A Civil World. Off-topic discussions on a variety of topics. > Time For a Coffee Break!

Vintage stories available for the iPad

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AmethystAnne:
I've always had a fondness for the stories that my maternal grandparents would have read during their lifetime, particularly those that were published prior to the mid 1940's.

As a young girl, I would go into their attic and select a book from the bow-front secretary and sit and read. The 3 that I particularly remember are Emerson's Essays, the Bobbsey Twins, and Grace Livingston Hill.

Many years have gone by since then. I have borrowed and enjoyed many vintage books from the library. In April 2012, DH gave me an iPad. So. Much. Fun!!! Games, and Internet, and to be able to download books? And not be chained to a wall outlet? Dang! How much better can it get?  ;D

[I now have Emerson's Essays and lots of Grace Livingston Hill books on my iPad. No Bobbsey Twins, yet.]

I found an Internet site  http://www.gutenberg.org  that has an incredible(!) amount of vintage books available to be downloaded onto the iPad.

Through the iBooks app, I have found other vintage books. Right now, I am thoroughly enjoying a book called, "The Complete Works of Eleanor Hodgman Porter" She was the author who wrote the book that the movie "Pollyanna" was based on (the movies are a little different than the book. "Pollyanna Grows Up" is wonderful!)

Has anybody found 'old friends' via the Internet that they enjoyed pre-Internet?

siamesecat2965:

--- Quote from: AmethystAnne on July 28, 2013, 12:38:38 PM ---I've always had a fondness for the stories that my maternal grandparents would have read during their lifetime, particularly those that were published prior to the mid 1940's.

As a young girl, I would go into their attic and select a book from the bow-front secretary and sit and read. The 3 that I particularly remember are Emerson's Essays, the Bobbsey Twins, and Grace Livingston Hill.

Many years have gone by since then. I have borrowed and enjoyed many vintage books from the library. In April 2012, DH gave me an iPad. So. Much. Fun!!! Games, and Internet, and to be able to download books? And not be chained to a wall outlet? Dang! How much better can it get?  ;D

[I now have Emerson's Essays and lots of Grace Livingston Hill books on my iPad. No Bobbsey Twins, yet.]

I found an Internet site  http://www.gutenberg.org  that has an incredible(!) amount of vintage books available to be downloaded onto the iPad.

Through the iBooks app, I have found other vintage books. Right now, I am thoroughly enjoying a book called, "The Complete Works of Eleanor Hodgman Porter" She was the author who wrote the book that the movie "Pollyanna" was based on (the movies are a little different than the book. "Pollyanna Grows Up" is wonderful!)

Has anybody found 'old friends' via the Internet that they enjoyed pre-Internet?

--- End quote ---

Not so much via the Internet, but e-books, specifically, kindle. As a kid, I loved the Cherry Ames nursing series, and while they've been available for a while in Kindle format, they were 9.99 each, so I wasn't going to buy them. A few months back, they dropped in price to 2.99, and a couple of them, which said they were one volume, contained several!  I've also found and purchased some others I enjoyed reading as a kid/teenager.

PeterM:
Gutenberg.org is awesome. They were providing ebooks long before most people ever heard of the concept, let alone the word itself. And I'm amazed at what's in the public domain. I was under the impression that Sherlock Holmes, for example, was not in the PD because of various lawsuits by the Doyle estate. But if you go to Gutenberg, there it is.

It comes in handy at my job, too. I work at a library and am one of two people who handle all the help requests for the county's downloadable library books. We offer all the public domain classics, many of them straight from Gutenberg, but our system sometimes gets in the way. I had a woman yesterday who couldn't download Austen's Emma. I gave her a few things to try but told her she might as well just go to Gutenberg and download it to keep rather than have it disappear in three weeks.

Last week I helped an older gentleman who was absolutely delighted to see Gutenberg's wide variety of books. He found several memoirs of British officers serving in Asia during the 19th century. At most 50 people in the world had downloaded this stuff in the past, but he was extremely excited to be number 51. I showed him how to move the files to his Kindle and he was off to the races.

jaxsue:
I'm so glad I'm not the only person who's enjoyed vintage literature! I read modern stuff, too, but there's pleasure in old books (I own enough of them!).

Thanks for the link, OP.

Tea Drinker:
One delight of Project Gutenberg is the random stuff. A few months ago, I happened to look at the "recently added" page there, and saw "In Northern Mists," by Fridtjof Nansen. A several-hundred-page history of European exploration of the north, going back to classical times. And written before the first world war. Lots of detail, at least one place where I was thinking "I hope he lived long enough to see this one," and some things that more recent research has refuted. I would never have gone looking for this, but I'm glad I came across it.

The beauty of this is that, as with library books, the only investment is time: I can read a few pages and see whether I like something, or stop partway through, and not push on because I paid for the book. (Knowing about the sunk cost fallacy doesn't always help.)

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