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  • August 16, 2017, 05:18:48 PM

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Author Topic: Car vanity  (Read 1595 times)

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Harriet Jones

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Re: Car vanity
« Reply #30 on: August 14, 2017, 02:40:22 PM »
I also would recommend dealing with the rust rather than just letting it go, especially if you're planning on keeping the car for a while.  Rust will just get worse with time.  You could probably ask at an auto parts store if they have any low-cost suggestions.

TracyXJ

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Re: Car vanity
« Reply #31 on: August 14, 2017, 03:08:33 PM »
2006 Ford Escape (pronounced "es-KAH-pay) hybrid with a number of dings and scratches and mud on the floor.  I keep telling myself it's a work truck.

But I do covet an elegant, meticulously maintained sedan. Maybe a Jaguar or Mercedes.  Someday.  ::)

Es-KAH-pay.  Hey, that's spelled just like escape!

Some of my less vain cars have been:  a '96 Chrysler Town and Country (with peeling paint on the roof and shredded interior), '02 BMW (no idea what number it was, why can't they just use names?), and a '96 Thunderbird (with a paint job from a spray can and shredded interior).  And I loved all of them.

My more vain cars have been a brand new Mustang that was my baby, and now my '13 Mini Cooper which unfortunately was a smoker's car before I got it.

I've always thought dents and dings (unless it's the first one - that one always sucks) just add to the character of the car.  Shows that it lived and wasn't hidden in a garage and never driven!  I only worried about fixing the paint when it was a risk of the sheet metal rusting because the lack of it.  And then it was usually done with a spray can or what my DH calls the 20ft job by Maaco.  As in the cheapest paint job they do that looks fine from 20ft away, but not so good from up close. 

VorFemme

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Re: Car vanity
« Reply #32 on: August 14, 2017, 04:10:50 PM »
I have an old Bissell Green Clean Machine - seventeen or so years ago, a friend brought over her "new" minivan.  Her husband had the bright idea of buying a used vehicle from a car rental company to save money.  This was back when people still smoked in rental cars, apparently...because it stank.

A spray of cleaning solution and sucking up the spray (and making two or three passes to get the upholstery & carpet wet enough that a lot of dirt, tar, and nicotine got loosened by the cleaning solution and then more passes to make sure that we'd sucked up as much of the fluid as possible) were followed by leaving the vehicle in my driveway with every window that would open was cracked open while it dried in the summer sunshine...did wonders for the "atmosphere" in that van.  I think that I used the allergy removal concentrate - just to leave some kind of fragrance behind...

It works on carpet & cloth upholstery - leather needs a lot of saddle soap...but saddle soap certainly smells better than tobacco!

A citrus air freshener cuts through tobacco better than a flower scent.  And slip covers for the seats (or even an XL T-shirt on the back) will make the front seats look a little better...as long as they fit snugly.

I had a friend years ago who got one of the family cars in a divorce, she had just enough money to get fabric to replace the center panels in the buckets seats and a friend who worked in an upholstery shop who did it for her.  The vinyl was in relatively good shape - the fabric had shredded...I sometimes wondered if her husband had done something with a knife before turning it over to her...but it might have been in bad shape before the divorce...she brought it to show me the upholstery job because she knew that I'd appreciate good sewing.
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I explain?

PastryGoddess

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Re: Car vanity
« Reply #33 on: August 14, 2017, 04:26:40 PM »
2006 Ford Escape (pronounced "es-KAH-pay) hybrid with a number of dings and scratches and mud on the floor.  I keep telling myself it's a work truck.

But I do covet an elegant, meticulously maintained sedan. Maybe a Jaguar or Mercedes.  Someday.  ::)

Es-KAH-pay.  Hey, that's spelled just like escape!

Some of my less vain cars have been:  a '96 Chrysler Town and Country (with peeling paint on the roof and shredded interior), '02 BMW (no idea what number it was, why can't they just use names?), and a '96 Thunderbird (with a paint job from a spray can and shredded interior).  And I loved all of them.

My more vain cars have been a brand new Mustang that was my baby, and now my '13 Mini Cooper which unfortunately was a smoker's car before I got it.

I've always thought dents and dings (unless it's the first one - that one always sucks) just add to the character of the car.  Shows that it lived and wasn't hidden in a garage and never driven!  I only worried about fixing the paint when it was a risk of the sheet metal rusting because the lack of it.  And then it was usually done with a spray can or what my DH calls the 20ft job by Maaco.  As in the cheapest paint job they do that looks fine from 20ft away, but not so good from up close. 

Have you tried ozone treatments to get rid of the smoke smell?  My last car I bought from my aunt and uncle who are chain smokers...I have asthma ::)  It took 2 ozone treatments about a week apart, but the smoke smell was completely removed. 

jpcher

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Re: Car vanity
« Reply #34 on: August 14, 2017, 05:41:53 PM »
Thank you, everybody, for your responses. It's good to know that I'm not the only one who loves a strong running car even though it has some dings on it. I loved reading some of your stories about your favorite cars ever! ;D

I think that if you really love the car, taking it to someplace that specializes in repainting cars and getting the whole thing painted might be your best bet.  It has to be cheaper than buying a reliable car new or used and your vanity is preserved.

Yes, it would be much cheaper than purchasing a new car. For my next car purchase I would go new (unless I get my MIL's used car again ;)*)



I agree with everybody else that said if I plan on using the car until it dies then getting it repainted would be worth it.

Try contacting your local technical college and see if they have automotive classes in painting and if they would be willing to repaint your car as a class project.

I will look into this, however I think that maybe they might want to have the car for a longer period of time? I'd have to rent a car for the time that they have it. But it's a great thought.


My BIL is very rich, up until a year ago he drove an ancient pick up truck because he happened to like it the best.  He owns other cars and trucks that are beautiful, but that old pick up was his favorite.  If you love the car, just drive on!

 ;D


Someday, when I can, I will have my convertible Mustang! 

Oh. Yes. That has always been my dream car. Dark green, but it must be an automatic.



Momiitz -- Interesting thought of magnets. Do they come in hood/roof size? This would be a very quick cosmetic fix!

Dazi -- The plasti dip sounds extremely intriguing! I didn't go in depth with the web site, but I could change the color of my car every couple of years if I chose!


I also would recommend dealing with the rust rather than just letting it go, especially if you're planning on keeping the car for a while.  Rust will just get worse with time.  You could probably ask at an auto parts store if they have any low-cost suggestions.

Yes. This is a must do, thank you for mentioning it. Especially before winter this year with snow/salt and all that. The only rust spots are on the roof of my car but I can imagine it rusting through and then ending up with a leaky roof long before the engine life gives up the ghost. With the other spots, there seems to be a good primer base, so no rust there (yet).


If you want to put in a little time and effort, you could try sanding down those areas, and use spray cans of primer and matching paint. It won't be a flawless finish unless you're willing to put in serious time and effort and either match the color exactly or paint the entire car, but a close-enough match would go mostly unnoticed.

I did do my research and watched quite a few videos on DYI car painting, thinking that this might be an option. I don't have the tools/space/wherewithall to even attempt doing it myself.


I say keep the car and don't worry about the paint. Personally my worry would be if I got it painted, and spent all that money, then a month later it dies for good. (I realize you keep it in great shape but you really never know with old cars.) Then you'd be thinking "I wish I didn't spend money to get it painted because I could put that towards my new car".  Keep the car until it dies or is not safe to drive anymore. Save the 'paint job' money as a down payment on a future new car.

Bold above: LOL! Yeah, I thought the same thing. Murphy's Law. ::)

I'm doing a bunch of home improvement projects so my budget is tight right now but I want to, at the very least before winter sets in, get the rust spots sanded and primed.


Again, thank you all for your responses! ;D




*My last three cars (all Grand Marquis, I LOVE those cars!) were bought from my MIL who buys a new car every couple-three years. She sells her used ones to family members for whatever the dealer would give for a trade-in (excellent deal). One I sold, just to upgrade by buying MIL's newer car. The newer car I gave to the DDs when they started driving and bought yet another from my MIL (the one I have now). She now has a Lincoln, but my SIL is chiming in "Jpcher got how many cars from you? I waaant one!" (no, she's not whining ;), to be fair I think she should have first option.)

TracyXJ

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Re: Car vanity
« Reply #35 on: Yesterday at 08:38:19 AM »
2006 Ford Escape (pronounced "es-KAH-pay) hybrid with a number of dings and scratches and mud on the floor.  I keep telling myself it's a work truck.

But I do covet an elegant, meticulously maintained sedan. Maybe a Jaguar or Mercedes.  Someday.  ::)

Es-KAH-pay.  Hey, that's spelled just like escape!

Some of my less vain cars have been:  a '96 Chrysler Town and Country (with peeling paint on the roof and shredded interior), '02 BMW (no idea what number it was, why can't they just use names?), and a '96 Thunderbird (with a paint job from a spray can and shredded interior).  And I loved all of them.

My more vain cars have been a brand new Mustang that was my baby, and now my '13 Mini Cooper which unfortunately was a smoker's car before I got it.

I've always thought dents and dings (unless it's the first one - that one always sucks) just add to the character of the car.  Shows that it lived and wasn't hidden in a garage and never driven!  I only worried about fixing the paint when it was a risk of the sheet metal rusting because the lack of it.  And then it was usually done with a spray can or what my DH calls the 20ft job by Maaco.  As in the cheapest paint job they do that looks fine from 20ft away, but not so good from up close. 

Have you tried ozone treatments to get rid of the smoke smell?  My last car I bought from my aunt and uncle who are chain smokers...I have asthma ::)  It took 2 ozone treatments about a week apart, but the smoke smell was completely removed.

We had the dealership do a de-ionizing treatment before we took it home.  Since then we've used a steam cleaner on all the cloth surfaces, making sure to really get the headliner and we've gotten these Meguiars Air Refreshers that have worked wonders.  I've had to do it twice, about a month apart, the last one was about 2 months ago.  I'm getting a faint smell when I first get in the car at the end of the day if it's been humid and hot. 

NFPwife

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Re: Car vanity
« Reply #36 on: Yesterday at 09:28:19 AM »
Thank you, everybody, for your responses. It's good to know that I'm not the only one who loves a strong running car even though it has some dings on it. I loved reading some of your stories about your favorite cars ever! ;D

I think that if you really love the car, taking it to someplace that specializes in repainting cars and getting the whole thing painted might be your best bet.  It has to be cheaper than buying a reliable car new or used and your vanity is preserved.

Yes, it would be much cheaper than purchasing a new car. For my next car purchase I would go new (unless I get my MIL's used car again ;)*)



I agree with everybody else that said if I plan on using the car until it dies then getting it repainted would be worth it.

Try contacting your local technical college and see if they have automotive classes in painting and if they would be willing to repaint your car as a class project.

I will look into this, however I think that maybe they might want to have the car for a longer period of time? I'd have to rent a car for the time that they have it. But it's a great thought.


My BIL is very rich, up until a year ago he drove an ancient pick up truck because he happened to like it the best.  He owns other cars and trucks that are beautiful, but that old pick up was his favorite.  If you love the car, just drive on!

 ;D


Someday, when I can, I will have my convertible Mustang! 

Oh. Yes. That has always been my dream car. Dark green, but it must be an automatic.



Momiitz -- Interesting thought of magnets. Do they come in hood/roof size? This would be a very quick cosmetic fix!

Dazi -- The plasti dip sounds extremely intriguing! I didn't go in depth with the web site, but I could change the color of my car every couple of years if I chose!


I also would recommend dealing with the rust rather than just letting it go, especially if you're planning on keeping the car for a while.  Rust will just get worse with time.  You could probably ask at an auto parts store if they have any low-cost suggestions.

Yes. This is a must do, thank you for mentioning it. Especially before winter this year with snow/salt and all that. The only rust spots are on the roof of my car but I can imagine it rusting through and then ending up with a leaky roof long before the engine life gives up the ghost. With the other spots, there seems to be a good primer base, so no rust there (yet).


If you want to put in a little time and effort, you could try sanding down those areas, and use spray cans of primer and matching paint. It won't be a flawless finish unless you're willing to put in serious time and effort and either match the color exactly or paint the entire car, but a close-enough match would go mostly unnoticed.

I did do my research and watched quite a few videos on DYI car painting, thinking that this might be an option. I don't have the tools/space/wherewithall to even attempt doing it myself.


I say keep the car and don't worry about the paint. Personally my worry would be if I got it painted, and spent all that money, then a month later it dies for good. (I realize you keep it in great shape but you really never know with old cars.) Then you'd be thinking "I wish I didn't spend money to get it painted because I could put that towards my new car".  Keep the car until it dies or is not safe to drive anymore. Save the 'paint job' money as a down payment on a future new car.

Bold above: LOL! Yeah, I thought the same thing. Murphy's Law. ::)

I'm doing a bunch of home improvement projects so my budget is tight right now but I want to, at the very least before winter sets in, get the rust spots sanded and primed.


Again, thank you all for your responses! ;D




*My last three cars (all Grand Marquis, I LOVE those cars!) were bought from my MIL who buys a new car every couple-three years. She sells her used ones to family members for whatever the dealer would give for a trade-in (excellent deal). One I sold, just to upgrade by buying MIL's newer car. The newer car I gave to the DDs when they started driving and bought yet another from my MIL (the one I have now). She now has a Lincoln, but my SIL is chiming in "Jpcher got how many cars from you? I waaant one!" (no, she's not whining ;), to be fair I think she should have first option.)

You're right the technical college will want the car for a while. If you know someone with a spare car you could borrow, it's worth it. Otherwise, you might have to pass on that.

As for the new car... I've been driving paid for used cars forever. Mine's in nice shape, but it's about 15 years old. Under 90K miles because I bought it with low miles and I barely drive it. I plan to keep mine as long as possible. It has a few dings, nothing major.  I like the Dave Ramsey rule of thumb on new cars - buy one if you can pay cash for the new car and don't have less than half your annual income tied up in depreciating assets.

So, if you make $80K annually, you spend up to $40K cash on a car. (If that car is the only depreciating asset. If you have a $10K boat, then it's $30K for the car.)

Personally, DH and I had the cash for a new car for him when we bought a couple years ago, but still went used because new cars go down in value the second they drive off the lot. (Shopping for the car and paying with a cashier's check was so baffling to the young car salesman. But that's another thread :D )

DavidH

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Re: Car vanity
« Reply #37 on: Yesterday at 10:36:49 AM »
I'm into cars in general, so I like to keep my car nice. 

I can definitely suggest getting the roof painted, since a rust through there is a major issue.  For the other areas and the age of the car, if you or someone you know is handy, or if you know a body shop, you might consider seeing if a scrapyard has a hood or trunk lid in the right color and if a body shop can just swap it out.  It's often cheaper than painting and sometimes you get lucky if they have a car that was scrapped for another reason. 

Painting it yourself can be done, but you'd want to prime it well and make sure all the rust was removed prior to painting to avoid it coming back.  Keep in mind that painting well is definitely a skill and that unless you are very good at it, it will likely not look perfect to say the least. 

Another option is to see if you can find a similar, low mileage car for sale.  Buyer of a Grand Marquis were often older and many are left with relatively low mileage in areas where there are large numbers of retirees.