Author Topic: kids and swimming lessons  (Read 7875 times)

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Bethczar

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Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #45 on: July 12, 2013, 04:36:08 PM »
I live in suburbia, Midwest, USA.

My high school had an indoor pool. I think all of the neighboring high schools did, too. The high schools all had swim teams. Swimming was a unit in high school gym classes which were mandatory for at least 2.5 years (I think). The community recreation group used the pool for swimming lessons for younger kids. These classes had a small fee for residents of our city. We did not have a community outdoor pool, but the neighboring communities did. There was also a YMCA a few suburbs away.

My parents paid for me and my sister to have swimming lessons when we were young. I hated them at the time, but I am so glad I had them.

Same for me, in Wisconsin. My middle school also had a pool, so we had lessons there, too. There were year-round swim lessons you could take, too. Sadly, even with all those lessons, I'm still a bad swimmer. I'd love to learn, but there's nowhere around for adults to take lessons. >:(

sunnygirl

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Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #46 on: July 15, 2013, 10:10:01 PM »
In the UK swimming is part of the National Curriculum, so by law it's compulsory. Most UK schools bus kids to the nearest public pool though; they don't have their own.

My school (in the 90s) had its own pool when I first started, but I think the roof collapsed or something. All through the rest of school we got a coach to the local pool.

Clarissa

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Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #47 on: July 18, 2013, 07:16:40 PM »
When I was at school, we had swimming lessons from the age of 8 till 12. Bussed to the local swimming pool. I'm in the U.K btw. These swimming lessons were quite expensive, and were not very good. I had private lessons, but I'm still not a confident swimmer. My children have the same as I did, but the lessons seem much better and the older 2 are confident in the water, my youngest 3 are getting there. The lessons my children have cost 2.50 each and that includes the coach there, and the insurance.
ETA I honestly thought that all school in the U.S had their own pool.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2013, 07:19:11 PM by Clarissa »

Brisvegasgal

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Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #48 on: August 01, 2013, 05:33:15 PM »
Another Aussie here. From reading the other posts from Aussies, whether a school has a pool must depend on where you live. Where I went to primary school lessons were compulsory & we walked to a local pool.  My boys also attend public school and they have compulsory swimming lessons during the hot months of the year. Their school has a pool as do 3 of the 4 local public primary schools.  A lot of public high schools have them too.

Maybe this is because I live in Queensland (the state with the pointy bit at the top) which has 2 seasons - pleasant & REALLY hot!  I've been told that the climate here is similar to Florida...I wonder if swimming pools are common there too?

IslandMama

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Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #49 on: August 02, 2013, 02:07:48 AM »
Australia has so much beach, that its just really common for poeple to learn to swim.  I'm not sure that its so commonplace out in the Country, but its so hot in summer as well, there's still pools and watering holes out there people would swim in.

Only private primary and high schools have their own pools.  I imagine most universities do though.

In  my experience, in Aus and NZ, swimming lessons are a standard part of primary school (ages 6-12).   You can opt out, but it's fun and part of lesson time so most are happy to do it.   I guess it would be hard to grow up not learning.

Not in my experience.  It might have changed but all my lessons were outside of school.  Its possible it might have been an option for school sport but since the school would have to hire the pool i doubt it would be free to have your kids learn at school.

I think it depends on where you are.  I'm another Queenslander - I'm Gold Coast, so its theme parks and beaches here - and my daughter is in 2nd grade at the local primary school and they have quite a nice pool and have had for many years.  They actually gave it a refurbishment two years ago.  The kids do swimming lessons in terms one and four (October to December and then Jan/Feb to April for those not in Australia) with one of our PE teachers, both of whom are qualified swim teachers.  Most of the schools around here have a pool, if not then they either use a local pool or go to one of the many community pools around.

I spent quite a few of my younger years in New Zealand and my school also had a pool and compulsory lessons.  They also hired a pool key to families who applied (and met the criteria) for the summer months so they could access the pool after school, on weekends and during the holidays.  We didn't apply for one as we had an inground pool at home but hiring a key was quite common and the fee (which was $25, from memory) went towards the pool upkeep.

jilly

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Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #50 on: August 02, 2013, 01:29:28 PM »
UK here we had school swimming lessons through primary and middle school, none of the schools had pools we had to walk / bus to a nearby pool. I also had lessons outside of school, I grew up a 5 min walk from the beach and once when I was a baby mum got a bit distracted with a book and had to come fish me out the water. I could swim (doggy paddle) before primary school, it was necessary.

WillyNilly

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Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #51 on: August 20, 2013, 12:11:03 AM »
NYC here.

NYC is a series of islands (well mostly, The Bronx is on the mainland of the US) and has plenty of its own beaches plus other nearby beaches in neighboring areas. I know of no NYC school - elementary, middle, or high, public or private - that has a pool. I'm sure a few do, as we have thousands of schools, but its pretty rare. I do think all the 4 year City University (CUNY) schools have pools (which I believe only open to staff and CUNY students), and there are public pools, also a decent number of apartment buildings and gyms have pools, plus a bunch of private pool clubs. But I think a LOT of NYers don't know how to swim and even more have no reasonable access to pools.

I can sorta swim. My parents put me in swim lessons as a kid at a local seminary college, but I was pretty terrified and the class really didn't teach me how to not be terrified, the instructors were just exasperated by the idea of fear of water. But I went to a bay beach (read: no big waves) often in the summer as a kid so I learned to do ok. I still won't put my face in the water though. But its pretty much a moot point as I have no access to a pool. I can't afford the Y (about $1k a year), I have no reasonable way to get to the local Parks Dept pool (its pretty ar from any public transit), and the local pool club is expensive and uninviting (something like $600 for the summer, no guests, no day passes, very cliquish, etc).

Katana_Geldar

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Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #52 on: August 23, 2013, 08:57:48 PM »
Why do people have a problem with putting their face in the water? I honestly don't get that.

Jones

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Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #53 on: August 23, 2013, 10:37:49 PM »
Why do people have a problem with putting their face in the water? I honestly don't get that.

It enters every orifice the second one's guard is let down and the salt or chlorine stings. Also childhood ear infections that never went diagnosed. I, personally, do OK if I am staying with my face in the water, holding my breath and swimming under; but the in-out movement gets me choking and coughing every.single.time I try to get a rhythm.

RingTailedLemur

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Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #54 on: August 24, 2013, 02:08:07 AM »
Why do people have a problem with putting their face in the water? I honestly don't get that.

It's terrifying - like drowning (for me).

dawbs

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Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #55 on: August 24, 2013, 08:12:26 PM »
Why do people have a problem with putting their face in the water? I honestly don't get that.
It's not like most fears are truly logical.
People are terrified to fly, regardless of the statistics of real risk.
People are scared of spiders, even when they're living in an are where spiders are generally not severely poisonous and they know it's not a brown recluse.

The act of putting one's face in water is imitating, to the very basic parts of the brain, the act of drowning.  The fact that someone's subconscious reacts to that with "holy *expletive*, stop that--now is the time to PANIC" seems a heckuva lot more logical than fear of public speaking, when you come down to it  ;).

dawnfire

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Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #56 on: August 25, 2013, 06:28:33 AM »
Why do people have a problem with putting their face in the water? I honestly don't get that.

for me it's a drowning thing. I nearly drowned twice by the time i was 12 and submersing my face brings that all back. It's the same reason why I can't stand being touched in the water. (people were helping me across the deep end and dropped me in the middle of the pool

Katana_Geldar

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Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #57 on: August 25, 2013, 06:43:30 PM »
I fell into a pool when I was about two years old, not old enough to remember but old enough to have many dreams of drowning. But I've known how to swim for so long it's hard to remember a time when I couldn't. If I get into a good rhythm, I can swim lap after lap up and down the pool.

(Can't swim now because of MC :(, can't eve take a bath)

Out of interest, would it be common in the US for a family to have a pool and at least one person who lives there (not an infant) that can't swim?

Jones

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Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #58 on: August 25, 2013, 06:57:02 PM »
Out of interest, would it be common in the US for a family to have a pool and at least one person who lives there (not an infant) that can't swim?
I don't know about common...I only know one family  with a real pool (not a small wading pool) and they only had one kid, and she knew how to swim. I do understand that in other communities there are laws regarding gates and locks to keep small children out of a pool area without supervision.

Ceallach

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Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #59 on: August 26, 2013, 06:21:39 AM »
Why do people have a problem with putting their face in the water? I honestly don't get that.
It's not like most fears are truly logical.
People are terrified to fly, regardless of the statistics of real risk.
People are scared of spiders, even when they're living in an are where spiders are generally not severely poisonous and they know it's not a brown recluse.

The act of putting one's face in water is imitating, to the very basic parts of the brain, the act of drowning.  The fact that someone's subconscious reacts to that with "holy *expletive*, stop that--now is the time to PANIC" seems a heckuva lot more logical than fear of public speaking, when you come down to it  ;).

This thread has been fascinating and eye opening for me, coming from the side where "everybody swims".    I'm actually considered a bit of a non-swimmer because I don't have great technique and don't do proper strokes very often, I prefer to flap about and do my own version of half-breaststroke half-freestyle!    ;D 

My 6 month old baby goes swimming 1-2 times per week (it's winter here so we have to drive to the indoor pool, in summer he will go much more often as the local pool is outdoors).     He gets dunked under the water, and can actually "swim" for a foot or so when he is dunked by somebody else and pushed towards me.   And he comes up smiling.    I'm not suggesting my kid is anything special (he's just normal special!) but just to demonstrate it's natural instincts.   Actually at the pool the other day one of the pool staff pointed out to me some 4-5 year olds who had only just started swimming, and that they were having to relearn the "underwater" instincts.  It was interesting as they were at the same stage as the babies.   So I guess everybody has to start somewhere, it's easier for the bubba's to learn as they have the instincts still from swimming around inside their mother for 9 months!  I guess if you spend years un-learning that, and learning that water is a way to drown, it would get increasingly harder to ever learn or have any desire to do so.

I have another question for the non-swimmers - does that mean you don't snorkle e.g. if you go to a beach you wouldn't put your face in the water to look at the fish?   
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