Author Topic: Vintage stories available for the iPad  (Read 1283 times)

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AmethystAnne

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Vintage stories available for the iPad
« on: July 28, 2013, 12:38:38 PM »
I've always had a fondness for the stories that my maternal grandparents would have read during their lifetime, particularly those that were published prior to the mid 1940's.

As a young girl, I would go into their attic and select a book from the bow-front secretary and sit and read. The 3 that I particularly remember are Emerson's Essays, the Bobbsey Twins, and Grace Livingston Hill.

Many years have gone by since then. I have borrowed and enjoyed many vintage books from the library. In April 2012, DH gave me an iPad. So. Much. Fun!!! Games, and Internet, and to be able to download books? And not be chained to a wall outlet? Dang! How much better can it get?  ;D

[I now have Emerson's Essays and lots of Grace Livingston Hill books on my iPad. No Bobbsey Twins, yet.]

I found an Internet site  http://www.gutenberg.org  that has an incredible(!) amount of vintage books available to be downloaded onto the iPad.

Through the iBooks app, I have found other vintage books. Right now, I am thoroughly enjoying a book called, "The Complete Works of Eleanor Hodgman Porter" She was the author who wrote the book that the movie "Pollyanna" was based on (the movies are a little different than the book. "Pollyanna Grows Up" is wonderful!)

Has anybody found 'old friends' via the Internet that they enjoyed pre-Internet?

siamesecat2965

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Re: Vintage stories available for the iPad
« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2013, 12:52:25 PM »
I've always had a fondness for the stories that my maternal grandparents would have read during their lifetime, particularly those that were published prior to the mid 1940's.

As a young girl, I would go into their attic and select a book from the bow-front secretary and sit and read. The 3 that I particularly remember are Emerson's Essays, the Bobbsey Twins, and Grace Livingston Hill.

Many years have gone by since then. I have borrowed and enjoyed many vintage books from the library. In April 2012, DH gave me an iPad. So. Much. Fun!!! Games, and Internet, and to be able to download books? And not be chained to a wall outlet? Dang! How much better can it get?  ;D

[I now have Emerson's Essays and lots of Grace Livingston Hill books on my iPad. No Bobbsey Twins, yet.]

I found an Internet site  http://www.gutenberg.org  that has an incredible(!) amount of vintage books available to be downloaded onto the iPad.

Through the iBooks app, I have found other vintage books. Right now, I am thoroughly enjoying a book called, "The Complete Works of Eleanor Hodgman Porter" She was the author who wrote the book that the movie "Pollyanna" was based on (the movies are a little different than the book. "Pollyanna Grows Up" is wonderful!)

Has anybody found 'old friends' via the Internet that they enjoyed pre-Internet?

Not so much via the Internet, but e-books, specifically, kindle. As a kid, I loved the Cherry Ames nursing series, and while they've been available for a while in Kindle format, they were 9.99 each, so I wasn't going to buy them. A few months back, they dropped in price to 2.99, and a couple of them, which said they were one volume, contained several!  I've also found and purchased some others I enjoyed reading as a kid/teenager.

PeterM

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Re: Vintage stories available for the iPad
« Reply #2 on: July 28, 2013, 12:56:25 PM »
Gutenberg.org is awesome. They were providing ebooks long before most people ever heard of the concept, let alone the word itself. And I'm amazed at what's in the public domain. I was under the impression that Sherlock Holmes, for example, was not in the PD because of various lawsuits by the Doyle estate. But if you go to Gutenberg, there it is.

It comes in handy at my job, too. I work at a library and am one of two people who handle all the help requests for the county's downloadable library books. We offer all the public domain classics, many of them straight from Gutenberg, but our system sometimes gets in the way. I had a woman yesterday who couldn't download Austen's Emma. I gave her a few things to try but told her she might as well just go to Gutenberg and download it to keep rather than have it disappear in three weeks.

Last week I helped an older gentleman who was absolutely delighted to see Gutenberg's wide variety of books. He found several memoirs of British officers serving in Asia during the 19th century. At most 50 people in the world had downloaded this stuff in the past, but he was extremely excited to be number 51. I showed him how to move the files to his Kindle and he was off to the races.

jaxsue

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Re: Vintage stories available for the iPad
« Reply #3 on: July 28, 2013, 01:04:01 PM »
I'm so glad I'm not the only person who's enjoyed vintage literature! I read modern stuff, too, but there's pleasure in old books (I own enough of them!).

Thanks for the link, OP.

Tea Drinker

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Re: Vintage stories available for the iPad
« Reply #4 on: July 28, 2013, 03:15:07 PM »
One delight of Project Gutenberg is the random stuff. A few months ago, I happened to look at the "recently added" page there, and saw "In Northern Mists," by Fridtjof Nansen. A several-hundred-page history of European exploration of the north, going back to classical times. And written before the first world war. Lots of detail, at least one place where I was thinking "I hope he lived long enough to see this one," and some things that more recent research has refuted. I would never have gone looking for this, but I'm glad I came across it.

The beauty of this is that, as with library books, the only investment is time: I can read a few pages and see whether I like something, or stop partway through, and not push on because I paid for the book. (Knowing about the sunk cost fallacy doesn't always help.)
Any advice that requires the use of a time machine may safely be ignored.

jayhawk

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Re: Vintage stories available for the iPad
« Reply #5 on: July 28, 2013, 10:21:23 PM »
Do they have The Boxcar Children?

MommyPenguin

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Re: Vintage stories available for the iPad
« Reply #6 on: July 28, 2013, 10:31:16 PM »
Thanks so much for mentioning this!  I just set my daughter up with the first Bobbsey Twins book.  She's thrilled.  Although she says it's not a mystery so far, and she's well into it.  I wonder if the series didn't start out to be mysteries or something.

I haven't checked for the Boxcar Children, but I do know that my library had the first 12 books (the ones actually written by Gertrude Warner) available as a single download.  So you could check your library to see if they have it, if the Gutenberg Project doesn't (I wouldn't think they'd be old enough, although I wouldn't have thought the Bobbsey Twins were, either).

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Vintage stories available for the iPad
« Reply #7 on: July 28, 2013, 10:43:21 PM »
A lot of classics are available free through iBooks, including all but a few of the Anne of Green Gables series.

Elfmama

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Re: Vintage stories available for the iPad
« Reply #8 on: July 28, 2013, 10:46:16 PM »
Yes, they have the Boxcar Children.

Much of the older stuff is enjoyable, but I recently re-read some of the things that I enjoyed as a kid and just cringe at it now.  Lots of casual racism that nobody (read that as "no book-buying pre-civil-rights-era white person") thought anything of at the time it was written.  And unfortunately, the early Bobbsey Twins books hit that mark exactly.  Comparing the ones that were from my mother's era with the ones written when I was a kid there are significant differences in the way the African-American servants were portrayed, particularly in their dialog.  "Dese chillun ain' nebbah gonna larn no mannahs ifn dey parents don't teach 'em diffrunt!" vs. "These children ain't ever going to learn manners if their parents don't teach them differently!"

Children's literature was often heavy-handed preaching.  Yes, Louisa May Alcott, I'm looking at you and your Old-Fashioned Girl

And I've found that a lot of free or low-cost ebooks on other sites are poorly OCRed, with no proofreading done.  Gutenberg does have the advantage of volunteer proofreaders, so you don't get to the last page of the murder mystery and have the detective announce "And the murderer is ... Efkdd9d!"
« Last Edit: July 28, 2013, 10:51:58 PM by Elfmama »
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EmmaJ.

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Re: Vintage stories available for the iPad
« Reply #9 on: July 29, 2013, 01:11:36 PM »
Yes, they have the Boxcar Children.

Much of the older stuff is enjoyable, but I recently re-read some of the things that I enjoyed as a kid and just cringe at it now.  Lots of casual racism that nobody (read that as "no book-buying pre-civil-rights-era white person") thought anything of at the time it was written.  And unfortunately, the early Bobbsey Twins books hit that mark exactly.  Comparing the ones that were from my mother's era with the ones written when I was a kid there are significant differences in the way the African-American servants were portrayed, particularly in their dialog.  "Dese chillun ain' nebbah gonna larn no mannahs ifn dey parents don't teach 'em diffrunt!" vs. "These children ain't ever going to learn manners if their parents don't teach them differently!"

Children's literature was often heavy-handed preaching.  Yes, Louisa May Alcott, I'm looking at you and your Old-Fashioned Girl

And I've found that a lot of free or low-cost ebooks on other sites are poorly OCRed, with no proofreading done.  Gutenberg does have the advantage of volunteer proofreaders, so you don't get to the last page of the murder mystery and have the detective announce "And the murderer is ... Efkdd9d!"

That happened to me recently!  We were talking about the Betsy-Tacy books that I loved as a child.  I found the whole set on Amazon for very little money so I bought them.  A couple chapters made me pretty darn uncomfortable.  When I bought them, I had planned on re-reading them and then passing on to my niece.  I won't be doing that now.

So now I'm not sure what to do with them.  I don't want them anymore. 


MommyPenguin

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Re: Vintage stories available for the iPad
« Reply #10 on: July 29, 2013, 01:38:14 PM »
Oh, that's too bad about the Betsy-Tacy books!  The first one is used in my daughter's homeschool curriculum, so we read that one and LOVED it.  I don't remember any racist undertones or anything like that?  It's possible that our version was edited or something, though.  The only part that I remember bothering me only did so because it was so sad... Tacy's toddler sister died.  I was struggling to read through my tears.

jaxsue

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Re: Vintage stories available for the iPad
« Reply #11 on: July 29, 2013, 02:01:59 PM »
Do they have The Boxcar Children?

Great book!

Hillia

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Re: Vintage stories available for the iPad
« Reply #12 on: July 29, 2013, 02:02:20 PM »
I looove Project Gutenberg; my Kindle is full of Jane Austen, Kipling, Sherlock Holmes, L Frank Baum, Fitzgerald, all sorts of goodies!  I'd love to put some of the audio books on my Windows phone - does anyone know if that's possible?  I tried saving an .mp3 to my phone but it wouldn't save.

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Twik

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Re: Vintage stories available for the iPad
« Reply #13 on: July 29, 2013, 05:28:21 PM »
Children's literature was often heavy-handed preaching.  Yes, Louisa May Alcott, I'm looking at you and your Old-Fashioned Girl

Well, unfortunately, people still preach heavy-handedly in children's literature, just they choose different topics. I'm looking at you, "The Acid Rain Colouring Book".

(Yes, that is a genuine product.)
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daen

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Re: Vintage stories available for the iPad
« Reply #14 on: August 04, 2013, 10:23:30 AM »
Years ago, I found an anthology (edited by Howard Hayes) in my library called "The Boy's Book of Detective Stories" or something similar. It introduced me to The Thinking Machine (by Jaques Futrelle) , Max Carrados (Ernest Bramah), The Old Man In The Corner (Baroness Orczy), Uncle Abner (Melville Davison Post), Dr. Thorndyke (R Austin Freeman), Martin Hewitt (Arthur Morrison), and a few others, all published before 1940.

 This year, I've been visiting gutenberg.net & gutenberg.net.au and found  them again. I've read quite a few more stories featuring each, and they are quite enjoyable. Casual racism does show up from time to time (I've noticed that in some of the early Ngaio Marsh mysteries, too), which takes me out of the story. Some are better than others - SS Van Dine, author of the Philo Vance mysteries, has surprised me more than once by undercutting at least some of the racism expressed by some characters by the words/actions of other characters.

By the way - if you're interested in forensics, definitely check out Dr. Thorndyke.

(edited to remove a surplus sentence.)
« Last Edit: August 04, 2013, 10:25:03 AM by daen »