General Etiquette > All In A Day's Work

How to clarify why contractor was rejected? (long, sorry) (dog pic, post 29)

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Onyx_TKD:

--- Quote from: wonderfullyanonymous on August 21, 2013, 11:08:36 AM ---
--- Quote from: RooRoo on August 20, 2013, 07:00:12 PM ---
See, dogs are not great judges of character. Someone who is comfy with dogs can easily befriend them, in spite of being dishonest, lazy, and/or liars.*



--- End quote ---


This is not true. We had a New Foundland who loved every body. I brought a prospective boyfriend home, who liked dogs, and was comfy around them. The Newfy layed on the floor and growled at him. Prospective boyfriend turned into not gonna happen, because of the dogs reaction.

I also had a lab mix when my kids were little, and one night I went to pick my BFF's DH from work. I had my dog, and both her dogs in the car. My dog, and their Dobey mix loved everybody, and neither had a mean bone in their body. Their German Shepard on the other had would have eaten you first, then asked questions later. Anyway, I was stopped at a stop light, there was a guy walking across the street about 5 ft away from the car, my dog went OFF. He wasn't even looking at the car. BFF's DH and I looked at each other and locked the doors. If my dog didn't like him, he was bad to the bone.

P.S. OP your dogs are adorable!

--- End quote ---

But those examples don't actually contradict RooRoo's point. All your examples show is that friendly dogs sometimes react badly to people and that you as their owner trust their reactions enough to act on them with no further evidence.

You never mentioned any other evidence that there was actually anything "bad" about either of these two guys. Maybe they were horrible people. But for all you know, they could be saints and your dog's had one bad reaction based on something that had nothing to do with their character. The potential boyfriend got dropped, so the dog's impression never got confirmed or disproved. The other guy was just walking by, so again, no chance for the dog's impression to be supported or not. You simply assumed that A) the dog was reacting to their character rather than something else and B) the dog was right. In these cases, there was little harm in trusting the dog's impression. You weren't yet invested in the potential boyfriend and you never had any actual interaction with the guy walking by anyway, so there was no harm in deciding you'd rather avoid them both. Putting more trust in someone based solely on a dog's reaction, as RooRoo cautioned against, is a bit riskier (and, I suppose, you're also more likely to find out whether or not it was a mistake).

wonderfullyanonymous:

--- Quote from: Onyx_TKD on August 21, 2013, 03:31:20 PM ---
--- Quote from: wonderfullyanonymous on August 21, 2013, 11:08:36 AM ---
--- Quote from: RooRoo on August 20, 2013, 07:00:12 PM ---
See, dogs are not great judges of character. Someone who is comfy with dogs can easily befriend them, in spite of being dishonest, lazy, and/or liars.*



--- End quote ---


This is not true. We had a New Foundland who loved every body. I brought a prospective boyfriend home, who liked dogs, and was comfy around them. The Newfy layed on the floor and growled at him. Prospective boyfriend turned into not gonna happen, because of the dogs reaction.

I also had a lab mix when my kids were little, and one night I went to pick my BFF's DH from work. I had my dog, and both her dogs in the car. My dog, and their Dobey mix loved everybody, and neither had a mean bone in their body. Their German Shepard on the other had would have eaten you first, then asked questions later. Anyway, I was stopped at a stop light, there was a guy walking across the street about 5 ft away from the car, my dog went OFF. He wasn't even looking at the car. BFF's DH and I looked at each other and locked the doors. If my dog didn't like him, he was bad to the bone.

P.S. OP your dogs are adorable!

--- End quote ---

But those examples don't actually contradict RooRoo's point. All your examples show is that friendly dogs sometimes react badly to people and that you as their owner trust their reactions enough to act on them with no further evidence.

You never mentioned any other evidence that there was actually anything "bad" about either of these two guys. Maybe they were horrible people. But for all you know, they could be saints and your dog's had one bad reaction based on something that had nothing to do with their character. The potential boyfriend got dropped, so the dog's impression never got confirmed or disproved. The other guy was just walking by, so again, no chance for the dog's impression to be supported or not. You simply assumed that A) the dog was reacting to their character rather than something else and B) the dog was right. In these cases, there was little harm in trusting the dog's impression. You weren't yet invested in the potential boyfriend and you never had any actual interaction with the guy walking by anyway, so there was no harm in deciding you'd rather avoid them both. Putting more trust in someone based solely on a dog's reaction, as RooRoo cautioned against, is a bit riskier (and, I suppose, you're also more likely to find out whether or not it was a mistake).

--- End quote ---

Sorry, I did forget to say that prospective boyfriend was a lazy no good liar. As for guy walking near car, I don't know, but I would stand by that dogs reaction. I did watch her one time protect a younger neighbor kid from a teenage relative, who I think, thought he was going to come over and beat up younger neighbor kid. Older teenage neighbor came across the street very aggressively, she put herself between the 2 of them, lowered her head, hair up and growled a warning. Teenage boy changed his mind, and went the other way. My dog watched him then went back to playing with the kids.

weeblewobble:
Seriously?  That is incredibly unprofessional on his part. You're the client.  A "decision of this magnitude" is yours to make, not his. And he certainly has no right to criticize you for making said decision.  It wouldn't matter if you chose a contractor based on his wearing a pink polka dotted tool belt.  It's your decision to make, period.  The fact that he responded this way shows how difficult he would be to work with.  You made the right choice.

rigs32:
My dad was a contractor.  Providing estimates is part of the job and you know you won't get every job.  The fact that #4 took so long AND tried to manipulate you makes me angry.  My dad knew his might not be the lowest price, but often got work because people liked him better.  And if he didn't get that job, maybe he'd get the next or the client would pass his name along to someone else.

weeblewobble:

--- Quote from: rigs32 on August 22, 2013, 12:52:09 PM ---My dad was a contractor.  Providing estimates is part of the job and you know you won't get every job.  The fact that #4 took so long AND tried to manipulate you makes me angry.  My dad knew his might not be the lowest price, but often got work because people liked him better.  And if he didn't get that job, maybe he'd get the next or the client would pass his name along to someone else.

--- End quote ---

POD.  We had a fairly small, but intricate, custom carpentry job we wanted for our house last year.  We talked to three different people. None of them behaved as badly as contractor number 4 above.  But we did like one carpenter better than the others, based on how comfortable we were talking to him and how much he listened to our input.  Despite the fact that his estimate was $200 more than the others, we hired him.  His work was great and we would be happy to hire him again.

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