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First bread machine use - uh-oh, overflow!

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blarg314:

As far as I understand it, bread machine yeast is more finely textured than active dry yeast, and faster rising. That's not a problem, as long as your recipe calls for that type of yeast - it looks like the recipe you use calls for active dry yeast, which rises more slowly.

Other things that might affect it are ambient temperature and humidity. I find that in the summer I need less yeast compared to the winter, due to the 20C difference in room temperature.

Flour gluten content varies from country to country, which may require some adjustments. 

The thing with bread machines is that you need a good recipe, and you need to follow it carefully, as you can't adjust as you go along the way you do when you're making it by hand (add a little flour, let it rise a little longer, etc).

You can do mixes - mix up all the dry ingredients except the yeast.  My bread machine calls for liquid on the bottom, then the dry ingredients, then you put the yeast in a little hollow in the dry ingredients at the top.

PastryGoddess:

--- Quote from: MommyPenguin on June 26, 2013, 10:32:49 PM ---Out of curiosity, what's the advantage of doing the bread from scratch?  I do have a Kitchenaid, but while it technically has a dough hook, my husband has asked me firmly *not* to ever attempt to use it to knead bread, because of the amount of wear it puts on the machine.  I was hoping that with the bread machine, I could just measure and dump in the ingredients, then go do other stuff (I homeschool and I have four children, so doing a lot of kneading and such every day wouldn't be likely to happen).  I even thought about maybe making some pre-measured bags of the dry ingredients that I could just dump in every day and then add the wet ingredients on top.  Hmm, I guess that wouldn't work with the yeast needing to be refrigerated now that it's open.

The yeast is actually very fresh, as I just bought it last night!  It's one of those little jars of Fleischmann's and it's actually "bread machine" yeast.  I thought that would be a good thing.  I'm a little new at this, though!

I could definitely try to do 1.5 times the recipe, it just makes the math a little more complicated, especially when it comes to that 1/3 cup.  :)  But it does sound reasonable, so I guess I'll try it! 

--- End quote ---

I turn my bread measurements into metric, it's much easier measuring in whole numbers. I have a $8 kitchen scale that goes between pounds and grams.  being a little off won't hurt your dough, it's pretty tough and it can't fight back

I'm biased, but when you make the dough from scratch, I think that is rises higher and has a more developed flavor than from a bread machine.  You can also play with braiding and other stacking techniques.

Bread is not something that you need to watch all the time.  My timeline is the following
Depending on the dough, I'll mix it for 7-10 min.  Then I form into a ball and put into a greased bowl with a towel or plastic over top.  I walk away and leave it alone for a few hours.  I come back.  Give it quick knead and form it back into a ball and back in the bowl it goes for another hour or so.  At this point, if you don't have time to finish shaping your loaves you can wrap it in plastic and throw it in the fridge to ******* the yeast.  If it will be a couple of days before you can get to it, then throw it in the freezer

I do my final shaping/braiding or put it in the pan, give it an egg wash, let it proof for 20-30 min and then into the oven it goes

Outdoor Girl:
The bread machine yeast would likely rise more than traditional yeast.  You could try a double batch, cutting the yeast down to 1.5 times the recipe and see if that works.  But if you can figure out the measurements for 1.5 times the recipe and still use 1.5 times the yeast, it should be lighter.  (You said it seemed like a dense, heavy bread.)

And a tip for the measuring:  if it calls for 1/3 cup, go ahead and use your 1/3 cup measure, measuring out 1 full portion and then guestimating 1/2 a portion in the same measuring cup.  Or you convert everything to the same common denominator, if you can do fractions.  1/2 of 1/3 would be 1/6 and 1/3 would be 2/6 so adding them together gives you 3/6 or 1/2.  You could even use a calculator and just round everything to the nearest measure.  1 divided by 3 times 1.5 equals 0.5

Specky:
I have found that a 1.5x the recipe for a 1 lb loaf does quite nicely in my 2lb bread machine. 

Last night, I got brave and programmed a sourdough course into the machine.  This morning, I have an honest-to-Betsy real sourdough loaf (no yeast, just the sourdough starter to leaven) waiting for us.

Miss Unleaded:

--- Quote from: Specky on June 27, 2013, 09:44:28 AM ---I have found that a 1.5x the recipe for a 1 lb loaf does quite nicely in my 2lb bread machine. 

Last night, I got brave and programmed a sourdough course into the machine.  This morning, I have an honest-to-Betsy real sourdough loaf (no yeast, just the sourdough starter to leaven) waiting for us.

--- End quote ---
Does it taste good?  I have never had any luck getting sourdough to work in a real bread machine.  It never cooks right.

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