Author Topic: kids and swimming lessons  (Read 6129 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

suzieQ

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 577
Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #60 on: August 26, 2013, 06:39:03 AM »
Face in the water thing - I don't like getting water up my nose. I can do it, and know to blow out through my nose but prefer to keep my face dry. When I swim, my preferred stroke is the side stroke. Keeps my head out of the water :) I used that method to save my brother from drowning when we were kids.

My Mom can't swim. I spoke with a guy from Germany this summer and he was surprised to find out there are people in the U.S. (Southeast) that can't swim. He says he doesn't know anyone in Germany who doesn't swim - it's part of school. I was surprised to learn that.

Harriet Jones

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6411
  • Yes, we know who you are.
Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #61 on: August 26, 2013, 06:59:17 AM »

I have another question for the non-swimmers - does that mean you don't snorkle e.g. if you go to a beach you wouldn't put your face in the water to look at the fish?   

I'm sure there are beaches in the US where you can snorkel and actually see fish, but I couldn't tell you which ones.

RingTailedLemur

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2807
  • Rudeness is a small person's imitation of power.
Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #62 on: August 26, 2013, 07:37:43 AM »
I have another question for the non-swimmers - does that mean you don't snorkle e.g. if you go to a beach you wouldn't put your face in the water to look at the fish?   

I've never tried.  I'm too afraid of something slipping or going wrong, because I would drown.  If I had full breathing apparatus, instruction, and something to hang on to, I'd be glad to try going underwater somewhere clear.

I've only seen fish in the sea once, when I was on holiday in the Mediterranean.  I looked at them from the rocks on the shoreline.  I don't like the beach.
« Last Edit: August 26, 2013, 04:19:18 PM by RingTailedLemur »

blue2000

  • It is never too late to be what you might have been
  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6686
  • Two kitties - No waiting. And no sleeping either.
Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #63 on: August 26, 2013, 07:50:31 AM »

I have another question for the non-swimmers - does that mean you don't snorkle e.g. if you go to a beach you wouldn't put your face in the water to look at the fish?   

I don't like water as it is - if there were fish nibbling my toes, I'd be halfway up the beach before you could say boo. ;D
You are only young once. After that you have to think up some other excuse.

Sharnita

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 21246
Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #64 on: August 26, 2013, 08:08:06 AM »
I'm a swimmer but in Michigan our fish our fairly brown, gray or maybe silver. No coralso very few swimmers tend to snorkel very often. The times.I have been in the ocean the beaches have been crowded.

Sophia

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 11550
  • xi
Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #65 on: August 26, 2013, 10:44:39 AM »
I never had a problem with my face being in the water.  But in scuba diving class I had a SERIOUS problem with breathing under water.  The Thinking Brain knew that air would come into my mouth when I breathed in.  But the Instinctual Brain said, "NO NO NO NO, Water will come in!  Don't breathe while underwater."  That was when I realized why I'd never liked snorkels. 

I know many people with pools and it would extremely odd to have a family member not swim.  In fact, I would just assume that the non-swimmer was terrified of water. 

But on infants and swimming, in the U.S. the idea of infants swimming is a fringe idea.  General advise is to even hold off on a real bath for months.  My city has many "Waterbabies" classes, but 9-months is the minimum age.  I had never even heard of the idea until my baby was about that age. 

WillyNilly

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 7490
  • Mmmmm, food
    • The World as I Taste It
Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #66 on: August 26, 2013, 02:03:52 PM »
Why do people have a problem with putting their face in the water? I honestly don't get that.

It seems like an odd thing to be baffled by. I mean the only way to drown is via liquid in your face. So its pretty logical for people to not want to put themselves in a position where its now possible to drown. Especially when swimming - when exerting energy a person is likely to get out of breath or breath deeper or faster - and if they do that with their face in the water they will breathe in water... and possibly drown.

Out of interest, would it be common in the US for a family to have a pool and at least one person who lives there (not an infant) that can't swim?

I've only ever known one real person (not a celebrity for example) who had a pool big enough to swim in. Most regular people I know who have pools have ones that are no more then 8-10 feet across and no more then 5 feet deep. Personal home pools are more for relaxing/playing/cooling off in, swimming pools are big public things.

I have another question for the non-swimmers - does that mean you don't snorkle e.g. if you go to a beach you wouldn't put your face in the water to look at the fish?   

The water at northeast beaches, where I live, tends to be very dark (from the seaweed/other sealife) and the fish very grey. Also the waves are pretty rough and riptides are a concern. I don't think it would be much fun to snorkle. I did snorkle in Mexico once and I was mostly ok with that, but I never went more then 10-20 feet from being able to stand or from a dock to hold on to.
« Last Edit: August 26, 2013, 02:05:36 PM by WillyNilly »

Slartibartfast

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 11465
    • Nerdy Necklaces - my Etsy shop!
Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #67 on: August 26, 2013, 04:17:27 PM »
Yeah - you gotta remember that the US is really very big, and most people live at least several hours away from the nearest ocean.  Sure, there are freshwater lakes and rivers and such, but those usually aren't clear enough to snorkel in.  Add in the fact that the water in the northern US oceans is too darn cold to really swim in most of the time, and you end up with only a very small proportion of the US population who live within reasonable travel distance of somewhere you even could snorkel.  I suspect the number of people living in Hawaii, Florida, California, etc. (the warmer coastal states) who regularly enjoy surfing/snorkeling/other beach activities is pretty similar to what you'd find in other, similar areas in the world.  Plenty of people may go to the beach as a holiday trip, but that's more to splash around or sunbathe - snorkeling isn't usually something you learn how to do if you're only there once every few years.

Katana_Geldar

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1524
Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #68 on: August 26, 2013, 09:02:53 PM »
But on infants and swimming, in the U.S. the idea of infants swimming is a fringe idea.  General advise is to even hold off on a real bath for months.  My city has many "Waterbabies" classes, but 9-months is the minimum age.  I had never even heard of the idea until my baby was about that age.

CRIVINS!? Do they sponge bath babies then?

Every summer you see tourists going out into conditions too much for them, and some of them don't make it back home. Please, if you are visiting Australia and want to try our beaches (and you should, they're the best in the world, just don't go to Bondi ;)) please, at least learn how to duck under a wave and let it wash over you. Once I learned how to do that, I stopped being thrown about and haven't been "dumped" in years.

Slartibartfast

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 11465
    • Nerdy Necklaces - my Etsy shop!
Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #69 on: August 27, 2013, 12:43:37 AM »
But on infants and swimming, in the U.S. the idea of infants swimming is a fringe idea.  General advise is to even hold off on a real bath for months.  My city has many "Waterbabies" classes, but 9-months is the minimum age.  I had never even heard of the idea until my baby was about that age.

CRIVINS!? Do they sponge bath babies then?

Every summer you see tourists going out into conditions too much for them, and some of them don't make it back home. Please, if you are visiting Australia and want to try our beaches (and you should, they're the best in the world, just don't go to Bondi ;)) please, at least learn how to duck under a wave and let it wash over you. Once I learned how to do that, I stopped being thrown about and haven't been "dumped" in years.

Not sponge bath, but you get a baby bathtub (example) where you can pretty much just pour cupfuls of water over your baby and use a washcloth.  They don't have to be propped up and there's no danger of drowning.  When your child is old enough to sit up you can get an inflatable bath insert which goes in the big tub but helps a lot when they're at that "tips over when trying to sit up straight" stage and keeps them from sliding around in the bigger bath.

Ereine

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1094
Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #70 on: August 29, 2013, 11:33:54 AM »
I was never taught the technique of swimming and putting my face in the water, so for me it's part fear of drowning and part not knowing how to do it. I could benefit from swimming lessons but so far I haven't been motivated to do it. I tried swimming a few weeks ago when water jogging wasn't possible (water joggers share space with divers and general playing in the water and sometimes it can be a bit chaotic) and it was as unpleasant as I remembered. I can sort of swim (I don't know what it's actually called but we used to call it frog swimming) 50 meters but I have trouble breathing even keeping my head above water, it's like my lungs don't function in water so I water to take breaks to breath.

As for snorkeling, our fish tend to be quite brown too and they don't tend to hang around public beaches. I live by a sea and in theory it might be interesting to see what it looks like underwater (I've seen some nice photos) but as it's one of the most polluted seas in the world (and the beaches are by a busy shipping route) I don't have much desire to even swim in it.

Baby swimming starts at 3 months and 5 kgs here, according to the Internet.

Thipu1

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6325
Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #71 on: September 04, 2013, 10:45:35 AM »

I have another question for the non-swimmers - does that mean you don't snorkle e.g. if you go to a beach you wouldn't put your face in the water to look at the fish?   

I'm sure there are beaches in the US where you can snorkel and actually see fish, but I couldn't tell you which ones.

I'm a decently strong swimmer but I dislike putting my face in the water. 

However, I have no problem snorkeling.  The mask covers your eyes and nose.  Only the lower part of your face is actually in the water and the snorkel makes breathing easy. 

There are certainly places in the USA where you can snorkel.  Hawaii, the Virgin Islands and Florida come readily to mind. 


RingTailedLemur

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2807
  • Rudeness is a small person's imitation of power.
Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #72 on: September 04, 2013, 10:50:39 AM »

I have another question for the non-swimmers - does that mean you don't snorkle e.g. if you go to a beach you wouldn't put your face in the water to look at the fish?   

I'm sure there are beaches in the US where you can snorkel and actually see fish, but I couldn't tell you which ones.

I'm a decently strong swimmer but I dislike putting my face in the water. 

However, I have no problem snorkeling.  The mask covers your eyes and nose.  Only the lower part of your face is actually in the water and the snorkel makes breathing easy. 

There are certainly places in the USA where you can snorkel.  Hawaii, the Virgin Islands and Florida come readily to mind.

Aren't there sharks there?!

Katana_Geldar

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1524
Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #73 on: September 08, 2013, 06:31:42 AM »
There are sharks practically everywhere, but they do stay aware from places where there are lots of people.

Leafy

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 174
Re: kids and swimming lessons
« Reply #74 on: September 13, 2013, 01:45:53 AM »
But on infants and swimming, in the U.S. the idea of infants swimming is a fringe idea.  General advise is to even hold off on a real bath for months.  My city has many "Waterbabies" classes, but 9-months is the minimum age.  I had never even heard of the idea until my baby was about that age.

CRIVINS!? Do they sponge bath babies then?

Every summer you see tourists going out into conditions too much for them, and some of them don't make it back home. Please, if you are visiting Australia and want to try our beaches (and you should, they're the best in the world, just don't go to Bondi ;)) please, at least learn how to duck under a wave and let it wash over you. Once I learned how to do that, I stopped being thrown about and haven't been "dumped" in years.

Not sponge bath, but you get a baby bathtub (example) where you can pretty much just pour cupfuls of water over your baby and use a washcloth.  They don't have to be propped up and there's no danger of drowning.  When your child is old enough to sit up you can get an inflatable bath insert which goes in the big tub but helps a lot when they're at that "tips over when trying to sit up straight" stage and keeps them from sliding around in the bigger bath.

Ah, I was wondering too. We also use baby baths but would still call that giving the baby a bath. Also, it's not strictly true to say that there is no risk of drowning in a baby bath. It gets drilled into us here that a child can drown in 2 cms of water (an inch), so it is parental presence and not bath or water depth that prevents drowning.

My 10 month old has been doing swimming lessons since 6 months of age. Prior to that we attended an post-natal aqua class run by a physic. Mum and bub in the pool for 15 mins and then 45 mins of aqua for mum. Our current swimming instructor tells us that she lived in the US when her daughter was a baby and she was not allowed to take her into the public swimming pool until she was ... now I'm forgetting, it may have been a year old. My DD went to the pool for the first time at about 7 weeks.