Author Topic: For British E-Hellions: How has London and the rest of England Changed...  (Read 2363 times)

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Venus193

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Do pubs still close at 11PM?

saki

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Do pubs still close at 11PM?

The licensing laws changed a few years ago to make it easier to open later but a lot of pubs do still close at 11pm.  Even where they close later, it's usually not that much later - midnight or so. 

In London, I'd say over half still close at 11pm but it varies - pubs in the City will often close early because their main trade is the post-work rush, pubs in busy residential areas are more likely to close later, etc.

scotcat60

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The pub at the bottom of my street applied to open until 1 am over Friday night into Saturday morning, and the same over Saturday night into Sunday morning. The local council canvassed the surrounding residents on whether or not they supported this. No one did, but it went ahead anyway. But after only a few months, the pub closed, was refitted, and reopened under new management, marketed as a "Family pub". Closing hours went back to no later than 11pm.

scotcat60

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Re: For British E-Hellions: How has London and the rest of England Changed...
« Reply #18 on: September 04, 2013, 09:14:58 AM »
The newest buidling, the Mobile Phone, also called the Walkie Talkie in London, has been causing problems. Apparently there is so much glass that it has been acting like a magnifying lens, and setting fire to carpets and furniture in shops opposite, and melting paintwork and wing mirrors on cars parked in the street. It seems the architect designed a similar building as a hote in Las Vegas, and guest were being scorched as they sat by the pool, and their sunloungers and newpapers were smouldering. However, he went ahead with the same design in London. Perhaps he thought that the sun doesn't shine in the UK?

cicero

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Re: For British E-Hellions: How has London and the rest of England Changed...
« Reply #19 on: September 07, 2013, 09:29:34 AM »

  In the 1980s we took several trips to northern Scotland on Britrail. When the train stopped for half an hour, it was our habit to hit the local M&S food hall to take back  a cold tandoori chicken and a
trio pack of salads.  Perhaps it's because we're now older, but the food doesn't taste quite as good.  We do wish NYC had 'Pret a Manger'.  The food, especially the porridge and the soups, is delicious.     

   

 

They do! http://www.pret.com/us/find_a_pret/

And I agree - though I prefer non-chains, this is one of the better ones ( really great when I was stuck at Heathrow for five hours!)

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sunnygirl

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Re: For British E-Hellions: How has London and the rest of England Changed...
« Reply #20 on: September 07, 2013, 11:01:40 AM »
I have an American friend who considers Pret her all-time favourite casual restaurant.
Pret actually cater my workplace so I'm afraid am heartily sick of their food (having eaten all their vegetarian options a million times).

English1

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Re: For British E-Hellions: How has London and the rest of England Changed...
« Reply #21 on: September 16, 2013, 11:01:02 AM »
Being in the south east, near London, for me the most noticable changes are:

Ethnic mix - 20 years ago most black people in the UK were of West Indian descent. Now there is a big proportion (larger in my perception) of African and African descent. Also many more East Europeans due to the change to immigration law/EU etc. Not saying either of these are bad things, it's just a change. Oh - and over here 'black' is the preferred term (in case any USA people are offended).,

High Streets - high street retail is visibly dying in many towns, with moves towards large retail parks and shopping centres (malls) way bigger than anything we had 20 years ago.

Wider choice of foods in supermarkets and availability of things that weren't even heard of  (likewise I suppose other things less available as they go out of fashion) for example I had sweet potatoes and plantains last week, but would not have found them in the past.

Building development - lots of new housing on types of land that would not have been built on before (lots going up on flood plains near me, will be a disaster at some point). Think that development is a bit more sympathetic to surrounding buildings nowadays, more emphasis on preserving historic centre atmospheres, you see some 1970s monstrosities squeezed in among centuries old buildings, for example, but now even contemporary designs need to fit well into their spaces and add something if it's an interesting area.

Work - unions much less powerful so some employees in less strong position than previously, but on the other hand other 'workers' rights' are improved, for example minimum wage, paternity rights and so on.