General Etiquette > Life...in general

Rudeness on top of rudeness

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*inviteseller:

Long BG -
DD (7 years) and myself were at an event at the zoo tonight.  The elephants were out in a large open area and everyone was at the rope that separated them from us but they were coming over and are able to be touched.  So of course it is VERY crowded with a lot of kids and adults trying to get pets and pictures.  My DD and I walk up but I told her to wait her turn to get up to the rope and she and I are just watching them and listening to the keeper talk about them and answer questions.  We were behind the first row of people at the ropes (think large room divided in half width wide with people lined up the whole length down).  Everyone was being respectful..adults moving so little ones could get up front, no one 'hogging' space, just coming and going.  We are having fun watching momma and her baby when all of a sudden this woman, I would guess in her 50's, comes barreling up with her camera in front of her face, squealing, and hits my into my DD and keeps walking, now proceeding to push her forward.  I grab DD to keep her from falling into the line of people in front of us, and say to the woman, who is still squealing and snapping pictures, "Excuse me, you just elbowed my DD in the head and pushed her."  I did not yell, I said it in a neutral tone, but this woman had to have known she mowed my child down as she literally was pushing into my child as she walked and my DD was being propelled forward into the crowd.  She turned to me, looks down at DD (who is small) and says "You should know that  happens in crowds and she needs to watch out!"   :o :o  Cue me and the 2 women in front of her, who she was know leaning and pushing into over just gaping at her.  I wisely bit my tongue and we moved down to an opening at the rope, but why, oh why do people feel that they can make excuses for boorish behavior ??  Is it all right to call people out, in neutral tones, when they act like that?

Shoo:

--- Quote from: *inviteseller on August 01, 2013, 01:07:48 AM ---
Long BG -
DD (7 years) and myself were at an event at the zoo tonight.  The elephants were out in a large open area and everyone was at the rope that separated them from us but they were coming over and are able to be touched.  So of course it is VERY crowded with a lot of kids and adults trying to get pets and pictures.  My DD and I walk up but I told her to wait her turn to get up to the rope and she and I are just watching them and listening to the keeper talk about them and answer questions.  We were behind the first row of people at the ropes (think large room divided in half width wide with people lined up the whole length down).  Everyone was being respectful..adults moving so little ones could get up front, no one 'hogging' space, just coming and going.  We are having fun watching momma and her baby when all of a sudden this woman, I would guess in her 50's, comes barreling up with her camera in front of her face, squealing, and hits my into my DD and keeps walking, now proceeding to push her forward.  I grab DD to keep her from falling into the line of people in front of us, and say to the woman, who is still squealing and snapping pictures, "Excuse me, you just elbowed my DD in the head and pushed her."  I did not yell, I said it in a neutral tone, but this woman had to have known she mowed my child down as she literally was pushing into my child as she walked and my DD was being propelled forward into the crowd.  She turned to me, looks down at DD (who is small) and says "You should know that  happens in crowds and she needs to watch out!"   :o :o  Cue me and the 2 women in front of her, who she was know leaning and pushing into over just gaping at her.  I wisely bit my tongue and we moved down to an opening at the rope, but why, oh why do people feel that they can make excuses for boorish behavior ??  Is it all right to call people out, in neutral tones, when they act like that?

--- End quote ---

If someone knocked my 7 year old child in the head, I'd be calling her out in very colorful tones.  So yes, it is perfectly all right to use neutral tones, though she certainly deserves more.

twiggy:
then *she* should know about crowds and be especially aware of her surroundings to make sure she isn't hitting someone who isn't "watching out"

SMH

wheeitsme:
Oh.  So it's okay to elbow/push/hit people/children in the head as long as you are in a crowd.  Somehow I seem to have missed that exception in my knowledge of the law.  ???

cwm:

--- Quote from: wheeitsme on August 01, 2013, 01:34:30 PM ---Oh.  So it's okay to elbow/push/hit people/children in the head as long as you are in a crowd.  Somehow I seem to have missed that exception in my knowledge of the law.  ???

--- End quote ---

Forget knowledge of the law, I must have missed that in my knowledge of human decency!

Seriously, OP, you did great. I probably wouldn't have been so polite in that situation. Some people are just rude boors.

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