A Civil World. Off-topic discussions on a variety of topics. > Time For a Coffee Break!

Vintage stories available for the iPad

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jayhawk:
Do they have The Boxcar Children?

MommyPenguin:
Thanks so much for mentioning this!  I just set my daughter up with the first Bobbsey Twins book.  She's thrilled.  Although she says it's not a mystery so far, and she's well into it.  I wonder if the series didn't start out to be mysteries or something.

I haven't checked for the Boxcar Children, but I do know that my library had the first 12 books (the ones actually written by Gertrude Warner) available as a single download.  So you could check your library to see if they have it, if the Gutenberg Project doesn't (I wouldn't think they'd be old enough, although I wouldn't have thought the Bobbsey Twins were, either).

Katana_Geldar:
A lot of classics are available free through iBooks, including all but a few of the Anne of Green Gables series.

Elfmama:
Yes, they have the Boxcar Children.

Much of the older stuff is enjoyable, but I recently re-read some of the things that I enjoyed as a kid and just cringe at it now.  Lots of casual racism that nobody (read that as "no book-buying pre-civil-rights-era white person") thought anything of at the time it was written.  And unfortunately, the early Bobbsey Twins books hit that mark exactly.  Comparing the ones that were from my mother's era with the ones written when I was a kid there are significant differences in the way the African-American servants were portrayed, particularly in their dialog.  "Dese chillun ain' nebbah gonna larn no mannahs ifn dey parents don't teach 'em diffrunt!" vs. "These children ain't ever going to learn manners if their parents don't teach them differently!"

Children's literature was often heavy-handed preaching.  Yes, Louisa May Alcott, I'm looking at you and your Old-Fashioned Girl. 

And I've found that a lot of free or low-cost ebooks on other sites are poorly OCRed, with no proofreading done.  Gutenberg does have the advantage of volunteer proofreaders, so you don't get to the last page of the murder mystery and have the detective announce "And the murderer is ... Efkdd9d!"

EmmaJ.:

--- Quote from: Elfmama on July 28, 2013, 10:46:16 PM ---Yes, they have the Boxcar Children.

Much of the older stuff is enjoyable, but I recently re-read some of the things that I enjoyed as a kid and just cringe at it now.  Lots of casual racism that nobody (read that as "no book-buying pre-civil-rights-era white person") thought anything of at the time it was written.  And unfortunately, the early Bobbsey Twins books hit that mark exactly.  Comparing the ones that were from my mother's era with the ones written when I was a kid there are significant differences in the way the African-American servants were portrayed, particularly in their dialog.  "Dese chillun ain' nebbah gonna larn no mannahs ifn dey parents don't teach 'em diffrunt!" vs. "These children ain't ever going to learn manners if their parents don't teach them differently!"

Children's literature was often heavy-handed preaching.  Yes, Louisa May Alcott, I'm looking at you and your Old-Fashioned Girl. 

And I've found that a lot of free or low-cost ebooks on other sites are poorly OCRed, with no proofreading done.  Gutenberg does have the advantage of volunteer proofreaders, so you don't get to the last page of the murder mystery and have the detective announce "And the murderer is ... Efkdd9d!"

--- End quote ---

That happened to me recently!  We were talking about the Betsy-Tacy books that I loved as a child.  I found the whole set on Amazon for very little money so I bought them.  A couple chapters made me pretty darn uncomfortable.  When I bought them, I had planned on re-reading them and then passing on to my niece.  I won't be doing that now.

So now I'm not sure what to do with them.  I don't want them anymore. 

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