Author Topic: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)  (Read 218593 times)

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Outdoor Girl

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #270 on: July 02, 2013, 06:17:09 PM »
A friend of my parents was an avid knitter.  She could take any pattern and resize it or do anything with it she liked.  Her one grandson was a huge fan of teenaged mutant ninja turtles.  She got him to draw her a picture - he was a really good artist - she graphed it and knit him a sweater with his picture on it for Christmas!  She was incredible.
I have CDO.  It is like OCD but with the letters in alphabetical order, as they should be.
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blue2000

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #271 on: July 02, 2013, 06:41:38 PM »
And I tend to be the other way around.  I can sew very well, and so many people say that I'm 'creative', but honestly, I'm a mechanic.  I can follow a pattern. I can pick out a cool fabric and follow a pattern. I can even, sometimes, come up with something from a picture.   But PLEASE, please don't ask me to design something with an offset hem, or off the shoulder, or even try to decide where to put a line of lace.  I simply can NOT make something from nothing.  It doesn't exist in my head.  I need directions and a pattern. 


This is me with crocheting.  I get so many compliments on my scarves and shawls.  I just pick a pretty yarn and follow the pattern until it's done.  I absolutely cannot make anything without a pattern of some kind.

I am the opposite. I suck at following crochet patterns. Most of what I make is pretty much conjured out of thin air. I couldn't even write a pattern because most of the time I don't bother writing down what I did.

Me too. I sewed and knitted for my dolls when I was young, but I can't follow a knitting pattern to save my life. It is easier for me to eyeball it.
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JadeGirl

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #272 on: July 02, 2013, 07:55:56 PM »
I'm an "improver" when it comes to crochet and sewing patterns. Couldn't figure out how to create a pattern, but I am good at tweaking to make an item look nicer (to me) or fit better.

I'm an archer and I fletch my own arrows. I consider this to be a craft as I spend a great deal of time  working on materials and colour scheme, as well as taking pride in a nicely-finished product.

It's important to me that the arrow shafts are carefully cleaned of all remnants of old fletchings but without damaging the shaft surface (some of my arrows are laminated with carbon fibre).. I ensure that the new feathers or plastic vanes are perfectly aligned, colour-co-ordinate with the shafts, wrapping and nocks, and that the colour scheme is harmonious but different enough so I can identify my shafts in a target or field setting. I also take pains to remove any excess glue or fletching tape so that my arrows look neat and if I'm using holographic or reflective materials, this ensures maximum sparkle  :P

I haven't been shooting for long, but it wasn't hard to learn how to fletch and I invested in quality tools and materials.  I bought a cast metal jig that bolts to my craft table instead of a cheaper plastic one, and put the arrow components on individually instead of using an "all in one" load and push device. My way is slower but works well for me.

Thankfully I've only run into a couple of people who have asked me to make arrows for them. You see, it's cheaper to order the components and make them up yourself. Archery shops will charge a minimum fee of $10 per shaft for completed arrows on top of the price of parts and you are limited with respect to fletching options and must order at least 1 dozen. One person even expected me to order the components for him! I would have no idea what to order as you need to know certain information about the person's equipment and body measurements to order the right parts.

My arrows range from about $15 to $50 a shaft for components only. It takes around 15 minutes to complete one new arrow from scratch or to recondition and re-fletch an old shaft. That's actual hands-on time only. I'm planning to start dying and cutting my own feathers soon which will add even more time.

Thankfully it only seems to be newer archers who ask for favours. No I will not make you a dozen arrows for next Saturday. It takes a week for the supplies to arrive and I have other things planned for next Friday night! Plus it took me ages to source the components for my unusual colour scheme. I'll give you pointers but you need to do your own homework.

 I think it's a bit cheeky to ask a fellow newbie for professional services. Yes I picked it up quickly but that's probably because making arrows uses some of the same abilities that I earned over years of doing other crafts. It's about the same level of difficulty as putting on false eye lashes, doing a french manicure or beading with seed beads. Crafty people don't have a craft "gene". It can take months or years of practice and investment in good tools/materials to turn out good quality pieces therefore we don't "owe" the fruits of our labour to anyone who asks!

BB-VA

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #273 on: July 02, 2013, 10:14:21 PM »
Old joke about artistic symbolism:

Little Billy's kindergarten teacher sent a note home to his parents - she was VERY worried about his pictures all being done in black crayon.    The parents became alarmed, and immediately made an appointment with a child psychiatrist.

Billy goes to his appointment, and the psychiatrist goes through all the things that shrinks do to make Billy comfortable, and finally gets to the big questions - was Billy unhappy, were the other kids mean to him, did his parents abuse him, etc. etc. etc.  Billy answers no to all the questions. 

The psychiatrist finally gets fed up at not finding an answer to the stock questions.  In exasperation, he finally asks Billy - WHY are all your pictures done in black?  To which Billy answers, "It's the only crayon I have left."

"The Universe puts us in places where we can learn. They are never easy places, but they are right. Wherever we are, it's the right place and the right time. Pain that sometimes comes is part of the process of constantly being born."
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ladyknight1

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #274 on: July 03, 2013, 09:39:44 AM »
I get annoyed when people admire jewelry I wear (that I make) then comment on how they really like it, but don't want to pay my rates. That is fine, I really don't want to make anything for them.

However, I have invested over $$$$ in my jewelry craft. I craft for myself primarily, as I have seen very few I give pieces to appreciate the time that went into them. I have the right lighting, good quality tools, I refuse to use plastic or acrylic beads, and I have a lot of crystal, pearls, and gemstone beads as well as sterling silver wire and findings.

Shalamar

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #275 on: July 03, 2013, 09:41:39 AM »
Wasn't there a story about a famous author - possibly Isaac Asimov - anonymously sitting in on a university lecture about his work?  If I remember correctly, the instructor was going on and on about the symbolism of this and the allegory of that, and Asimov finally stood up and said "Excuse me - I'm Isaac Asimov, and I didn't put any of that into my book."  The instructor sniffed "Just because you wrote it, doesn't mean you know everything about it."  Asimov sat down and shut up.   :)

Thipu1

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #276 on: July 03, 2013, 09:42:59 AM »
Old joke about artistic symbolism:

Little Billy's kindergarten teacher sent a note home to his parents - she was VERY worried about his pictures all being done in black crayon.    The parents became alarmed, and immediately made an appointment with a child psychiatrist.

Billy goes to his appointment, and the psychiatrist goes through all the things that shrinks do to make Billy comfortable, and finally gets to the big questions - was Billy unhappy, were the other kids mean to him, did his parents abuse him, etc. etc. etc.  Billy answers no to all the questions. 

The psychiatrist finally gets fed up at not finding an answer to the stock questions.  In exasperation,
he finally asks Billy - WHY are all your pictures done in black?  To which Billy answers, "It's the only crayon I have left."

I love this story!

 In the version I heard, young Bobby's last name was 'Zimmerman'. As a result, he was always the
last child to be  called when crayons were distributed. Therefore, the only colors he could use were grey and black.
   

Lynn2000

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #277 on: July 03, 2013, 10:44:56 AM »
My friend Emma is pretty creative and crafty, and very into jewelry and fashion. A while ago she got into making beaded jewelry. I fear she is the kind of crafty person that a lot of people encounter, who makes them think it's okay to be greedy and demanding about crafts, because she doesn't have much spine and absolutely no head for business.

Emma was deeply in debt and had the idea of making and selling jewelry on the side as a way to, specifically, earn extra money. But, she didn't take the cost of the materials she had to buy into account when pricing her pieces, let alone the hours she spent working on them! She started doing this rather complicated thing involving braids of beads that she had copied off a designer's website, where the bracelets and necklaces were selling for something like $200. Then she would sell her versions for $25 or $40 or something like that. Now if the people she was selling to were the type to contemplate paying $200 for a necklace, they would have understood and appreciated the bargain she was giving them, but honestly the people she targeted were more likely to think $25 was pricy for a necklace, and to have never heard of the designer Emma was copying.

She was also insistent on using very pricy materials, like gemstone and Swarovski crystal beads, instead of glass that would have looked perfectly fine, and been more in line with the amount she was charging people. In other words, she didn't charge more for a necklace of real gemstones than she did for one of similarly-colored glass beads. Also, she took custom orders, meaning she ended up buying large packages of beads just to get a handful of specific ones to make one necklace. Sometimes she charged a bit more for those, but never what could actually cover her costs.

She complained to me that she got all kinds of ridiculous requests/demands, people with very specific ideas, people who didn't want to pay the price she charged, people who commissioned her to do custom work then said they didn't like it and gave it back without paying (which is one thing if the work isn't good quality or it was not made as agreed, but quite another if when you finally see it, you just realize you don't like those colors together). Certainly not everyone who gets crazy requests is somehow at fault, but given that Emma usually bent over backwards trying to accommodate them, I have to think she was only perpetuating this behavior in her "customers"...  :P
~Lynn2000

TeamBhakta

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #278 on: July 03, 2013, 10:46:45 AM »
I get annoyed when people admire jewelry I wear (that I make) then comment on how they really like it, but don't want to pay my rates. That is fine, I really don't want to make anything for them.

Are they phrasing it as "Your prices are too high. I would never pay that much" or "I'm afraid that's out of my price range" ? To me those would be two different sentiments. The first being a bit too blunt (unless you directly asked "what would you be willing to pay"), while the other would be acceptable if it was said politely and without "oh my, I could buy that at Walmart for $5."

She started doing this rather complicated thing involving braids of beads that she had copied off a designer's website, where the bracelets and necklaces were selling for something like $200.

She copies another designer's pieces ?  ???
« Last Edit: July 03, 2013, 10:50:49 AM by TeamBhakta »

ladyknight1

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #279 on: July 03, 2013, 11:28:57 AM »
I get annoyed when people admire jewelry I wear (that I make) then comment on how they really like it, but don't want to pay my rates. That is fine, I really don't want to make anything for them.

Are they phrasing it as "Your prices are too high. I would never pay that much" or "I'm afraid that's out of my price range" ? To me those would be two different sentiments. The first being a bit too blunt (unless you directly asked "what would you be willing to pay"), while the other would be acceptable if it was said politely and without "oh my, I could buy that at Walmart for $5."

She started doing this rather complicated thing involving braids of beads that she had copied off a designer's website, where the bracelets and necklaces were selling for something like $200.

She copies another designer's pieces ?  ???

The bolded is what I usually hear.

rose red

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #280 on: July 03, 2013, 11:41:04 AM »
I get annoyed when people admire jewelry I wear (that I make) then comment on how they really like it, but don't want to pay my rates. That is fine, I really don't want to make anything for them.

Are they phrasing it as "Your prices are too high. I would never pay that much" or "I'm afraid that's out of my price range" ? To me those would be two different sentiments. The first being a bit too blunt (unless you directly asked "what would you be willing to pay"), while the other would be acceptable if it was said politely and without "oh my, I could buy that at Walmart for $5."

She started doing this rather complicated thing involving braids of beads that she had copied off a designer's website, where the bracelets and necklaces were selling for something like $200.

She copies another designer's pieces ?  ???

The bolded is what I usually hear.

That jumped out at me too.  She better start checking to see if the designs are copyrighted or patented or whatever the correct word is.

Giraffe, Esq

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #281 on: July 03, 2013, 01:40:56 PM »
All the fundraising auctions reminded me of an experience I had -- as the one asking.

I was helping coordinate a fundraiser for the arts school at which I taught dance.  One of the elements was a silent auction and one of the items up for bid was from a woman who made amazing cheesecakes.  She donated a few for the dessert table at the event and I'd had some of hers before and I was so excited about her item -- she was offering either two full-sized cheesecakes or a cheesecake-making class!

It turned out to be a popular item.  She'd priced it as valued at $50 and once it got up to almost $100, I had to drop out of the bidding.  At the moment, I was unemployed (dance was out for the summer) and just back from a year of working/travelling abroad.  So money was tight.

I told her that the bidding got past my budget, but would she be willing to do a class for me at the price she'd stated as the value?

She said she'd do it for free if I made "a donation" to the arts school!  My mom, two friends, and I went and had a marvelous time and I still use her cheesecake recipe and baking tips.

Even though she was friends with my mom, and not just some random co-volunteer, I would never have contemplated asking her to do a class for me for free, so I was (happily) astonished when she made the offer. 

BB-VA

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #282 on: July 03, 2013, 02:39:26 PM »
Wasn't there a story about a famous author - possibly Isaac Asimov - anonymously sitting in on a university lecture about his work?  If I remember correctly, the instructor was going on and on about the symbolism of this and the allegory of that, and Asimov finally stood up and said "Excuse me - I'm Isaac Asimov, and I didn't put any of that into my book."  The instructor sniffed "Just because you wrote it, doesn't mean you know everything about it."  Asimov sat down and shut up.   :)

A college English instructor told my class a story about a former student who was getting some stories in shape to submit to a publisher.  The student was working with another professor, and had a meeting with that professor next day to go over the stories and put all the symbols in. 

Don't know if it was true or not, but this particular English instructor didn't think much of looking for symbolism in stories.
"The Universe puts us in places where we can learn. They are never easy places, but they are right. Wherever we are, it's the right place and the right time. Pain that sometimes comes is part of the process of constantly being born."
- Delenn to Sheridan: "Babylon 5 - Distant Star"

Lynn2000

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #283 on: July 03, 2013, 03:19:18 PM »
She started doing this rather complicated thing involving braids of beads that she had copied off a designer's website, where the bracelets and necklaces were selling for something like $200.

She copies another designer's pieces ?  ???

Yeah, yet another dodgy aspect to the whole thing. Mostly she was copying their particular technique of braided bead chains as opposed to making exact replicas of each piece. But, she kept going back to the designer's website and showing me how she'd made a pink one, and they had a pink one, and she'd made one with skull beads, because they had one with skull beads. Not only was it a little shady ethically, but again, the people she was selling to couldn't care less that they had something that looked like Designer X's jewelry. Plus, she was good at making original patterns with the same general technique. I think it was just all part of Emma putting emphasis on the wrong parts of the project.
~Lynn2000

eport

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #284 on: July 03, 2013, 04:58:38 PM »
Wasn't there a story about a famous author - possibly Isaac Asimov - anonymously sitting in on a university lecture about his work?  If I remember correctly, the instructor was going on and on about the symbolism of this and the allegory of that, and Asimov finally stood up and said "Excuse me - I'm Isaac Asimov, and I didn't put any of that into my book."  The instructor sniffed "Just because you wrote it, doesn't mean you know everything about it."  Asimov sat down and shut up.   :)

A college English instructor told my class a story about a former student who was getting some stories in shape to submit to a publisher.  The student was working with another professor, and had a meeting with that professor next day to go over the stories and put all the symbols in. 

Don't know if it was true or not, but this particular English instructor didn't think much of looking for symbolism in stories.

I had a lit class in college with a professor who had been a graduate assistant under a very recognizable author who's book we were reading (bonus point were given if we figured out that the prof was thanked in the acknowlegement section in the book  ;)). Several lit majors in the class were discussing a particular part of the chapter we were on and disagree on what the symbolism meant. the discussion grew slightly heated. Then class ended and the prof said we would start with that issue in the next session.

Next session started with the prof saying "Well, I called *author's first name* last night and he was both of those ideas are crap and he choose *item* because it would make sense both for the time period and location." The real lesson we learned that day was that "everything  does not have a hidden meaning" and both the prof and author wanted us to learn that. It was awesome as sometimes I just want to enjoy the story rather than breaking every word apart for a meaning that the author may or may not have intended.