Author Topic: Paper, and papers, and professors... oh my!  (Read 3732 times)

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Sharnita

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Re: Paper, and papers, and professors... oh my!
« Reply #45 on: July 21, 2013, 05:32:10 PM »
As far as English classes in the US, I know there were at least 8 novels we studied in high school, although it was probably more like 10. We covered 4 of Shakepeare's plays, as well as various other plays, stories, poems, etc.

As I typed this I actually remembered 3 more novels I had forgotten. Each school varies a bit but I would say most high schools here do sound more intensive in the area oliterature.

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Paper, and papers, and professors... oh my!
« Reply #46 on: July 21, 2013, 06:54:10 PM »
Because of HECS/HELP, most universities in Australia rely on federal funding. This can limo that is offered in degrees. I went to a small regional university and after first year everyone in my majors (history and English) knew each other. We called the lecturers by the first names and they preferred it.

I really liked how they helped us and usually were willing for a chat. One unit a bunch of internal students were doing online, a lecturer told us if we got enough internal students together we'd get a tutorial in addition to the workshops with the lecturer.

PastryGoddess

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Re: Paper, and papers, and professors... oh my!
« Reply #47 on: July 21, 2013, 11:29:56 PM »
Because of HECS/HELP, most universities in Australia rely on federal funding. This can limo that is offered in degrees. I went to a small regional university and after first year everyone in my majors (history and English) knew each other. We called the lecturers by the first names and they preferred it.

I really liked how they helped us and usually were willing for a chat. One unit a bunch of internal students were doing online, a lecturer told us if we got enough internal students together we'd get a tutorial in addition to the workshops with the lecturer.

You're using acronyms that not everyone is familiar with
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Katana_Geldar

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Re: Paper, and papers, and professors... oh my!
« Reply #48 on: July 22, 2013, 12:28:56 AM »
HECS/HELP is the government lending you money for you to go to university, they pay the university for you to attend and you repay the loan through the taxation system.

HECS= Higher Education Contribution Scheme
HELP= Higher Education Loan Payments

cwm

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Re: Paper, and papers, and professors... oh my!
« Reply #49 on: July 23, 2013, 11:17:58 AM »
On the other subject of paper - why are so many different sizes used? If I'm notarising documents for Florida I find there may be three or four different sizes of paper in the bundle. Is there a specific reason for this? If my client is emailed the documents they just print onto A4 and that doesn't seem to cause an issue.

Well, that's because we have to be difficult.

You're probably coming across 8 1/2 X 11, which is the standard paper size here. Also, 8 1/2 X 14, which is legal size. There's bound to be a bit of variance with the 8 1/2 X 11, I've seen some slightly bigger or smaller than other sheets.

Another common size for legal documents, if you're copying paystubs or something else small is 8 1/2 X 5 1/2, which is just half of 8 1/2 X 11.

If you're interested, here's the reasoning behind it. Not that it makes much sense, but what does, really? Two links, with the same story, but the second one has a bit more information to it.

http://lawlibraryblog.seattleu.edu/2011/05/04/ambiguous-the-history-of-legal-sized-paper/

http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/627/how-did-8-1-2x11-and-8-1-2x14-become-the-standard-paper-sizes

Barney girl

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Re: Paper, and papers, and professors... oh my!
« Reply #50 on: July 24, 2013, 01:01:21 AM »
Thank you, that was interesting. I was going to say that we only use A4, apart from Counsel's notebooks, which are foolscap, but when I did a search to check the size I only found A4 notebooks. This leaves the mystery of where our facilities manager is sourcing the old size and why. One can't help feeling that "Tradition" may be the answer to the latter.

LTrew

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Re: Paper, and papers, and professors... oh my!
« Reply #51 on: August 26, 2013, 07:40:33 AM »
The biggest difference between the US and the UK in higher education is the in America you apply to and are accepted as a student by an institution, a college or university or whatever, and then choose what you will study and have quite a bit of control over your schedule.

In the UK you apply for a specific course at a university, and you study that course. If you decide you don't like it there is not a lot of flexibility, you would have to start completely over. (Some courses might have a little carry over if it was a similar subject, but you would have to apply as a new student and petition to have your experience considered.)

There are pros and cons to both systems. There is more flexibility in America, but the focus in the UK is fantastic if you are sure of what you want to study.

My degree in the UK was quite small and my tutors were very accommodating, they rearranged the schedule for my childcare needs and I had a really positive experience. There also seems to be a much wider range of qualifications and vocational training here than I was aware of growing up in America.

Snooks

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Re: Paper, and papers, and professors... oh my!
« Reply #52 on: August 26, 2013, 10:32:01 AM »
Having worked on the outskirts of the education system in the UK I came across the opinion that dealing with the US education system was a pain because there is no standardised testing for high school dipolmas.  In the UK you have A-Levels, the International Baccalaureate and the Pre-U (which has only been around a few years) but the University and College Application Service provides a way for these all to be compared across the board, that just doesn't exist in the US.  I believe there are high school exams which are taken in Australia around November time but I'm not sure if they're standard across the country like UK A-Levels are.

I agree that starting to drop subjects at 14 can be problematic but I whole-heartedly agree with the degree system the UK uses.  I think that after three years to be qualified to do a certain job or to have certain skills is a wonderful thing.  For the most part your degree isn't used in your job post graduation, I know a few people who work in communications, one has a degree in fine art, one in English literature, one in Geography and one has a masters in Engineering.  In some ways the UK degree system ties you less to a job because now employers are looking that you have a degree, not necessarily what it's in.

PastryGoddess

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Re: Paper, and papers, and professors... oh my!
« Reply #53 on: August 26, 2013, 12:24:17 PM »
That's what the standardized tests (SAT/ACT) are for.  The questions for the tests are the same throughout the country each year.  The more selective colleges not only have a minimum SAT score, but they also have a minimum Reading and Math score as well. 
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RingTailedLemur

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Re: Paper, and papers, and professors... oh my!
« Reply #54 on: August 26, 2013, 01:40:22 PM »
That's what the standardized tests (SAT/ACT) are for.  The questions for the tests are the same throughout the country each year.  The more selective colleges not only have a minimum SAT score, but they also have a minimum Reading and Math score as well.

But what do they test?  Do you have individual marks for sciences, geography, history, art etc etc?

PastryGoddess

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Re: Paper, and papers, and professors... oh my!
« Reply #55 on: August 26, 2013, 02:07:13 PM »
That's what the standardized tests (SAT/ACT) are for.  The questions for the tests are the same throughout the country each year.  The more selective colleges not only have a minimum SAT score, but they also have a minimum Reading and Math score as well.

But what do they test?  Do you have individual marks for sciences, geography, history, art etc etc?

The SAT tests reading, writing and math skills only.  each section is scored separately which are then added up to give a total SAT score.  Most colleges and university ask for a minimum combined SAT score. The more selective colleges not only require a minimum combined SAT score, but also have minimum reading, writing, and math scores.  You can score from 600-2400.  When I took the test it only went up to 1600. 

The ACT is a more comprehensive test.  It has 5 sections: Reading, Mathmatics, English, Writing, and Science.  You can get a combined score between 1 and 36.

There are also SAT Subject Tests which test in only one subject like math, writing, foreign languages, and history.  Those tests are used to test out of required core classes in college/university.  There are 20 of them.

Contrary to popular belief, most colleges accept both the SAT and the ACT equally. There is a chart which correlates the SAT and ACT scores. I took both tests.  I got a 1400 on the SAT and a 32 on the ACT.  Because my ACT score was worth a little more than my SAT score, I submitted those scores to the colleges I was interested in after culinary school.
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RingTailedLemur

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Re: Paper, and papers, and professors... oh my!
« Reply #56 on: August 26, 2013, 02:14:10 PM »
Thank you.

Sophia

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Re: Paper, and papers, and professors... oh my!
« Reply #57 on: August 26, 2013, 05:34:09 PM »
U.S. Colleges are drifting more toward requiring subject tests, particularly the more academically challenging ones.  AP, Advanced Placement, are subject tests that are supposed to be at a college level and if you get a high enough score you can skip the matching college class.  But, now universities seem to think that they are watered down.  They like to see them, and they like to see a high score, but many colleges don't give real credit for it. 
Some, Rice for example are requiring a certain number of SAT-II tests which are subject tests. 

PastryGoddess

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Re: Paper, and papers, and professors... oh my!
« Reply #58 on: August 26, 2013, 05:58:25 PM »
Yeah, when I was in high school (10+ years ago), my school district was one of the few in the state that offered AP courses in almost all of the high schools and had the most magnet schools as well (15 out of 25)  I remember my guidance counselors telling me that it would be very smart to take these classes along with the SAT subject tests to prepare for college.  Even students who were not in the magnet program or the AP program were encouraged to study for the SAT subject tests and there were special study courses offered.  Now however most of our state's school districts offer AP courses and specialized study courses for the SAT Subject tests.  My state often comes in #1 or #2 in the list of best states for education.  But then again we are a small state and so our ratios are a bit skewed
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Library Dragon

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Re: Paper, and papers, and professors... oh my!
« Reply #59 on: August 26, 2013, 06:38:19 PM »
Some high schools are beginning to phase out AP classes because students are preferring to take dual enrollment courses.  (College classes are taken and the students receive credit for both high school and college.)  MY DSs both graduated high school with about a semester of college under their belt. 

In DS1's instance the instructor from the local community college came to the high school.  The local Catholic high school takes their students to a local major university. 

The cost for us as parents equaled out for community college tuition vs. the costs involved with AP courses.  While DS1's ACT scores weren't amazing he received big scholarships from the all the schools where he applied (he actually had a scholarship offer from a school he didn't apply to).  He had a proven track record for doing A level college work. 

I on the other had arranged my entire undergraduate studies so I would never have to take the SAT or ACT because they scared me witless.  I did the Miller's Analogy Test for graduate school and did well enough I earned a smarty pants rep among other school librarians.  No, I never mentioned it unless specifically asked. 

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