Author Topic: Delusional power freak at work  (Read 15935 times)

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Tabby Uprising

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Re: Delusional power freak at work
« Reply #15 on: June 24, 2013, 09:40:06 AM »
I think other posters have given some good advice, but please do not use the phrase "hostile working environment".  We can all say this guy is being hostile and it is taking place in your work environment, but the term "hostile working environment" has a specific legal definition.  The biggest key factor is it has to be discriminatory based upon a protected class in order to qualify.  That doesn't appear to be the case here.


If you use that phrase with your boss you will risk looking uninformed and as though you are going to take legal action against him which is probably not how you want to start off the conversation. 

gramma dishes

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Re: Delusional power freak at work
« Reply #16 on: June 24, 2013, 10:00:21 AM »

Personally, I like carrying a small notebook with me ala Shaun of the Dead. When PF starts, I would jot down while writing aloud: "sorry, I just have to make a quick note: twelve fifty two... called away from task by PF, questioned again about misconception..." which will put anyone's hair on end. People generally behave better when they're being monitored, even if only by a piece of paper.

Ooooo ... I really REALLY like this idea!  Brilliant!

I liked the rest of Pen^2's post too.

pierrotlunaire0

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Re: Delusional power freak at work
« Reply #17 on: June 24, 2013, 10:36:05 AM »
I also have to agree that the moment you answer his questions you are validating his behavior.  If he asks you, glance at him, and then say, "I'm sorry, but I am busy working."

If he persists, inform him that he is interfering with you performing your job.
I have enough lithium in my medicine cabinet to power three cars across a sizeable desert.  Which makes me officially...Three Cars Crazy

EllenS

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Re: Delusional power freak at work
« Reply #18 on: June 24, 2013, 10:52:50 AM »
Agree with PP, but I would be very careful not to use any rude language like "shut up"
He also has no authority to summon you into Boss's office for a private conversation.  If he starts in on you, leave.  Just walk away.

Some possible phrases:
"If you want to say something to me, you can say it out here. I want as many witnesses as possible."
"I do not report to you, I report to Boss."
"You should know I have talked to Boss about you interrupting my work.  I am logging how many times you interrupt me and I will be reporting to Boss about it."
"If Boss is not happy with my work product, he can talk to me directly.  Whether you are happy with my work product is irrelevant."
"No. I will not interrupt my work to have an irrelevant conversation with you."

Do not JADE (Justify, Argue, Defend, Explain).  You don't owe him an answer to any question or a response to anything.  Frankly, if you can bring yourself to ignore him completely, or dismiss him with a noncommittal noise and turn away, that is the strongest position you can take.

*inviteseller

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Re: Delusional power freak at work
« Reply #19 on: June 24, 2013, 10:59:48 AM »
I think we have all worked with that person one time or another.  They think just because they are chummy with the boss, they can tell everyone what to do.  And, if it is anything like my power freak co worker, while they are busy nit picking everyone else, they aren't doing any work.  Just keep saying "I am doing my job as boss instructed me."  Do NOT let yourself get called into his office (he has no power to question anything) and tell boss calmly but to the point that you do not appreciate co worker questioning you and your job and it must stop. 

Mine was a kiss you know what and would run to boss lady ALL.THE.TIME about perceived infractions (she was sick of it) and she told me to tell him to knock it off.  Unfortunately the day I did, I did not do it in quite the professional way I should have  ::) but it only slowed him down for a few weeks (If it matters, not only did I have more seniority, but more responsibility and power!)

siamesecat2965

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Re: Delusional power freak at work
« Reply #20 on: June 24, 2013, 12:19:20 PM »

Mine was a kiss you know what and would run to boss lady ALL.THE.TIME about perceived infractions (she was sick of it) and she told me to tell him to knock it off.  Unfortunately the day I did, I did not do it in quite the professional way I should have  ::) but it only slowed him down for a few weeks (If it matters, not only did I have more seniority, but more responsibility and power!)

Why didn't boss lady tell him to knock it off? I would have been kind of irked if my boss pushed that responsiblity off onto me (as he does with other things)

*inviteseller

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Re: Delusional power freak at work
« Reply #21 on: June 24, 2013, 01:05:40 PM »
Because Boss lady was not good with being the boss, hence why I ran the show ::).  I really wish I could have been  bit more nice about it, but I admit to snapping.

Virg

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Re: Delusional power freak at work
« Reply #22 on: June 24, 2013, 01:06:23 PM »
CraftyMom wrote:

"PF then says, "Did you clock out for lunch?" I told him no I had not, as I only took other 15. He was like Oh.. I thought that was the end of it. Then a few minutes later, he starts questioning me about the time I left and "to his calculations I had been gone like 25 mins". I explained what time I had left and returned."

As others pointed out, this is where the conversation jumped the rails.  You have to explain your timeline to your boss.  He's not your boss.  When he says anything about your time line or work or whatever, that's when you point out that he's not your boss, and so it's not his business to calculate your breaks.  Shut him down every time he does this, and he'll either stop doing it or you'll have a good list to take to your real boss to get it fixed.

Virg

TootsNYC

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Re: Delusional power freak at work
« Reply #23 on: June 24, 2013, 01:52:54 PM »
I would definitely go to Boss before him.

and both complain (about him confusing the chain of command, AND about how his interruptions broke your train of thought and interfered with your ability to get your work done)

AND ask him what you should say to coworker if he does this again, because he's done it twice, even after apparently Boss spoke to him (though he probably didn't), and so it's logical to thing he should.

And then, if it does happen again, attack back. He's questioning whether you are doing your work--but when he is bugging you, he isn't doing HIS.

So do not answer any of his questions. Just immediately question him back: "Coworker, supervising me isn't in your job description--how is your project? have you interrupted it? are you going to be able to get it finished?" Every time.

Do not ever answer the substance of his question. Answer every one of his questions or comments with a question of your own. "Is your work done?" "Is this the best use of your time?"

NyaChan

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Re: Delusional power freak at work
« Reply #24 on: June 24, 2013, 02:42:01 PM »
I would also make sure to use the phrase, "he called me into your office to question me"  - that in and of itself shows me the attitude this guy is taking.  What right does he have to call any of his coworkers into the office, especially the boss' office to be questioned or reprimanded?

artk2002

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Re: Delusional power freak at work
« Reply #25 on: June 24, 2013, 04:44:17 PM »
CraftyMom wrote:

"PF then says, "Did you clock out for lunch?" I told him no I had not, as I only took other 15. He was like Oh.. I thought that was the end of it. Then a few minutes later, he starts questioning me about the time I left and "to his calculations I had been gone like 25 mins". I explained what time I had left and returned."

As others pointed out, this is where the conversation jumped the rails.  You have to explain your timeline to your boss.  He's not your boss.  When he says anything about your time line or work or whatever, that's when you point out that he's not your boss, and so it's not his business to calculate your breaks.  Shut him down every time he does this, and he'll either stop doing it or you'll have a good list to take to your real boss to get it fixed.

Virg

Virg and others are right. By giving him an answer other than "that's between boss and me," you told him that he had the right to demand an answer. Set your boundaries -- boss things are for boss only, PF things are for PF. Then follow Toot's great advice and live those boundaries. Give PF the brush-off for anything that isn't really, truly, absolutely his business.
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bow lines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover. -Mark Twain

TootsNYC

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Re: Delusional power freak at work
« Reply #26 on: June 24, 2013, 09:31:44 PM »
Or, if you don't want to answer his question with a question, then still never actually *answer* it, but say, "Coworker, leave me alone, I'm focusing on my work."

He tells you to come into Boss's office to talk to you, say, "No, I'm focusing on my work. Please don't talk to me."

"I don't have time for this--Boss gave me my marching orders for the day, so I'm focusing on my work."

artk2002

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Re: Delusional power freak at work
« Reply #27 on: June 25, 2013, 09:20:19 AM »
Situations like this remind me of a Kipling poem:
Quote
“Pleasant it is for the Little Tin Gods
When great Jove nods;
But Little Tin Gods make their little mistakes
In missing the hour when great Jove wakes.”
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bow lines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover. -Mark Twain

veronaz

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Re: Delusional power freak at work
« Reply #28 on: June 25, 2013, 09:44:25 AM »
I would also make sure to use the phrase, "he called me into your office to question me"  - that in and of itself shows me the attitude this guy is taking.  What right does he have to call any of his coworkers into the office, especially the boss' office to be questioned or reprimanded?

This.

Just because he calls you into an office doesn't mean you have to go.

Just because he asks you questions doesn't mean you have to answer.

I think you need to stop feeding into his little power game.  Try just staring at him for an extended moment, then go back to what you're doing or walk away.

MrTango

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Re: Delusional power freak at work
« Reply #29 on: June 25, 2013, 10:15:56 AM »
I would also make sure to use the phrase, "he called me into your office to question me"  - that in and of itself shows me the attitude this guy is taking.  What right does he have to call any of his coworkers into the office, especially the boss' office to be questioned or reprimanded?

This.

Just because he calls you into an office doesn't mean you have to go.

Just because he asks you questions doesn't mean you have to answer.

I think you need to stop feeding into his little power game. Try just staring at him for an extended moment, then go back to what you're doing or walk away.

Another option is to not even look away from your task, just say "I'm busy here.  If you need something, send me an email and I'll get to it when I have time."

This has two advantages:
1) You can respond when it is convenient for you, and
2) There's a paper trail, which in itself creates two advantages:
    a) He's smart enough to not leave a paper trail, so he never actually bothers emailing you, or
    b) He's delusional enough to think what he's doing is okay, which means you can forward the paper trail to Boss.

ETA: Even better would be to be very blunt with him.  "You are not my boss.  You are not my manager.  I do not report to you.  I am too busy to deal with your ridiculous attempts to micromanage me."

After saying that to him once, respond to any unreasonable requests or demands with a very short "No." (nothing more than that one syllable, ever.)
« Last Edit: June 25, 2013, 10:21:43 AM by MrTango »