Author Topic: kids and swimming lessons  (Read 8002 times)

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kherbert05

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Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #15 on: July 08, 2013, 01:38:31 PM »
If this turns into a double post sorry, the other tab just disappeared.

When I was in school we had swimming in 5th grade. The district has a natatorium and the HS's all share it for there Diving and Swim teams. Granted I went to a "rich district"

The district I teach in is more rural and has lots of land with wildlife refuge/livestock/farming exemptions (reduces the taxes on our farm from several thousand a year to less than 100 a year). We also have several 100% title I schools (majority of kids below the poverty line). still there is a natatorium. All 4th graders take swimming. Opting out means you fail PE, unless it is for a medical reason. Life Skills kids take swimming separate from 4th grade (those students are mainstreamed for specials) - but they also take swimming every year k-5 at least .

I was curious. I couldn't find swimming in the TEKS except for 1 mention in Kinder about knowing never to swim alone. I did a search of all 21 districts in Harris (not including North Forest because it is being closed and merge with HISD) and 6 in Fort Bend (not including Kendleton because it was closed and merged with LCISD). Of the 26 Districts (Katy is in both counties) only 2 don't turn up something about swimming lessons/swim teaming teams. I think some type of program is common in most school districts in Texas. Though most of the districts I searched would be 4A, 5A, or super 5A districts (large populations) The two that didn't have some result for swimming have smaller populations.
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cwm

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Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #16 on: July 08, 2013, 02:10:24 PM »
I was in Girl Scouts and we learned swimming every year at summer camp.  Camp activities were often broken up by swim proficiency. So if I brought a good friend and wanted to do everything with her, but she couldn't swim and I could, our afternoons would be spent doing different things because she'd be in the beginning swim group and I'd be in the more advanced one.

As a kid my parents would always take us to the pool nearly every day in the summer. I never took official swim lessons, I just kind of knew how to swim because I was doing it all the time, and started out in the baby pool (I think maybe a foot deep at best, supervised at all times) and worked my way up from there. Our pool complex had the baby pool, the kiddie pool (three feet deep), the regular main pool, which started out shallow then went to a deeper end where you could dive. Separate pool for adults only (I think it was a hot tub type pool), a lap pool where half of the pool was sectioned off as lanes and half of it was open swim, and a separate pool with three diving boards. I had plenty of experience.

In high school we had a swimming pool in the gym. For basic gym classes there was a section on swimming, and you had to pass it. We had one girl in our class who had severe disabilities, both mental and physical. She was in the pool with us every day, but had a special para with her in the shallow end to make sure she participated.

We also each had to take a second gym course, but there was only one that didn't involve swimming. I took it instead of wearing the school's swim suits and using the school's towels for another day. Even the members of the swim team hated the swimming lessons in school because of that policy. Yes, they were cleaned between uses, but still...

Hmmmmm

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Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #17 on: July 08, 2013, 02:48:50 PM »
If this turns into a double post sorry, the other tab just disappeared.

When I was in school we had swimming in 5th grade. The district has a natatorium and the HS's all share it for there Diving and Swim teams. Granted I went to a "rich district"

The district I teach in is more rural and has lots of land with wildlife refuge/livestock/farming exemptions (reduces the taxes on our farm from several thousand a year to less than 100 a year). We also have several 100% title I schools (majority of kids below the poverty line). still there is a natatorium. All 4th graders take swimming. Opting out means you fail PE, unless it is for a medical reason. Life Skills kids take swimming separate from 4th grade (those students are mainstreamed for specials) - but they also take swimming every year k-5 at least .

I was curious. I couldn't find swimming in the TEKS except for 1 mention in Kinder about knowing never to swim alone. I did a search of all 21 districts in Harris (not including North Forest because it is being closed and merge with HISD) and 6 in Fort Bend (not including Kendleton because it was closed and merged with LCISD). Of the 26 Districts (Katy is in both counties) only 2 don't turn up something about swimming lessons/swim teaming teams. I think some type of program is common in most school districts in Texas. Though most of the districts I searched would be 4A, 5A, or super 5A districts (large populations) The two that didn't have some result for swimming have smaller populations.

KHerbert, my kids went through SBISD and I don't think any of the SBISD schools offer swimming outside of HS. It's a shame it's not still offered like it was when you went through school.

HorseFreak

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Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #18 on: July 08, 2013, 06:39:01 PM »
I'm from the Northeast US and there it was common for the high schools to have pools and a swim team. If your school had a pool you usually had compulsory swimming as part of gym class, though in mine they didn't teach you anything useful except how to be embarrassed in from of your entire class.

Swim lessons were the norm when I was growing up in the 80's, but it was a private class you signed up for, not through school. I took one swim class when I was three (after my baby class). I had never met someone who was deaf before and misunderstood his instructions and sucked in water when I was supposed to be blowing bubbles out. I freaked out, ran screaming from the pool terrified the instructor was going to kill me. The poor guy was trying to encourage me to come back, but I was out of my mind. I refused to take another lesson after that even though my brother did. I'm a terrible swimmer, but it's not really an issue. 

Thipu1

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Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #19 on: July 08, 2013, 07:00:50 PM »
I never attended a school that had a pool so there were no formal swimming lessons.

I and most of my friends were taught to swim by family members on visits to the river or nearby lakes. 

During summer vacation, the local school district sponsored a free day camp.  Most afternoons, the camp met at the Recreation Park ( known, for good reasons, as the Wreck). This included a freezing cold pond that was a run-off from a reservoir.  Camp counselors would give informal swimming lessons but no grades were assigned and no certificates of proficiency were awarded. 

This was in the lower Hudson Valley during the 1950s. 

Somehow, we all learned to be fairly good swilmmers.   I never knew of a local kid drowning. 

 

CakeBeret

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Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #20 on: July 08, 2013, 07:20:08 PM »
I'm in the Midwest US.

There is one public school locally that has a pool. It is so hideously expensive to upkeep that they have public hours and charge admission, as well as renting it out for parties. I don't think any of the local universities have pools either; I know mine didn't. A few people have inflatable backyard pools (the kind that are about 3 feet deep) but it's pretty rare to see inground pools.

Swimming is never mandatory and swim lessons can get expensive. It is 100% possible for an individual to graduate college not knowing how to swim.

For our family, we believe that knowing how to swim and being comfortable in water is an important life skill. DS has been in swim lessons every summer since he was about 16 months old.

For my entire life, the only pool in my city was the public school pool, which has very limited hours. As a child I took swim lessons from a woman who had a pool at her house. About three years ago my city build a water park, and that's where my DS takes lessons now.
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Nikko-chan

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Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #21 on: July 08, 2013, 07:25:29 PM »
I took two sets of swimming lessons. One set in fourth grade, and one set the summer after, I think. I still don't know how to swim.

MommyPenguin

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Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #22 on: July 08, 2013, 07:47:17 PM »
My school did something called "drown-proofing," which was taking all the kids to an outdoor swimming pool in November in Maryland (so it was really, really freaking cold), teaching us the basics of treading water, then requiring us to each tread water for 2 solid minutes before we were allowed out of the pool.  I'm not sure I've ever been so cold in my life... it must have been about 50 degrees outside at most.  Now when I look back I'm not really sure why it was allowed... surely there was a danger of hypothermia?  But we did survive, at least.  None of the schools I went to had a swimming pool, so we had to go somewhere (I don't remember where) for it.

I did take swimming lessons outside of school, but they weren't required and weren't related to school in any way.  I remember you started as a "minnow" and ended up as a "shark."  Maybe it was the YMCA, not sure.  I know I got to shark level but I remember asking my mom if I could stop, because you had to breathe out underwater and weren't allowed to hold your nose and I found that very difficult.  Funny, she said something the other day about how she'd never had us take swimming lessons and regretted it, and I was like... huh?  But... we did take lessons!  No idea where that came from.

Jones

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Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #23 on: July 08, 2013, 08:20:57 PM »
Western US.

Swimming lessons are up to the parents. None of the schools here have a pool, not even the university. There is one community pool currently in use, two others that have been closed down in the last 10 years. The official swimming classes don't take anyone under the age of 3, and those are "pre-classes" involving getting to know water. Real swim learning doesn't start until age 5 or completion of all pre-levels at age 4. My DD is 7 and I wanted to start her in swimming last year but she wanted gymnastics/tumbling instead, as I'm not made of money that's what she got. I've been working on teaching her the basics myself but she's not a natural, if you know what I mean. She likes to play at the pool, but hates to get her face wet/blow bubbles, and seems to think that so long as she can propel herself in a lifejacket she doesn't need anything more.  Come to think of it, swimming lessons might be a waste of money, until she wants to learn.

Her brother, age 2, LOVES the water, has no problem getting his face wet and is extremely well acquainted with the toddler section of the pool. I have high hopes for DS's aquatics future.

Betelnut

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Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #24 on: July 08, 2013, 08:29:01 PM »
I grew up in a suburb of Dallas (U.S.) and our schools did NOT have pools so...no lessons associated with public education.  The town did have a public pool so I took lessons in the summer for a small fee.

I now live in Southern Maryland--I believe ALL the high schools have pools in my county.  I just came back from there as my daughter had a lesson tonight.  I don't know if lessons are offered through the public school system but lessons are offered though the County Parks and Rec and my daughter has taken many of them. 

Several of the high school pools are indoor so we can go swimming (for a small fee) year-round.
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Isometric

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Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #25 on: July 08, 2013, 08:37:42 PM »
Australia...

When I was at school ages 5-12 (it may be different now) there was no compulsory swimming lesson, although our school did have an outdoor pool- it was more for leisure activities in the Summer.

I had paid swimming lessons until age 12 or so. But I don't remember ever not being able to swim, so our parents much have introduced us to the water fairly early on. I'm not aware of anyone (family, friends etc) who doesn't know at least the basics. If I have kids they will have lessons as early as possible.

I think it's more just an environment thing - much of the population (within the capital cities anyway) lives within an hour or so of a beach, so it's common sense to teach water safety. Whereas in some parts of the world the danger might be snowy conditions or skating on frozen lakes etc.

Slartibartfast

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Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #26 on: July 08, 2013, 08:47:38 PM »
I think it's more just an environment thing - much of the population (within the capital cities anyway) lives within an hour or so of a beach, so it's common sense to teach water safety. Whereas in some parts of the world the danger might be snowy conditions or skating on frozen lakes etc.

Good point - we did have a cross-country-skiing unit in gym class in 6th grade, and I learned all the sports that can be played indoors all winter (i.e. October through March).

Katana_Geldar

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Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #27 on: July 08, 2013, 08:50:54 PM »
And so many people have backyard pools here.

katycoo

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Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #28 on: July 08, 2013, 09:01:39 PM »
A bunch of past topics made me wonder how the country/region/city or even parents of the posters here had treated swimming lessons for school aged kids.
We often hear posters say that no kid in Australia can grow up without having swimming lessons, but is it school mandatory or just the parents?
What about those that don't learn in the rest of the world, lack of infrastructure?
I had never heard of schools (middle/high or college) having their own pool until coming across an American TV show for example.

Australia has so much beach, that its just really common for poeple to learn to swim.  I'm not sure that its so commonplace out in the Country, but its so hot in summer as well, there's still pools and watering holes out there people would swim in.

Only private primary and high schools have their own pools.  I imagine most universities do though.

In  my experience, in Aus and NZ, swimming lessons are a standard part of primary school (ages 6-12).   You can opt out, but it's fun and part of lesson time so most are happy to do it.   I guess it would be hard to grow up not learning.

Not in my experience.  It might have changed but all my lessons were outside of school.  Its possible it might have been an option for school sport but since the school would have to hire the pool i doubt it would be free to have your kids learn at school.

gollymolly2

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Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #29 on: July 08, 2013, 09:07:17 PM »
My kids started taking swimming lessons at about age 18 months, which seems to be pretty typical. In my experience (in California), most communities have pools, as do most high schools.  Sometimes the community pool doubles as the high school pool, or the high school pool doubles as the community pool, but there's always a pool.  In my area, swimming is part of the physical education curriculum in high school, so all kids end up swimming eventually.  It's rare that an elementary or middle school has it's own pool, but not unheard of.

Exact same experience, also from California.