Author Topic: Interesting Reading From Cracked  (Read 2364 times)

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FOSTER

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Interesting Reading From Cracked
« on: June 19, 2013, 02:13:32 PM »
This article made me wonder- is it ever okay to gently question or call someone out if you think they're faking or self-diagnosing an actual illness, given that when they do, it makes it harder for individuals who actually suffer from those illnesses?

http://www.cracked.com/blog/6-real-diseases-that-have-somehow-become-trendy/

Camarynne

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Re: Interesting Reading From Cracked
« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2013, 02:29:26 PM »
Well, if they brought it up, I would think it would be ok. As in..."I've wondered how they diagnose that. What did your doctor do?" Them: "Mumble, mumble" You: "Then how do you know you have it? I sure would want a doctor's opinion, myself!"   Something like that. I do have Asperger's.  Independently diagnosed by a doctor and a psychologist. If someone asks, I have no problem discussing it with them, in order to increase understanding.  It frustrates me that people want to fake it...it makes it much harder for those of us who have to deal with it in everyday life.

Just my two cents worth  :)
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Isilleke

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Re: Interesting Reading From Cracked
« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2013, 02:43:39 PM »
Well, if they brought it up, I would think it would be OK. As in..."I've wondered how they diagnose that. What did your doctor do?" Them: "Mumble, mumble" You: "Then how do you know you have it? I sure would want a doctor's opinion, myself!"   Something like that. I do have Asperger's.  Independently diagnosed by a doctor and a psychologist. If someone asks, I have no problem discussing it with them, in order to increase understanding.  It frustrates me that people want to fake it...it makes it much harder for those of us who have to deal with it in everyday life.

Just my two cents worth  :)

I already do this apparently: when people tell me about stuff like this, I start asking those kind of questions. Not to call them out or anything, it's just that when people tell you something like that, I feel it's a nice way to show them you aren't judging them and/or you want to understand them even better.

TurtleDove

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Re: Interesting Reading From Cracked
« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2013, 02:46:52 PM »
I tend to not interact (intentionally) with drama seekers or people who seek excuses for their own shortcomings.  I wouldn't call out a stranger, but if someone in my circle started faking a disease I would talk to them about it, and depending on what happened, would distance myself.  I find it really unattractive to have an "it's not my fault - there is nothing I can do - it's just the way I am" attitude about just about anything.  I don't like to surround myself with people who make excuses, but rather people who find solutions and do the best they can with what they have been given.  In my experience, people who actually do have the diseases listed do not use it as a crutch but actually do what they can to avoid the symptoms.  People who want an excuse play up their symptoms and don't want to find a solution because it takes away their excuse. 

BeagleMommy

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Re: Interesting Reading From Cracked
« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2013, 03:07:20 PM »
I'd love to show this article to the people who swear I can "cure" my diabetes with distilled water and sea salt!

If I'm talking health issues with someone and they say "oh, I have whatever" I usually ask which doctor they see and how they found out they had it.  If they say they saw the symptoms on the internet I just go "Oh, I see" and roll my eyes later.

snowdragon

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Re: Interesting Reading From Cracked
« Reply #5 on: June 19, 2013, 03:22:40 PM »
Why would you call someone out?  I just don't get it.  Do you expect that they will tell you about their testing and medical care?

  I would not answer such questions, and would consider you quite rude for asking about highly personal subjects. How people arrive at their diagnosis can take many paths......some folks with allergies find out when they land in an ER with a reaction...others have testing is either really more 'valid' than another? Some folks don't have either but discuss, the cramping, distress and/or rash they get every time they do/have X....and the dr calls it an allergy/intolerance without testing ( often because insurance won't cover the very expensive testing) but none of this is anyone business but the person involved.  And for me that holds for any condition from Autism to Allergies to nameyourflavoroftheday situation.
  People's medical care/labels/diagnosis are not something they owe explanations for. Anymore we'd ask someone in a wheel chair "Well are you sure you have CP? What tests were done, who made the diagnosis,ect? " or someone with any other condition.  Why anyone would think otherwise is beyond me.   

 

TurtleDove

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Re: Interesting Reading From Cracked
« Reply #6 on: June 19, 2013, 03:42:53 PM »
snowdragon, I don't think anyone is discussing calling someone out who is quietly going about their business.  The article talks about people who bring their "disease" to the forefront often as a way of excusing their behavior.  Again, I would not call out a stranger, and if someone in my circle were acting like that, well, they wouldn't be in my circle anymore. 

Olympia

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Re: Interesting Reading From Cracked
« Reply #7 on: June 19, 2013, 03:46:08 PM »
Why would you call someone out?  I just don't get it.  Do you expect that they will tell you about their testing and medical care?

Every person who runs around proclaiming their self-diagnosed disorder-but-not-really makes it that much harder for people who legitimately have that disorder to be taken seriously.

JeanFromBNA

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Re: Interesting Reading From Cracked
« Reply #8 on: June 19, 2013, 03:46:45 PM »
I don't think that you can call anybody out except your nearest and dearest.  If a casual acquaintance volunteered that information, I would file it away as a telegraph.

In my experience, real sociopaths/psychopaths want you to think that they're normal, and wouldn't announce said diagnosis to anyone unless it could benefit them in some way. Unless you're a jury or a parole board member, I'm not sure where the benefit would be.

snowdragon

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Re: Interesting Reading From Cracked
« Reply #9 on: June 19, 2013, 03:53:08 PM »
Why would you call someone out?  I just don't get it.  Do you expect that they will tell you about their testing and medical care?

Every person who runs around proclaiming their self-diagnosed disorder-but-not-really makes it that much harder for people who legitimately have that disorder to be taken seriously.

  So if I don't think that someone "really" has a disorder I get to call them out on it...really?  I find that to be the height of rudeness - unless you have a medical degree *and* are that person's health care professional it's not your job or right to delve into their medical care. And I say this as someone with several provable allergies ( one of the most common self diagnosed conditions around) - I'd rather deal with the few who claim to be allergic and aren't than have to deal with people deciding they have the right to question me about my medical care.
  And does this new found right to medical information extend to all people and all medical conditions or do some of you folks retain the right not to have your medical info questioned?

TurtleDove

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Re: Interesting Reading From Cracked
« Reply #10 on: June 19, 2013, 03:57:38 PM »
  And does this new found right to medical information extend to all people and all medical conditions or do some of you folks retain the right not to have your medical info questioned?

I think you are imagining a far different scenario than this thread is discussing.  Personally, I don't discuss any medical condition unless I am comfortable discussing it.  If you don't want to discuss a medical condition, don't tell people you have it and don't make it an excuse for poor behavior (general you).