Author Topic: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)  (Read 159377 times)

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wolfie

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #870 on: April 08, 2014, 03:45:44 PM »
I have noticed a few people talking about using washable yarn. What would be the benefits of using unwashable yarn? and does that make it dry clean only?

MariaE

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #871 on: April 08, 2014, 04:07:46 PM »
I have noticed a few people talking about using washable yarn. What would be the benefits of using unwashable yarn? and does that make it dry clean only?

I assume they mean machine-washable, so it's not that the alternative can't be washed at all, it just has to be washed by hand.
 
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jedikaiti

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #872 on: April 08, 2014, 04:26:09 PM »
I have noticed a few people talking about using washable yarn. What would be the benefits of using unwashable yarn? and does that make it dry clean only?

I assume they mean machine-washable, so it's not that the alternative can't be washed at all, it just has to be washed by hand.

That's what I usually mean. I make sure to use machine-washable yarn for any and all baby projects, to make life easier on the parents.
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ladyknight1

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #873 on: April 08, 2014, 10:03:03 PM »
Quote
Yeah, I laugh at what people think something costs vs. what it actually does cost.

Several years ago, I knitted a sleeveless top for my sister-in-law. She chose the color and was thrilled with the finished garment.
My mother saw it and wanted the same top in another color.  I knitted it and mailed it to her.  A few weeks later, I called to be certain Mother got the top. She had. And threw it away because "it was just a piece of home made cr*p". 
"Ummm, no....it was a handcrafted, custom-fit top in the fiber, style and shade you requested."


I have a co-worker who is an absolute joy to work with.  She also was a helicopter mechanic while serving in the military and suffered frostbite on her hands.
In the winter, our offices can be quite chilly.  CW's hands would hurt due to her history. It was difficult for her to work at all.
I knitted a pair of fingerless gloves of a wool blend in her favorite color. She loves those gloves and locks them in her desk when she is not in the office.

Co-worker #2 has the cubicle next to CW. She saw the fingerless gloves and stated her own color preferences for herself, her teen-aged daughter and her mother.  Except she also wanted intarsia of a certain style on one pair, beading on another and a mix of cables and lace on the third.  And they needed to be made of a type of wool she had heard of but never actually touched.
I smiled and told her "I am happy to teach you to knit. My next beginner's class begins on X date at X time at X location. The cost is $XX per person for the month of classes.  I will give you a supply list when you pay the tuition."    >:D

And, for the record, CW#2 is the reason CW has to keep her gloves locked up....they keep getting "borrowed"




And people wonder why I don't knit "on demand"


^ That is why I no longer make jewelry gifts for anyone but my one jewelry making friend. My mother has destroyed too many hand made beaded items because she had to pick at them constantly. My effort and time is worth more that that.

IrishGenes

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #874 on: April 08, 2014, 10:53:26 PM »
A musician responds to a restaurant's online ad for local bands to play.  While it does not explicitly say that it is not a paying gig, no mention of compensation is noted in the ad:  http://i.imgur.com/YZzTBKy.jpg

This felt unnecessarily snarky to me.  Yes, established bands will usually get paid for gigs like that - but there's also a pretty solid tradition of open mic nights and such, where musicians *don't* get paid and *do* perform for free in the hope of selling some CDs and building an audience.  I can understand the snark if the restaurant specifically contacted the musician, but not if they just put out an open call.

I hope you were referring to the ad and not to my comments.  I'm not sure how I was snarky in my post :-\

I agree that the response to the Craigslist ad was a bit much... but there could be a backstory or a history that we're not aware of (even though it's a public forum like Craigslist).

Oops, sorry, yes!  I meant the article, not you  :-[

Okay, good!  :)
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Dindrane

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #875 on: April 09, 2014, 01:31:59 AM »
I have noticed a few people talking about using washable yarn. What would be the benefits of using unwashable yarn? and does that make it dry clean only?

I assume they mean machine-washable, so it's not that the alternative can't be washed at all, it just has to be washed by hand.

I'm pretty sure that's what they mean, too. The advantage of machine-washable yarn is, of course, that it can be washed (and sometimes dried) in machines, so it's easier to care for. However, in order for yarn to be machine-washable, it often needs to incorporate acrylic or other synthetic fibers, which aren't always as nice to work with and may not look as nice or feel as nice in the finished product.

So the advantages to being willing to use hand-wash-only yarn is that you have more choice of fibers, and can use natural ones that don't do well in machine washing. Wool can definitely always be washed, but if you use hot water or agitate it too much, it can start to felt and it will shrink a whole lot. Silk can also be washed, but it shrinks if it comes into contact with heat while wet, and it's delicate. Other natural fibers can be machine washed, but it just depends upon what they are and what they are mixed with. In general, though, it's not the water that does damage to most hand-wash-only yarns...it's either the heat or the agitation of washing/drying. One thing I've noticed, though, is that a lot of the really high end yarns (that feel awesome, look great, are easy to work with, and/or have a wide variety of interesting color choices) just aren't made to be machine-washable.

Whenever I make things like blankets for people, I always put a priority on ease of washing, which means I often use acrylic yarn so it can be machine washed and dried. But for things like hats (which are easy to hand-wash and don't get that dirty most of the time) or clothing for people who don't mind hand-washing, I wouldn't pay much attention to how the yarn needed to be cared for when picking it out. In that case, the color or feel or ease of use for the yarn in question would matter a lot more.


wolfie

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #876 on: April 09, 2014, 09:33:21 AM »
I have noticed a few people talking about using washable yarn. What would be the benefits of using unwashable yarn? and does that make it dry clean only?

I assume they mean machine-washable, so it's not that the alternative can't be washed at all, it just has to be washed by hand.

I'm pretty sure that's what they mean, too. The advantage of machine-washable yarn is, of course, that it can be washed (and sometimes dried) in machines, so it's easier to care for. However, in order for yarn to be machine-washable, it often needs to incorporate acrylic or other synthetic fibers, which aren't always as nice to work with and may not look as nice or feel as nice in the finished product.

So the advantages to being willing to use hand-wash-only yarn is that you have more choice of fibers, and can use natural ones that don't do well in machine washing. Wool can definitely always be washed, but if you use hot water or agitate it too much, it can start to felt and it will shrink a whole lot. Silk can also be washed, but it shrinks if it comes into contact with heat while wet, and it's delicate. Other natural fibers can be machine washed, but it just depends upon what they are and what they are mixed with. In general, though, it's not the water that does damage to most hand-wash-only yarns...it's either the heat or the agitation of washing/drying. One thing I've noticed, though, is that a lot of the really high end yarns (that feel awesome, look great, are easy to work with, and/or have a wide variety of interesting color choices) just aren't made to be machine-washable.

Whenever I make things like blankets for people, I always put a priority on ease of washing, which means I often use acrylic yarn so it can be machine washed and dried. But for things like hats (which are easy to hand-wash and don't get that dirty most of the time) or clothing for people who don't mind hand-washing, I wouldn't pay much attention to how the yarn needed to be cared for when picking it out. In that case, the color or feel or ease of use for the yarn in question would matter a lot more.

okay. I don't hand wash anything - I just throw them in the gentle cycle of the washing machine. A friend made me a blanket for my wedding and for years I didn't use it because I had no idea how to clean it. Finally I decided to just throw it in the wash and if it shrunk/broke so be it. Nothing happened so it must be washable yarn and I am really happy I finally took a chance cause it is my favorite blanket now.

That makes sense. But makes me more wary of hand made things now.... now I have to be afraid of ruining them in the wash.

Dindrane

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #877 on: April 09, 2014, 09:45:51 AM »
A lot of people who make things to give away do use washable yarn, so it's just something you'd want to ask about when they give it to you. Yarn typically comes with the same type of washing instructions as clothing (with the same symbols, even), so they should definitely be able to tell you how to care for it.

Personally, I sometimes prefer synthetic yarns, because I'm rather sensitive to wool. Some wools can be uncomfortable for me to knit or crochet with, because it can irritate my fingers as I'm working. So I would say that a lot of handmade items probably are machine washable (even if they aren't machine dryable), and it's always worth asking about if anyone ever makes something for you.

And honestly, a lot of hand-wash-only yarns would probably be just fine if you washed them in cold water on the gentle/delicates cycle and laid them out flat to dry. That avoids heat, excessive agitation, and distorting the fabric while wet, all of which are the major culprits in ruining knit or crocheted items.


TootsNYC

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #878 on: April 09, 2014, 10:02:11 AM »
Anything that's knit--even storebought sweaters or sweater dresses, plus bras--goes in a net bag, in my house.

Even acrylic yarn can be stretched out of shape, so I just put it all in a net bag which keeps it from getting too twisted and keeps it from tangling with other clothes.

And then I don't bother w/ the gentle cycle; I consider the net bag to *be* the "gentle cycle," bcs it protects the clothes from excess agitation and tangling.

And none of it goes in the dryer; in my house, the net bag is the clue that this item is hung to dry.

GreenHall

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #879 on: April 09, 2014, 10:11:58 AM »

And none of it goes in the dryer; in my house, the net bag is the clue that this item is hung to dry.

If only I could remember/find the net bags when doing laundry that would work great.  I have 3 of the suckers, but they like to travel.  Or I put them in a 'good place for the future' - too bad next week my idea of a great location isn't the same...

Outdoor Girl

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #880 on: April 09, 2014, 10:14:39 AM »

And none of it goes in the dryer; in my house, the net bag is the clue that this item is hung to dry.

If only I could remember/find the net bags when doing laundry that would work great.  I have 3 of the suckers, but they like to travel.  Or I put them in a 'good place for the future' - too bad next week my idea of a great location isn't the same...

In the absence of a net bag, use a pillowcase and tie it closed.  Works great for sweaters, anyway.

Whenever I knit something for someone, I include a ball band with it so they have the washing instructions.
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TootsNYC

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #881 on: April 09, 2014, 10:32:10 AM »

And none of it goes in the dryer; in my house, the net bag is the clue that this item is hung to dry.

If only I could remember/find the net bags when doing laundry that would work great.  I have 3 of the suckers, but they like to travel.  Or I put them in a 'good place for the future' - too bad next week my idea of a great location isn't the same...

Mine go right back into the hamper. That's where "stuff that goes in the washing machine" goes.

As I sort, I set the knits & bras off to the side. When I get to the bottom (where the net bags are), I grab the bags and stuff the knits, etc., into them.

(I also have more than 3... let's not talk about how many of them I have.)

Shalamar

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #882 on: April 09, 2014, 11:10:54 AM »
Quote
And threw it away because "it was just a piece of home made cr*p". 

I ... can't even fathom your mother's rationale about this.   What did she think she was getting when she asked you for that top?   :o

And what a shame that she threw it away!  Someone else would have loved it. 

GlitterIsMyDrug

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #883 on: April 09, 2014, 11:27:45 AM »
So Partner and I are having a friend of my mom's do the minimal tailoring that needs to be done our wedding dresses. Plus adding the little embellishments (color) for each of us. She offered and we sat down and went over what we wanted. We aren't getting married until next year, but she works and we wanted to make sure she had pleanty of time. Also, I really wanted her to be sure about taking this project on.

When we met and went over everything I told her to name her price. First she tried to wave us off but then I said "It's two dresses that need to be taken in and hemmed, plus we both want bits added. I know that's going to be work, you have a full time job, your time is worth it. I trust you can give us a fair price" so she thought about it did some research and is charging us $100 each, so $200 total. Totally worth it to me. And I've checked around, it's very resoniable. So we agreed and she's going to start on them in the next few months (just want to get a little closer to the wedding in case we gain/loose weight).

So I'm telling of this to one of my friends about how great this is and I said "She called me with the price quote, and it's a great deal! I'm so glad this handled, blah, blah, blah" and my friend says "She's charging you? But...it's not like it real work, she has the sewing machine already so she it's not like she has to go buy something. She shouldn't charge you". I once re-strung this friend's guitar after she broke a string. I had the spare string on hand and didn't mind using it for her. That one time. She then came back with her other guitar, her brother's guitar, and told me she had a few friends who needed me to re-string their guitars. All for free of course and using my strings. So I wasn't very shocked to hear her think I should get something for free. I just said "I have no problem paying for things I need and want" and let it drop.

bloo

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #884 on: April 10, 2014, 12:33:06 PM »
That I could live with, Bloo - egg white freezes just fine but yolks don't.  I know, I tried.   :-[

And if you could, you know, pretty please???  post the recipes in the appropriate folder?  Please??   :D

I have an ice cream maker and that sounds yummy!

Julian: I posted the Vanilla Bean Ice Cream recipe in this thread:

http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=49363.0

Still looking for the Peanut Butter Ice Cream one...  :)

Julian I found and posted the Peanut Butter Ice Cream recipe here:
http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=49363.msg3133857#msg3133857