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First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!

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MommyPenguin:
My husband and I got a bread machine for our wedding, uh, 9 years ago.  Today, I actually tried using it.  :(  Yes, we've been carting it around for 9 years without having used it once.  We loved the idea, just never got around to it.  So, we'd really like to try making bread at home instead of buying it at the grocery store.  I found a great recipe that I wanted to try.

It turned out to taste really good, but there was a slight issue.  It overflowed the little "bucket" part.  I'm not just talking about it having a bit of a muffin-top, which I think is normal, but it filled the entire top of the bread machine such that it was pressed up against the little window on the top.  When it finished, I had to turn the bread machine on its side and sort of dig the bread out.  When it came out, I discovered that the whole "muffin top" section (i.e. the overflow stuff) didn't really cook and was still doughy, so I cut that part off and baked it a bit in the oven.  The rest of the bread turned out perfectly baked and was absolutely delicious!  My kids are thrilled at the idea of having this as their regular bread every day.  Just wait 'til I start replacing more and more of the bread flour with whole wheat...

Anyway, I'm wondering if anybody can tell what I did wrong to cause so much overflow?  This is the recipe I used: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/honey-of-an-oatmeal-bread/  It makes a one-pound loaf.  I have a two-pound loaf machine, so I doubled the recipe exactly.  Was I not supposed to double the yeast when I doubled the recipe?  Or is my machine just not actually able to handle that amount, and I should try making the recipe without doubling and see how that does?  The only change I made to the recipe was to replace one of the cups of bread flour with whole wheat flour (so, when doubled, it was 4 2/3 cups bread flour, and I used 3 2/3 bread flour and 1 cup whole wheat).  I had *planned* to gradually start replacing more of the bread flour with whole wheat to find a good mix.

Any ideas?  I'm not sure if I should try not doubling the recipe next time, or doubling it but not doubling the yeast.  I feel like the bread was heavy enough already, if I double the recipe but *don't* double the yeast, won't it be even heavier?  So I guess I'm inclined to try just doing the recipe without doubling and see what happens.  But I'd love any pointers that you veteran bread machine users might have!

Outdoor Girl:
I make bread, but not in a machine.  My brother uses his a lot, though.

What I would try first is using 1.5 times the recipe and see how that works.  It may be that your yeast was really fresh and just rose more.  Double check that it was the right kind of yeast - did you use active dry yeast (traditional) or quick rise yeast or bread machine yeast, etc.

If you double the rest of the ingredients, you should definitely increase the yeast.  If the 1.5 times the recipe doesn't work, try doubling everything else but only use 1.5 times the yeast.

PastryGoddess:

--- Quote from: Outdoor Girl on June 26, 2013, 10:06:25 PM ---I make bread, but not in a machine.  My brother uses his a lot, though.

What I would try first is using 1.5 times the recipe and see how that works.  It may be that your yeast was really fresh and just rose more.  Double check that it was the right kind of yeast - did you use active dry yeast (traditional) or quick rise yeast or bread machine yeast, etc.

If you double the rest of the ingredients, you should definitely increase the yeast.  If the 1.5 times the recipe doesn't work, try doubling everything else but only use 1.5 times the yeast.

--- End quote ---

POD Outdoor Girl.  Try doing a 1.5x batch.  If that doesn't work then do a 1x batch and see how full the machine gets.

Do you have a kitchenaid/stand mixer?  If so I highly recommend making bread from scratch.

MommyPenguin:
Out of curiosity, what's the advantage of doing the bread from scratch?  I do have a Kitchenaid, but while it technically has a dough hook, my husband has asked me firmly *not* to ever attempt to use it to knead bread, because of the amount of wear it puts on the machine.  I was hoping that with the bread machine, I could just measure and dump in the ingredients, then go do other stuff (I homeschool and I have four children, so doing a lot of kneading and such every day wouldn't be likely to happen).  I even thought about maybe making some pre-measured bags of the dry ingredients that I could just dump in every day and then add the wet ingredients on top.  Hmm, I guess that wouldn't work with the yeast needing to be refrigerated now that it's open.

The yeast is actually very fresh, as I just bought it last night!  It's one of those little jars of Fleischmann's and it's actually "bread machine" yeast.  I thought that would be a good thing.  I'm a little new at this, though!

I could definitely try to do 1.5 times the recipe, it just makes the math a little more complicated, especially when it comes to that 1/3 cup.  :)  But it does sound reasonable, so I guess I'll try it! 

veryfluffy:
Depending on what model of machine you have, my recommendation is to use it as a dough-maker, not as a bread-maker. I've had a bread machine for about 5 years, and use it about three times a week -- after the first three or four loaves, I stopped using it to bake the bread and have only used the "dough" programme. Chuck in the ingredients, turn it on, then 90 minutes later your dough is perfectly ready to form into whatever shape you like -- then you wait for the rise, and bake in the oven. You can find recipes for everything adapted for the bread machine dough programme: bagels, ciabatta, cinnamon buns, challah, etc.

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