Author Topic: The Dentist No Show  (Read 5966 times)

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mich3554

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Re: The Dentist No Show
« Reply #45 on: July 03, 2013, 08:22:11 PM »
This raises a huge red flag for me.  It could indicate a newly graduated dentist or an office in financial trouble.  Look into the dentist's background before you go back.  Beware of a brand new dental practice for anything major.

I disagree.

I have a friend who is a periodontist and is married to my best friend.  When he graduated and opened his new practice (and he graduated from one of the top residency programs in the nation), he could not find a receptionist come hell or high water.  So he had his wife (my friend) step in and help him out.  He preferred to work early hours because he knew that this was when a lot of people like to come in, in order to be able to get to work on time.  I think his first appointment is at 7.  However, my friend has to wait until she gets her child off to school before she can come in, so he sees his first patients before my friend gets in around 8:30ish.

They still work his office this way and he's got a waiting list for people to get in as long as my arm.  I would not hesitate to go there myself either, as I know he does spectacular work.

I would choose ANYONE newly minted out of a good residency program vs a well established dentist who does not have newer skills.  Unfortunately, some older dentists give infection control a short shift because once upon a time, it was not uncommon to practice without gloves, without personal protection, etc.

I've worked in dental schools waaaay too long at this point!

daen

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Re: The Dentist No Show
« Reply #46 on: July 04, 2013, 10:39:22 AM »
In reference to arrival time vs start time:

Once upon a time, I worked in a fast food restaurant next to a bank. A number of the bank tellers were regulars. So when there was a new hire (NH), she began coming in as well, sometimes with the group, sometimes not.
She was friendly, so we chatted a bit.

Then NH stopped coming. An indiscreet co-worker (possibly a supervisor) told my boss it was because NH was let go, in part because she didn't realize that "start at 9" meant "be ready to serve your first customer at 9.00 am precisely" instead of "get to the counter at 9 and start checking your drawer."

I freely admit that I don't know if NH wasn't paid for the 5-10 minutes of setup each shift, or if this was spelled out to her before she accepted the job, but apparently NH's lateness was repeated after expectations had been clarified. Also, by NH's own admission, she had made a few mistakes in her work, the nature of said mistakes and her attitude toward them making me wonder if she was suited to banking. (She had mentioned to me in passing that she had made a thousand-dollar mistake in calculating an exchange rate - and she sounded amused, not remoresful, at her mistake.)

Yvaine

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Re: The Dentist No Show
« Reply #47 on: July 04, 2013, 11:20:40 AM »
In reference to arrival time vs start time:

Once upon a time, I worked in a fast food restaurant next to a bank. A number of the bank tellers were regulars. So when there was a new hire (NH), she began coming in as well, sometimes with the group, sometimes not.
She was friendly, so we chatted a bit.

Then NH stopped coming. An indiscreet co-worker (possibly a supervisor) told my boss it was because NH was let go, in part because she didn't realize that "start at 9" meant "be ready to serve your first customer at 9.00 am precisely" instead of "get to the counter at 9 and start checking your drawer."

I freely admit that I don't know if NH wasn't paid for the 5-10 minutes of setup each shift, or if this was spelled out to her before she accepted the job, but apparently NH's lateness was repeated after expectations had been clarified. Also, by NH's own admission, she had made a few mistakes in her work, the nature of said mistakes and her attitude toward them making me wonder if she was suited to banking. (She had mentioned to me in passing that she had made a thousand-dollar mistake in calculating an exchange rate - and she sounded amused, not remoresful, at her mistake.)

I really feel like in these cases, the employee should be scheduled for a shift of "8:45-whenever" instead of 9. Of course, one place I worked, they started doing that, and then one of the supervisors became convinced that it meant everyone should show up at 8:30!  ;D There was no business reason for people to be there at 8:30, that's just how entrenched the "on time is late" idea was in this person.

daen

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Re: The Dentist No Show
« Reply #48 on: July 04, 2013, 11:43:38 AM »
In reference to arrival time vs start time:

Once upon a time, I worked in a fast food restaurant next to a bank. A number of the bank tellers were regulars. So when there was a new hire (NH), she began coming in as well, sometimes with the group, sometimes not.
She was friendly, so we chatted a bit.

Then NH stopped coming. An indiscreet co-worker (possibly a supervisor) told my boss it was because NH was let go, in part because she didn't realize that "start at 9" meant "be ready to serve your first customer at 9.00 am precisely" instead of "get to the counter at 9 and start checking your drawer."

I freely admit that I don't know if NH wasn't paid for the 5-10 minutes of setup each shift, or if this was spelled out to her before she accepted the job, but apparently NH's lateness was repeated after expectations had been clarified. Also, by NH's own admission, she had made a few mistakes in her work, the nature of said mistakes and her attitude toward them making me wonder if she was suited to banking. (She had mentioned to me in passing that she had made a thousand-dollar mistake in calculating an exchange rate - and she sounded amused, not remoresful, at her mistake.)

I really feel like in these cases, the employee should be scheduled for a shift of "8:45-whenever" instead of 9. Of course, one place I worked, they started doing that, and then one of the supervisors became convinced that it meant everyone should show up at 8:30!  ;D There was no business reason for people to be there at 8:30, that's just how entrenched the "on time is late" idea was in this person.

I fully agree. If you're required to be at your station and ready to go at 9, and this requires a known amount of prep time, this should be included in your shift schedule and paid time. Equally, if you are required to perform a number of shutdown activities to end your shift, that should be included in your shift schedule and paid time.

At my current position, I get paid calculated on an eight-hour day, but my opening and closing duties require me to show up at least five minutes before opening and at least five minutes after. I put up with it because I knew that going in, and it's a term position that's almost over now. Besides, there's a certain amount of flexibility for extended breaks and taking time off, and a few other perks.

Redsoil

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Re: The Dentist No Show
« Reply #49 on: July 04, 2013, 12:26:25 PM »
A perspective from the other side.

At our clinic, first appointments are at 8.30am.  We will typically be there from 8am, and will take phone calls from then.  However, we often have discussions relating to confidential information and workload for the day at the reception desk prior to opening time (yes, it needs to be at the desk, where all the info is).  Thus, the doors don't open until 8.25am so we can be properly organised for the day.  It's obvious we're in the clinic, but we need this time prior to opening, uninterrupted by dealing with patients walking in.  Same goes for appointments after lunch break.  Again, ongoing discussions are held prior to afternoon session, so doors will not open until just before 2pm.

Previously, we didn't lock the doors, and would have patients simply come in early (some, up to 45 minutes early during our lunchbreak!) as they were "in town, and finished their other tasks".  When we mentioned that we were still on break, and attending to other tasks ("lunchbreak" not necessarily meaning we weren't actually working, just not available for patients coming in), the common reply was "Oh, that's okay, I don't mind waiting".  Not a good thing, as it threw our schedule out, and meant we couldn't discuss sensitive information.  Plus, at times we actually liked to get a "break" if possible!

So please realise that while it may be convenient for you to arrive quite early, there are other tasks the staff may need to do in private, without patients around.  We found that allowing patients in to wait in the above cases meant they wanted to "chat" (or worse, actually be seen extremely early) and we couldn't get anything else done.  We are a friendly clinic, so it's lovely our patients like to spend time with us, but lines do need to be drawn.
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Yvaine

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Re: The Dentist No Show
« Reply #50 on: July 04, 2013, 12:29:54 PM »
A perspective from the other side.

At our clinic, first appointments are at 8.30am.  We will typically be there from 8am, and will take phone calls from then.  However, we often have discussions relating to confidential information and workload for the day at the reception desk prior to opening time (yes, it needs to be at the desk, where all the info is).  Thus, the doors don't open until 8.25am so we can be properly organised for the day.  It's obvious we're in the clinic, but we need this time prior to opening, uninterrupted by dealing with patients walking in.  Same goes for appointments after lunch break.  Again, ongoing discussions are held prior to afternoon session, so doors will not open until just before 2pm.

Previously, we didn't lock the doors, and would have patients simply come in early (some, up to 45 minutes early during our lunchbreak!) as they were "in town, and finished their other tasks".  When we mentioned that we were still on break, and attending to other tasks ("lunchbreak" not necessarily meaning we weren't actually working, just not available for patients coming in), the common reply was "Oh, that's okay, I don't mind waiting".  Not a good thing, as it threw our schedule out, and meant we couldn't discuss sensitive information.  Plus, at times we actually liked to get a "break" if possible!

So please realise that while it may be convenient for you to arrive quite early, there are other tasks the staff may need to do in private, without patients around.  We found that allowing patients in to wait in the above cases meant they wanted to "chat" (or worse, actually be seen extremely early) and we couldn't get anything else done.  We are a friendly clinic, so it's lovely our patients like to spend time with us, but lines do need to be drawn.

And I think it's possible that the office where the receptionist was arriving at 8:55 was actually prepared to open, in just this same way. Maybe the rest of the office staff was already there, doing other business and ready to switch to seeing patients on the dot of nine, and the receptionist's job is to show up right before 9 and unlock the door.

Redsoil

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Re: The Dentist No Show
« Reply #51 on: July 04, 2013, 12:37:52 PM »
Oh, and for new patients, we allow 15 minute to complete paperwork before their appointment time.  This is stated in the intial contact, and also in the reminder call, saying "If you could arrive at 2.45, we'll have some forms to be filled in and then you'll be seen at 3pm."  Even saying that (I haven't figured a clearer way to say it), people would arrive at 2.25 or 2.30, saying "Oh, I thought I'd have to fill in paperwork, so I came early."  A few have then been antsy, thinking as they arrived early, they'd be seen early!  All I can do is reiterate what had been said previously, and that the time for their actual appointment is 3pm, so "you have plenty of time for the paperwork and to relax with a magazine".
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kitchcat

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Re: The Dentist No Show
« Reply #52 on: July 04, 2013, 12:53:14 PM »
Understandable or not, this kind of thing is a deal breaker for me.

A couple years ago I had oral surgery and scheduled a follow up visit with the doctor to check my stitches, healing, etc. She suggested the time slot, I agreed. I showed up, the office was locked, no lights on, etc. I called the numbers she gave me, no answer. I waited ten minutes, called again, nothing. I left and went to a store around the corner and who did I bump into there? The doctor! I told her how I was just at the office and she just laughed and said she forgot about the appointment. No apology.  She told me to open my mouth right there in the middle of the store so she could "take a quick look."  :o I was stunned and angry, but I did so anyway because I did need her to check. After that, I got a different doctor.
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