Author Topic: Trash cans and their ettiquette  (Read 2495 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

RebeccainGA

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1207
  • formerly RebeccainAR
Trash cans and their ettiquette
« on: July 23, 2013, 01:26:46 PM »
I know, weird topic that came up in the breakroom today, and thought I'd get the e-Hellions in on it.

We have trashcans in our breakroom that have flat tops on them that hinge open in the center. If you drop something heavy enough in near the center, it opens and things fall in. They are set at a small angle, so there's a little 'well' of space at the top, where small items can sit without falling on the floor. Obviously, since the top is in contact with everything that falls through, and it is in the breakroom so the trash is often food related, the tops aren't the cleanest things in the room - and most folks would actively avoid touching them.

The problem happens when you have something lightweight - a napkin, an empty paper plate, etc. Is it rude to leave it sitting on top of the lid, so that the next person that drops something heavier in will 'clear' the lid? If you were to poke things in, then you'll end up washing your hands, drying them on a paper towel, and repeating the cycle again, so this isn't a good solution, but I was told by one of the bossier ladies on my team that it was "soooooo ruuuuuuude" to not poke a paper towel down into the can, even though she couldn't come up with a better solution.

Your thoughts?

SiotehCat

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3706
Re: Trash cans and their ettiquette
« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2013, 01:29:05 PM »
Why doesn't someone just clean the lid of the can?

Outdoor Girl

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 13765
Re: Trash cans and their ettiquette
« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2013, 01:37:56 PM »
I'd poke it down with something that was going to get washed anyway, like my fork or spoon that I take home and run through the dishwasher.  Or I'd wash my hands afterwards and take the paper towel with me to throw out in my desk garbage can.

I don't think it is horribly rude to leave it on the lid, as long as it won't stick to the lid.  At least it was in the can; better than the dough heads who think at the base of the can, on the outside, is close enough.  Seriously, dude, if you are going to make the effort to throw something in the garbage can, make sure it ends up IN the garbage can.  Drives me nuts, it does.
I have CDO.  It is like OCD but with the letters in alphabetical order, as they should be.
Ontario

CrazyDaffodilLady

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1251
Re: Trash cans and their ettiquette
« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2013, 01:45:03 PM »
I think it's icky to leave trash on top of the container.  I don't want to touch or deal with someone else's garbage.  It also makes the room look messy.

This goes double for the people that use paper toilet seat protectors and leave them on the toilet seat.  Yuck.
It takes two people to play tug of war. If you don't want to play, don't pick up the rope.

Yvaine

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 8855
Re: Trash cans and their ettiquette
« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2013, 01:49:34 PM »
I think it's icky to leave trash on top of the container.  I don't want to touch or deal with someone else's garbage.  It also makes the room look messy.

This goes double for the people that use paper toilet seat protectors and leave them on the toilet seat.  Yuck.

This.

In my experience, a lot of these trash cans, you can kind of push with the piece of trash you're throwing in, and if you get a little oomph behind it, you can get a brief window of time when it's swinging open and you can throw the trash the rest of the way in. Does that make sense? Some of them are too tightly hinged to do this, but a lot of them will swing open long enough. I don't really want to look at trash on top of the lid, especially if it has gunk on it.

cwm

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2427
Re: Trash cans and their ettiquette
« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2013, 01:54:07 PM »
I think it's icky to leave trash on top of the container.  I don't want to touch or deal with someone else's garbage.  It also makes the room look messy.

This goes double for the people that use paper toilet seat protectors and leave them on the toilet seat.  Yuck.

This.

In my experience, a lot of these trash cans, you can kind of push with the piece of trash you're throwing in, and if you get a little oomph behind it, you can get a brief window of time when it's swinging open and you can throw the trash the rest of the way in. Does that make sense? Some of them are too tightly hinged to do this, but a lot of them will swing open long enough. I don't really want to look at trash on top of the lid, especially if it has gunk on it.

POD. I've never seen any with hinges so tight you couldn't push the top down a bit with the paper towel or whatever and drop it in without actually touching the lid.

Besides, paper plates are usually stiff enough that if you fold it over a bit you can push the lid open and knock in any of your napkins and/or paper towels. Yes, they're lightweight, but they're also usually surprisingly sturdy.

Yvaine

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 8855
Re: Trash cans and their ettiquette
« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2013, 02:04:38 PM »
I think it's icky to leave trash on top of the container.  I don't want to touch or deal with someone else's garbage.  It also makes the room look messy.

This goes double for the people that use paper toilet seat protectors and leave them on the toilet seat.  Yuck.

This.

In my experience, a lot of these trash cans, you can kind of push with the piece of trash you're throwing in, and if you get a little oomph behind it, you can get a brief window of time when it's swinging open and you can throw the trash the rest of the way in. Does that make sense? Some of them are too tightly hinged to do this, but a lot of them will swing open long enough. I don't really want to look at trash on top of the lid, especially if it has gunk on it.

POD. I've never seen any with hinges so tight you couldn't push the top down a bit with the paper towel or whatever and drop it in without actually touching the lid.

Besides, paper plates are usually stiff enough that if you fold it over a bit you can push the lid open and knock in any of your napkins and/or paper towels. Yes, they're lightweight, but they're also usually surprisingly sturdy.

I think most of the tighter ones I've seen are on the feminine hygiene cans in restrooms, but those are at a pre-handwashing stage of the process anyway.

Or, OP, can you switch to one with a pedal and eliminate the whole argument?

siamesecat2965

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 8686
Re: Trash cans and their ettiquette
« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2013, 02:20:52 PM »
I think it's icky to leave trash on top of the container.  I don't want to touch or deal with someone else's garbage.  It also makes the room look messy.

This goes double for the people that use paper toilet seat protectors and leave them on the toilet seat.  Yuck.

We have the identical cans, i think, and this is what I try and do. I think its gross to leave something on top for someone else, with something heavier, to push in. I've never had any issue throwing a napkin or anthing light away and getting my hands dirty.

This.

In my experience, a lot of these trash cans, you can kind of push with the piece of trash you're throwing in, and if you get a little oomph behind it, you can get a brief window of time when it's swinging open and you can throw the trash the rest of the way in. Does that make sense? Some of them are too tightly hinged to do this, but a lot of them will swing open long enough. I don't really want to look at trash on top of the lid, especially if it has gunk on it.

RebeccainGA

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1207
  • formerly RebeccainAR
Re: Trash cans and their ettiquette
« Reply #8 on: July 23, 2013, 02:41:58 PM »
Or, OP, can you switch to one with a pedal and eliminate the whole argument?
In this case, I have no control, either of the cleaning or of the style of can - the building is mixed use, and the determination is made by the owners of the building.

MariaE

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4602
  • So many books, so little time
Re: Trash cans and their ettiquette
« Reply #9 on: July 23, 2013, 03:01:46 PM »
I agree with the "bossier lady" I think it's rude. Plus, as CrazyDaffodilLady mentioned, it looks messy.
« Last Edit: July 23, 2013, 04:01:54 PM by MariaE »
 
Dane by birth, Kiwi by choice

Hmmmmm

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6442
Re: Trash cans and their ettiquette
« Reply #10 on: July 23, 2013, 03:14:34 PM »
I agree with the "bossier lady"m I think it's rude. Plus, as CrazyDaffodilKady mentioned, it looks messy.

I agree with this. And if is so nasty that you don't want to use your paper towel to push open the lid, then someone needs to take the initiative to clean them. Because I really wouldn't want that near where I eat.

magicdomino

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4644
Re: Trash cans and their ettiquette
« Reply #11 on: July 23, 2013, 03:21:18 PM »
Just push the lid open and drop the paper in.  If the paper is going in first, your hands aren't going to touch anything very much.  Chances are, you will be washing your hands soon anyway, either to get the grease/chocolate/ketchup off your hands, or paying a visit to the restroom.

lowspark

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3965
Re: Trash cans and their ettiquette
« Reply #12 on: July 23, 2013, 03:23:04 PM »
I think it's icky to leave trash on top of the container.  I don't want to touch or deal with someone else's garbage.  It also makes the room look messy.

This goes double for the people that use paper toilet seat protectors and leave them on the toilet seat.  Yuck.

This.

In my experience, a lot of these trash cans, you can kind of push with the piece of trash you're throwing in, and if you get a little oomph behind it, you can get a brief window of time when it's swinging open and you can throw the trash the rest of the way in. Does that make sense? Some of them are too tightly hinged to do this, but a lot of them will swing open long enough. I don't really want to look at trash on top of the lid, especially if it has gunk on it.

POD. I've never seen any with hinges so tight you couldn't push the top down a bit with the paper towel or whatever and drop it in without actually touching the lid.

Besides, paper plates are usually stiff enough that if you fold it over a bit you can push the lid open and knock in any of your napkins and/or paper towels. Yes, they're lightweight, but they're also usually surprisingly sturdy.

I generally agree with all of this. I don't think it's the rudest thing ever and I probably would not make a comment if I saw someone leaving their trash on top, but I just think it's better to push it on through using the trash itself as a shield.

And yeah, I especially hate people that use paper toilet seat protectors and leave them on the toilet seat although I know that's not at all what you're asking about.

This is the kind of lid you're talking about, right?
http://trashcansunlimited.com/pro1415083.html

CrazyDaffodilLady

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1251
Re: Trash cans and their ettiquette
« Reply #13 on: July 23, 2013, 04:05:03 PM »
Expecting others to clean up one's garbage gives the impression, intended or not, that the non-disposer considers him/herself superior to others and thinks of other people as servants.
It takes two people to play tug of war. If you don't want to play, don't pick up the rope.

sweetonsno

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1392
Re: Trash cans and their ettiquette
« Reply #14 on: July 23, 2013, 04:05:31 PM »
I agree that it's rude to not ensure that your stuff makes it into the trash can. I see this sort of like throwing something and missing, then leaving it on the floor rather than picking it up. I think it's your trash and therefore your responsibility. It shouldn't be up to the next person who comes along to make sure that it makes it into the receptacle.