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Author Topic: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)  (Read 738420 times)

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littlelauraj

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #960 on: August 05, 2014, 01:27:16 PM »
I can't tell you that one is better than the other, but some really good examples of why quilting in general is very important to the quilt would be in the book:  http://www.amazon.com/Quilting-Makes-Quilt-Lee-Cleland/dp/1564770753/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1407263189&sr=1-1&keywords=quilting+makes+the+quilt

It's worth a look just for the pretty quilts.

tinkytinky

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #961 on: August 05, 2014, 01:31:11 PM »
hand quilting really is an art form. I have a quilt that my Granny made for me and my sister. It is a white scallopped full-size quilt with pink binding (that must have been a nightmare to bind the scallops). It has Cinderella in the middle running down the stairs and losing her shoe. Every peice of that is done by hand, including the embroidery of the face. It has the clock in the background and the mice at her feet. But the hand quilting is where the real artwork comes in. The stitching outlines different things. There is a pumpkin, a coach, a shoe, a tower clock, some mice,some bows, and a fairy godmother (I think). You can't tell unless you turn it over, that's where the outlines show the best, but it is really a beautiful peice of work. If this quilt were to be made today, I wouldn't expect to pay less than $1000.00 due to the work that went in it.

Onyx_TKD

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #962 on: August 05, 2014, 01:48:32 PM »
hand quilting really is an art form. I have a quilt that my Granny made for me and my sister. It is a white scallopped full-size quilt with pink binding (that must have been a nightmare to bind the scallops). It has Cinderella in the middle running down the stairs and losing her shoe. Every peice of that is done by hand, including the embroidery of the face. It has the clock in the background and the mice at her feet. But the hand quilting is where the real artwork comes in. The stitching outlines different things. There is a pumpkin, a coach, a shoe, a tower clock, some mice,some bows, and a fairy godmother (I think). You can't tell unless you turn it over, that's where the outlines show the best, but it is really a beautiful peice of work. If this quilt were to be made today, I wouldn't expect to pay less than $1000.00 due to the work that went in it.

I guess this is where I'm confused. The artwork you're describing sounds like it's in the pattern of the stitching, i.e., where the lines of stitches go, rather than how the stitching was performed--by hand or by machine. Someone with a sewing machine could follow the same stitching pattern and outline different elements using the machine, right? Or am I misunderstanding the meaning of "hand-quilting"?  ??? When people are talking about hand-quilting, I'm picturing someone literally sitting there with a needle and thread, sewing each stitch by hand (an incredibly laborious process). Is that correct? Or does hand-quilted vs. machine-quilted mean that someone is manually running the quilt through a sewing machine and manually controlling the pattern (still laborious, but not on the same scale as sewing it by hand) versus running it through some kind of automated sewing machine?

Sirius

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #963 on: August 05, 2014, 01:50:21 PM »
That's like the quilt my sister made us for a wedding present.  If you look at that one and then look at the ones she does now, you can see that she's progressed quite a bit as a quilter. 

She told me once about someone asking her to make them a quilted wall hanging like the one in her living room (an abstract peacock done in various shades of blues and purples; very pretty) and offered to pay her "$25" for it.  She has very little tact at times, and she said she told them, "That's almost enough to pay for the batting."  The wall hanging was about 2 feet wide by 4 feet long.  (I'd include a picture, but I don't have one.)

Hillia

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #964 on: August 05, 2014, 02:23:18 PM »
hand quilting really is an art form. I have a quilt that my Granny made for me and my sister. It is a white scallopped full-size quilt with pink binding (that must have been a nightmare to bind the scallops). It has Cinderella in the middle running down the stairs and losing her shoe. Every peice of that is done by hand, including the embroidery of the face. It has the clock in the background and the mice at her feet. But the hand quilting is where the real artwork comes in. The stitching outlines different things. There is a pumpkin, a coach, a shoe, a tower clock, some mice,some bows, and a fairy godmother (I think). You can't tell unless you turn it over, that's where the outlines show the best, but it is really a beautiful peice of work. If this quilt were to be made today, I wouldn't expect to pay less than $1000.00 due to the work that went in it.

I guess this is where I'm confused. The artwork you're describing sounds like it's in the pattern of the stitching, i.e., where the lines of stitches go, rather than how the stitching was performed--by hand or by machine. Someone with a sewing machine could follow the same stitching pattern and outline different elements using the machine, right? Or am I misunderstanding the meaning of "hand-quilting"?  ??? When people are talking about hand-quilting, I'm picturing someone literally sitting there with a needle and thread, sewing each stitch by hand (an incredibly laborious process). Is that correct? Or does hand-quilted vs. machine-quilted mean that someone is manually running the quilt through a sewing machine and manually controlling the pattern (still laborious, but not on the same scale as sewing it by hand) versus running it through some kind of automated sewing machine?

Hand quilting is very laborious, one stitch at a time.  The quilter has to decide what patterns to outline - whether they are elements of the quilt itself (the different geometric shapes or appliques) or just quilted in solid areas (which is what it sounds like tinkytinky's Cinderella quilt - her grandmother basically drew these different images on the quilt by outlining them in thread).  The stitches are put in one at a time, with a needle and thread, and there's a real art to getting them small and uniform when working through two layers of fabric plus the batting.  Some quilting can be done with a machine, running the quilt through a sewing machine or quilting machine.  On a regular sewing machine, the quilter is guiding the fabric through the machine.  On a special quilting machine, the quilter sets the pattern and the machine does it on its own.

Elfmama

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #965 on: August 05, 2014, 03:19:17 PM »
hand quilting really is an art form. I have a quilt that my Granny made for me and my sister. It is a white scallopped full-size quilt with pink binding (that must have been a nightmare to bind the scallops). It has Cinderella in the middle running down the stairs and losing her shoe. Every peice of that is done by hand, including the embroidery of the face. It has the clock in the background and the mice at her feet. But the hand quilting is where the real artwork comes in. The stitching outlines different things. There is a pumpkin, a coach, a shoe, a tower clock, some mice,some bows, and a fairy godmother (I think). You can't tell unless you turn it over, that's where the outlines show the best, but it is really a beautiful peice of work. If this quilt were to be made today, I wouldn't expect to pay less than $1000.00 due to the work that went in it.

I guess this is where I'm confused. The artwork you're describing sounds like it's in the pattern of the stitching, i.e., where the lines of stitches go, rather than how the stitching was performed--by hand or by machine. Someone with a sewing machine could follow the same stitching pattern and outline different elements using the machine, right? Or am I misunderstanding the meaning of "hand-quilting"?  ??? When people are talking about hand-quilting, I'm picturing someone literally sitting there with a needle and thread, sewing each stitch by hand (an incredibly laborious process). Is that correct? Or does hand-quilted vs. machine-quilted mean that someone is manually running the quilt through a sewing machine and manually controlling the pattern (still laborious, but not on the same scale as sewing it by hand) versus running it through some kind of automated sewing machine?

Hand quilting is very laborious, one stitch at a time.  The quilter has to decide what patterns to outline - whether they are elements of the quilt itself (the different geometric shapes or appliques) or just quilted in solid areas (which is what it sounds like tinkytinky's Cinderella quilt - her grandmother basically drew these different images on the quilt by outlining them in thread).  The stitches are put in one at a time, with a needle and thread, and there's a real art to getting them small and uniform when working through two layers of fabric plus the batting.  Some quilting can be done with a machine, running the quilt through a sewing machine or quilting machine.  On a regular sewing machine, the quilter is guiding the fabric through the machine.  On a special quilting machine, the quilter sets the pattern and the machine does it on its own.
Also, certain motifs are easier to do with hand quilting.  With machine quilting, ideally you want a single line that you can quilt without stopping, like this.


 if you have to move to another part of the pattern, you either need to tie the initial thread off or backtrack over a previous line of stitching.  The designer here has absolutely fabulous machine quilting patterns. (No financial interest here, just highlighting a wonderful designer.)


With hand quilting, you can stop and start wherever you need to.  This one would be suitable for hand quilting, very awkward to do by machine.


If you were to try this one by machine, you would have to stop frequently and either tie off what you've done, or backtrack over a previous line of stitching.

Machine quilting is taking over the shows, because most of the big prizes are sponsored by machine manufacturers.
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tinkytinky

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #966 on: August 05, 2014, 03:22:13 PM »
I guess this is where I'm confused. The artwork you're describing sounds like it's in the pattern of the stitching, i.e., where the lines of stitches go, rather than how the stitching was performed--by hand or by machine. Someone with a sewing machine could follow the same stitching pattern and outline different elements using the machine, right? Or am I misunderstanding the meaning of "hand-quilting"?  ??? When people are talking about hand-quilting, I'm picturing someone literally sitting there with a needle and thread, sewing each stitch by hand (an incredibly laborious process). Is that correct? Or does hand-quilted vs. machine-quilted mean that someone is manually running the quilt through a sewing machine and manually controlling the pattern (still laborious, but not on the same scale as sewing it by hand) versus running it through some kind of automated sewing machine?
[/quote]

Hand quilting is very laborious, one stitch at a time.  The quilter has to decide what patterns to outline - whether they are elements of the quilt itself (the different geometric shapes or appliques) or just quilted in solid areas (which is what it sounds like tinkytinky's Cinderella quilt - her grandmother basically drew these different images on the quilt by outlining them in thread).  The stitches are put in one at a time, with a needle and thread, and there's a real art to getting them small and uniform when working through two layers of fabric plus the batting.  Some quilting can be done with a machine, running the quilt through a sewing machine or quilting machine.  On a regular sewing machine, the quilter is guiding the fabric through the machine.  On a special quilting machine, the quilter sets the pattern and the machine does it on its own.
[/quote]

Yes, this exactly! The applique of Cinderella was sewn onto the quilt top by hand, as well as the other figures - the mice, the clock, etc. then the batting and back were placed. I remember Granny using a big hoop that stood in the floor. It is kind of like an embroidery/cross stitch hoop. She had used the washable marking pen to draw the pattern and spent hours and hours stitching/quilting. When you trace the outlines, they are all connected, so it looks like there is no break in it.

In contrast, I have a homemade (not handmade) quilt given to me by another family member. It is beautiful (and warm). It is cut squares of patterned and solid materials with a solid back. Straight sides with contrasting binding and machine quilting. I know the top was worked on for about 3 days, and it took a couple of hours for the machine quilting. This is king sized, and we use it, but it isn't the masterpiece the Cinderella quilt is. The machine stitching is coming out/breaking in spots. the material for the top is starting to rip. I cherish it because it came from family, but not to the extent I cherish the other.

PastryGoddess

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #967 on: August 05, 2014, 03:32:25 PM »
I guess this is where I'm confused. The artwork you're describing sounds like it's in the pattern of the stitching, i.e., where the lines of stitches go, rather than how the stitching was performed--by hand or by machine. Someone with a sewing machine could follow the same stitching pattern and outline different elements using the machine, right? Or am I misunderstanding the meaning of "hand-quilting"?  ??? When people are talking about hand-quilting, I'm picturing someone literally sitting there with a needle and thread, sewing each stitch by hand (an incredibly laborious process). Is that correct? Or does hand-quilted vs. machine-quilted mean that someone is manually running the quilt through a sewing machine and manually controlling the pattern (still laborious, but not on the same scale as sewing it by hand) versus running it through some kind of automated sewing machine?


Hand quilting is sewing everything by hand, not using a machine at all

Machine quilting uses a sewing/quilting machine for a majority or all of the stitching. Sewing/quilting machines can be manual or automatic, but it's still machine quilting

Jocelyn

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #968 on: August 05, 2014, 04:53:30 PM »
Quilts going into contests (I've worked a quilt fair or two) are done with high quality fabrics, batting, and tiny hand stitches - unless they are being judged under a machine quilted category.

I know next to nothing about quilting, so this may be a stupid question (quilters, please don't be insulted by my ignorance!). Are hand-quilted quilts "better" than machine-quilted just in terms of the skill demonstrated and the sentimental value of a completely hand-made piece, or are there other concrete advantages of hand-quilting over machine-quilting? I guess I had always kind of assumed that the main craftwork in the quilt was in the design, piecing together, and choosing the pattern for the stitching, rather than in the stitching process itself. Yet it sounds like this is a very important factor in judging competitive quilts, to the point that people are hired just to do the hand-quilting. Can someone more knowledgeable enlighten me, please?
There used to be a strong prejudice against machine-quilted quilts. It was considered lacking in artistry and the lazy quilter's way of getting the quilt finished. But as with any technology, it's developed past plain lines or big swirly overall designs that have nothing to do with the pattern in the quilt top.
But check out this link:  http://www.craftsy.com/class/ultimate-free-motion-quilting/4270?_ct=sbqii-sqjuweho-dum&_ctp=2

If that design doesn't convince you that machine quilting involves artistry, I'll eat a quilt. (I'm sorry, but I can't get it to copy over here).
Machine quilted quilts may be a bit stronger and more durable, because of the smallness of the stitches. And it's a myth that you can tell if a quilt were made on a treadle machine versus an electric machine: individual machines will stitch more or less evenly, it's not purely a matter of the power source that governs how evenly the machine stitches. Quilters in the 19th century did indeed machine quilt, although it must have taken a very intrepid woman to attempt machine quilting on a treadle with the materials of the 19th century!

Jocelyn

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #969 on: August 05, 2014, 04:58:02 PM »
   On a regular sewing machine, the quilter is guiding the fabric through the machine.  On a special quilting machine, the quilter sets the pattern and the machine does it on its own.
Slight correction: while it is possible to set a quilting machine to use a pantographic pattern automatically, longarm quilters can and do guide their machines, to place the quilting exactly where it needs to be to enhance the design of the quilt top. Of the longarm quilters I know, all will do a pantograph if that's what you want, and it's the cheapest option, but all will make you an offer to design a quilting pattern that is specific to your top- and that's the work they really enjoy doing (and it's not just because they can charge much more for it. ;))_

Jocelyn

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #970 on: August 05, 2014, 04:59:43 PM »
 

She told me once about someone asking her to make them a quilted wall hanging like the one in her living room (an abstract peacock done in various shades of blues and purples; very pretty) and offered to pay her "$25" for it.  She has very little tact at times, and she said she told them, "That's almost enough to pay for the batting."  The wall hanging was about 2 feet wide by 4 feet long.  (I'd include a picture, but I don't have one.)
I don't think it's lacking in tact to let someone know their offer wouldn't come close to covering the materials.
It would be tactless if she did so after laughing uproariously and clinging to the doorjam to keep from falling on the floor.  ::)

Jocelyn

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #971 on: August 05, 2014, 05:04:42 PM »



Hand quilting is sewing everything by hand, not using a machine at all

Machine quilting uses a sewing/quilting machine for a majority or all of the stitching. Sewing/quilting machines can be manual or automatic, but it's still machine quilting

I've never seen the terms defined in this way. Piecing is the sewing together of pieces of fabric to make the quilt top. Quilting is sewing together the three layers of the quilt top, batting and backing fabric.
Both processes, piecing and quilting, can be done either by hand or by machine.
You can find quilts that were hand pieced and machine quilted, machine pieced and hand quilted, or quilts where both processes were done by the same method.

VorFemme

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #972 on: August 05, 2014, 06:32:48 PM »
Quilts going into contests (I've worked a quilt fair or two) are done with high quality fabrics, batting, and tiny hand stitches - unless they are being judged under a machine quilted category.

I know next to nothing about quilting, so this may be a stupid question (quilters, please don't be insulted by my ignorance!). Are hand-quilted quilts "better" than machine-quilted just in terms of the skill demonstrated and the sentimental value of a completely hand-made piece, or are there other concrete advantages of hand-quilting over machine-quilting? I guess I had always kind of assumed that the main craftwork in the quilt was in the design, piecing together, and choosing the pattern for the stitching, rather than in the stitching process itself. Yet it sounds like this is a very important factor in judging competitive quilts, to the point that people are hired just to do the hand-quilting. Can someone more knowledgeable enlighten me, please?

It's more a difference in media - much like you'd see in a cooking contest - pies are usually judged separately from cookies or home canned jellies. 

The use of a machine allows more standard stitching size, so the skill & control of the needle to get tiny stitches that don't hang up on a broken nail & pulled out of place isn't considered with the same "weight".    Embroidery is also much faster on a machine than by hand - so the amount of time involved may be somewhat different.

The last show I worked (2012?) there was a quilt that had lace embroidered onto various pieces rather than sewn to the quilt - it was part of the quilt and design in a different way than lace sewn to it would have been...and the quilter wandered around with a couple of scraps from the quilt showing how she'd embroidered the lace onto the quilt....it was amazing...

There are also different categories due to age and experience as a quilter - so it's not just all one category of "quilt"...

There are whole cloth Hawaiian quilts (think of taking a large piece of fabric and doing the kind of cutting that was done in grade school to get one giant fabric snowflake - only with much more intricate designs and then appliqueing that by hand to a piece of fabric large enough to cover the entire bed; patchwork quilts; applique quilts done with a lot of smaller designs instead of one huge design; and quilts made with wool or silk & velvet (crazy quilts) in various distinctive styles.

It's as complicated a craft as someone wants to make it....

Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I explain?

SheltieMom

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #973 on: August 05, 2014, 06:38:57 PM »
I'm working on a queen-sized quilt right now for my son and DIL. I pieced it (sewed the pieces together) on a machine, and I'm hand-quilting it. Piecing it took several weeks, I'm hoping to finish the quilting in about 18 months. The last one I did for my older son took 4 years. (Of course, I fostered 17 babies in that 4 years, so it wasn't a high priority.) One thing that is helping tremendously is a quilting frame that holds it in place, so I can sit down and quilt whenever I have a few minutes, rather than getting it out every time, and using a hand held hoop.
This is the first time I've done a combination of pieced blocks and plain blocks with a pattern quilted in, and I'm really excited about it. It's much faster than quilting every piece of every block. That's called stitch-in-the-ditch, and means stitching both sides of every seam.
You could not pay me enough to make one to sell. It's strictly a labor of love.
If Timmy had had a Sheltie, he never would have fallen in that well!

PastryGoddess

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #974 on: August 05, 2014, 07:21:19 PM »



Hand quilting is sewing everything by hand, not using a machine at all

Machine quilting uses a sewing/quilting machine for a majority or all of the stitching. Sewing/quilting machines can be manual or automatic, but it's still machine quilting

I've never seen the terms defined in this way. Piecing is the sewing together of pieces of fabric to make the quilt top. Quilting is sewing together the three layers of the quilt top, batting and backing fabric.
Both processes, piecing and quilting, can be done either by hand or by machine.
You can find quilts that were hand pieced and machine quilted, machine pieced and hand quilted, or quilts where both processes were done by the same method.
the person I responded to had specific questions about the quilting portion, not piecing.   They wondered whether hand quilting could be done using a machine. All of the long responses were confusing to them so I answered short and sweet.