listen to the banging and interrupt my work to let you in daily."

NyaChan

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3942
Re: Security Doors, and the etiquette therof
« Reply #2 on: June 13, 2013, 03:35:54 PM »
For the people who are looking bewildered/haven't followed the rules:  Don't need to let them in, but I would direct them to the right place if I had time

For people I know who have just forgotten their card but you know they are allowed in:  Let them in unless they make a regular habit of it. 

For the people with you who have their card but are behind you:  Hold the door open if you know they are allowed in the area. I would think you were rude if you didn't do this for me if you knew I was allowed in there.

Outdoor Girl

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 12864
Re: Security Doors, and the etiquette therof
« Reply #3 on: June 13, 2013, 03:36:32 PM »
In the first instance, I would probably ask them, 'Are you here for the training session?'  If they answer in the affirmative, I'd just tell them, 'You'll need to go back downstairs and sign in at the desk.  They'll direct you to where you need to be.'  I wouldn't break protocol and let them in if they should really be signed into the building.  In the case of an emergency, those sign in lists can be crucial.

In the second instances, in the case of someone you know walking in behind you, I would just hold the door unless the key swipes are being logged for time keeping or other purposes.  In the case of someone tapping on the door because they forgot their swipe card, I would get up and let them in.  But I would do it at a natural break.  So if I was in the middle of typing something, I'd finish the sentance or paragraph before I got up and let them in.  'Sorry, I was in the middle of typing up the TPS report.  Needed to get to the end of my thought!'
I have CDO.  It is like OCD but with the letters in alphabetical order, as they should be.
Ontario

*inviteseller

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1821
  • I am Queen Mommy
Re: Security Doors, and the etiquette therof
« Reply #4 on: June 13, 2013, 03:39:13 PM »
I think for the lost people, a sign should be right where they can see it as they get off the elevator informing them to sign in and get their instructions in the lobby.  For the people knocking..if it is a known co worker, I would let them in.  To sit there while they knock seems a little PA punishment for them accidentally forgetting their badge.

cwm

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2427
Re: Security Doors, and the etiquette therof
« Reply #5 on: June 13, 2013, 03:43:43 PM »
For the trainess I absolutely don't think it's rude or inappropriate to have them go back downstairs to sign in properly. I've been in that situation, and was thankful that someone took the time to direct me to the proper place rather than ignoring me or letting me follow them and get more hopeleslly lost.

In my old building we were on a secure floor, and though there was a way to get upstairs without your badge (walking right past a front desk, but the secretary knew everyone and would stop strangers), they would still come knock on the door near my desk. I'd get up to let them in, but I'd always tease them for being so forgetful and make them promise that they'd let me in next time. I've also had a few people ask to borrow my badge to go for a smoke break or lunch when they forgot those.

As far as holding the door, so long as it's not causing a security issue (as in there are still those trainees that aren't allowed in your area or people you don't know mingling around) then I don't see it as a problem. You'd kind of want them to hold the door for you if they knew you were behind them, right?

PastryGoddess

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4003
    • My Image Portfolio and Store
Re: Security Doors, and the etiquette therof
« Reply #6 on: June 13, 2013, 04:32:58 PM »
I think for the lost people, a sign should be right where they can see it as they get off the elevator informing them to sign in and get their instructions in the lobby.  For the people knocking..if it is a known co worker, I would let them in.  To sit there while they knock seems a little PA punishment for them accidentally forgetting their badge.

People won't read signs if there is a person in front of them.

The people who don't sign in won't follow the directions on the sign because they didn't think it was for them.

The people who have already signed in will come upstairs with their instructions, see the sign, and forget what they were told to do when they signed in. 
My Photography Gallery
http://www.ctartisticphotos.com/

Two Ravens

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2217
  • One for sorrow, Two for mirth...
Re: Security Doors, and the etiquette therof
« Reply #7 on: June 13, 2013, 04:39:02 PM »
I work in a government building with a similar setup, and we are lectured at least once a year never to let anyone in. This is a common why that unauthorized or classified information gets leaked. It's a form of social engineering

artk2002

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 12553
    • The Delian's Commonwealth
Re: Security Doors, and the etiquette therof
« Reply #8 on: June 13, 2013, 05:10:56 PM »
For the people who are looking bewildered/haven't followed the rules:  Don't need to let them in, but I would direct them to the right place if I had time

For people I know who have just forgotten their card but you know they are allowed in:  Let them in unless they make a regular habit of it. 

For the people with you who have their card but are behind you:  Hold the door open if you know they are allowed in the area. I would think you were rude if you didn't do this for me if you knew I was allowed in there.

In the first instance, send them where they need to go (i.e. back to registration.)

In the second and third instances, that may be against the rules and carries potential risk. Where I've worked, there was a "no tailgating" policy. Even if you think you know that they're allowed through, unless you're plugged into the security database directly, you don't know that they are allowed through. Also, security frequently want to know who is in the secured area in case something goes wrong. The security logs when someone badges through gives them that information.

Think of that last bit this way. You see John, who you know is allowed in the secure area so you open the door with your badge and let him through. John then goes to steal a valuable piece of equipment or information. Security looks at the logs for when the equipment disappeared. Who is on the logs? You. Who isn't on the logs? John. Who is in deep doo-doo right away? You.

If someone is forgetting their badge when they go to the bathroom, they can head down to security and get let through, then get the lecture on keeping their badge with them at all times. Lanyards or a belt clip won't ruin someone's outfit. I'm going to let security take the responsibility for letting them in.
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bow lines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover. -Mark Twain

rashea

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 9642
Re: Security Doors, and the etiquette therof
« Reply #9 on: June 13, 2013, 06:26:25 PM »
How else do people get in if they forget to bring their badge? Can security let them in?

Also, does it log? Because in one company I worked in, they kept those records so they could see who was where if something went wrong.
"Manners change, principles don't. It's about treating people with consideration, respect and honesty." Peter Post

Vermont

Palladium

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 145
    • Gemfire Wire Jewellery
Re: Security Doors, and the etiquette therof
« Reply #10 on: June 13, 2013, 09:53:06 PM »
I'd find out from your company/supervisor exactly what the policy is on security and visitors. I work in a goverment department with secure buildings and some secure floors, and obviously a lot of confidential/sensitive info. We are very strictly told we must wear our passes visibly at all times, not to allow people in without passes, no allowing people to follow you in (tailgating), etc. Everyone is supposed to swipe in and out themselves each time for the security log. It's nice to help out people who just didn't know what they should be doing, but if you deal with sensitive information then it's a lot safer to stick to the rules. I'd probably direct visitors back downstairs to sign in properly and get directions.

LadyClaire

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 9843
Re: Security Doors, and the etiquette therof
« Reply #11 on: June 13, 2013, 09:58:10 PM »
I also work in a building that has secured areas and unsecured areas. We have had issues with people who should not be in the secure area getting it because someone holds the door open for them. In one case, it was a co-worker's ex husband who got into the building and caused a very unpleasant situation. In another case, someone who was going around trying to steal money from unattended purses was allowed into the secured area by someone just letting him in without checking if he was supposed to be given access.

If I don't recognize someone, I ask them where they need to be and then direct them down to the front lobby to get properly checked in.

Minmom3

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2353
Re: Security Doors, and the etiquette therof
« Reply #12 on: June 14, 2013, 01:19:36 AM »
In the first situation I think its ok to address the person "oh do you not have a badge? Usually trainees are sent instructions to sign in downstairs, they would issue you the badge there which would get you access."

In the second situation, i think its rude to not let someone in if you know they are allowed in - but you should not have to constantly be interrupted to do so. You can make them wait a few minutes as you complete the task you are in the middle of. And if its something they do regularly you can call them out on it "Joe you seem to never bring your badge when you head out for coffee, please start carrying it. It is very disruptive for me to have to listen to the banging and interrupt my work to let you in daily."

I can say with certainty that at Apple Computer, at least back in the 90's (and I have no reason to think they've loosened it up since then) that badge or no badge, you were NEVER supposed to tailgate or allow it to happen.  Evar!!!!!  Eleventy ever!  Status could change in an hour, and you wouldn't know because it was none of your business.  Layer upon layers of security badge doors.  It isn't rude to refuse to let them in, it's standard business practice in many places.  You're a grown up, you are SUPPOSED to remember your badge at all times, and while you COULD get a temp, it wasn't a 'live' badge, it was just paper, same as with visitors, and you'd have to be escorted everywhere, because the paper didn't open a thing, it just said you were allowed to go see "X person in Y department".  And X had best be with you at all times.  It wasn't quite that draconian if you actually did work there, but you'd get security coming to talk to you if you blew it too many times...
Mother to children and fuzz butts....

DavidH

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1580
Re: Security Doors, and the etiquette therof
« Reply #13 on: June 14, 2013, 04:46:55 AM »
For someone you don't know, even if you know they are there for training, the best plan is to ask them to go down and sign in, etc.

For someone you know, I think it depends on the circumstances.  For example, you see Joe leave and return 5 min later and he knocks, I'd let him in assuming he forgot his badge on a trip to the breakroom.  You go to lunch with Jane and upon return you use your badge to open the door, unless she needs to sign in, I'd let her tailgate.  First thing in the morning or back from vacation, I'd probably say they need to get a temporary badge if they didn't have one. 

I assume that if your company really wanted to log who came and went by their badge swipes they'd use a turnstile or something like that to prevent tailgating. 

Dorrie78

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1259
Re: Security Doors, and the etiquette therof
« Reply #14 on: June 14, 2013, 05:38:46 AM »
On the issue of letting someone in who is knocking, wouldn't many of these security doors be solid with no windows? How would you know who is knocking without getting up and opening the door to look? I certainly wouldn't do that for my personal security reasons, much less company policy. If the door is glass and the OP is in clear view of it from her office, then it definitely gets more awkward and I might suggest that she clarifies with HR about any official policy (as have been described at Apple, etc.). If she is in view, and there is no policy against this, and she wants to ignore it, maybe headphones or a sudden important phone call that can't be interrupted? I would be very irritated if people expected me to jump up and down all day to let them in a door because they forgot their keys - unless that we're my job, of course!!