General Etiquette > Life...in general

Take your time - more checkout lane discussion

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Cami:
I long ago learned as a consumer -- and was taught as a grocery store cashier -- to never leave the register until I make sure I have the correct change and my receipt and put them into my purse. As a cashier I was taught to never start a new customer until the prior one is satisfied that their money and receipt are correct and they are done with me, the reason being that if there is a problem it's far easier to correct if I haven't started a new order. As a consumer who once watched a guy come swooping down and grab a woman's wallet out of her hand as she was walking away from the cashier, not having put it in her purse yet, I learned not to move until my wallet is safe and secure.

So it doesn't bother me when people need more time. I really try not to let the little irritations of life get to me unless I need to raise my blood pressure. Just not worth it.

SiotehCat:
I don't like it. Not enough for it to bother me, but I won't tell them to take their time either.

I will keep going with my purchase, pay and then walk around them. Most of the time, I am only buying 2-3 things and paying with my card, so it doesn't take very long.

DottyG:

--- Quote from: veronaz on July 17, 2013, 11:56:12 AM ---The thread about changing lanes at the store made me think of another situation I’ve been in.

The person in front of me is taking a little more time actually exiting – putting change in their wallet, looking at receipt trying to understand something, etc.  Maybe it’s an elderly person and they will look at me apologetically or even say “Sorry” while nervously trying to get organized.

I always feel bad because I remember when my mom used to do this; she seemed to feel guilty that she was holding someone else up (even when she got older and had some physical challenges).

What I do is smile at the person and say “Take your time.  I’m not in that big of a hurry.”  Or “Don’t let people rush you; you’re fine.  Your money spends as good as mine does”.  Then they relax a bit.  I try to chill out, even if it happens in an express lane. 

Has this ever happened to you? 


--- End quote ---

I'm with you.  I think it falls into that "life with other people on our planet" thing.  And a smile and a nice word don't hurt a thing.  Might just make someone's day.  It's 30 seconds or so.  Surely I can slow down enough in my day to allow someone that without being irritated.

ladyknight1:
I slow down, I am never in a big hurry at the store or running errands, because I don't like having that kind of attitude about me. I prefer to do my shopping when I have the time.

Hmmmmm:

--- Quote from: DottyG on July 17, 2013, 03:29:59 PM ---
--- Quote from: veronaz on July 17, 2013, 11:56:12 AM ---The thread about changing lanes at the store made me think of another situation I’ve been in.

The person in front of me is taking a little more time actually exiting – putting change in their wallet, looking at receipt trying to understand something, etc.  Maybe it’s an elderly person and they will look at me apologetically or even say “Sorry” while nervously trying to get organized.

I always feel bad because I remember when my mom used to do this; she seemed to feel guilty that she was holding someone else up (even when she got older and had some physical challenges).

What I do is smile at the person and say “Take your time.  I’m not in that big of a hurry.”  Or “Don’t let people rush you; you’re fine.  Your money spends as good as mine does”.  Then they relax a bit.  I try to chill out, even if it happens in an express lane. 

Has this ever happened to you? 


--- End quote ---

I'm with you.  I think it falls into that "life with other people on our planet" thing.  And a smile and a nice word don't hurt a thing.  Might just make someone's day.  It's 30 seconds or so.  Surely I can slow down enough in my day to allow someone that without being irritated.

--- End quote ---

This. I usually respond with a "Don't rush".

One grocery store in my area does not allow their checkers to start with the next person's groceries until the one in front of them is gone. They feel starting with the next person implies they are rushing their customer out the door. I notice a higher than average number of senior citizens buying at this store. While I'm normally an impatient person, their policy does not bother me. I find it very polite.

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