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  • August 24, 2016, 08:24:08 PM

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Author Topic: S/O Professional Darwinism - Typing Stories  (Read 1937 times)

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zyrs

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Re: S/O Professional Darwinism - Typing Stories
« Reply #30 on: August 19, 2016, 05:53:30 AM »
 ;D I got an adjusted 18 wpm which is pretty good since for some reason if I touch type I tend to 'epyt ekil siht' and I always have to go back and correct at least half of what I type in real life because of it.  I have no idea why that happens, but it drove my typing teacher in High School to distraction.  'The quick nworb xof jumped revo eht lazy god' does not get you a passing grade.

jayhawk

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Re: S/O Professional Darwinism - Typing Stories
« Reply #31 on: August 19, 2016, 02:25:51 PM »
I learned on a manual typewriter in HS - if you took second semester, you go to use the electrics. I'm cracking up that this is now the latest thing for paper-crafters (scrapbooking, cardmaking): 

http://www.michaels.com/we-r-memory-keepers-typecast-typewriter-pink/10481060.html


available in black or pink.

magicdomino

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Re: S/O Professional Darwinism - Typing Stories
« Reply #32 on: August 19, 2016, 02:46:19 PM »


This is what my mother's typewriter looked like.  When I said antique, I meant antique.  :-)

Sirius

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Re: S/O Professional Darwinism - Typing Stories
« Reply #33 on: August 19, 2016, 03:28:47 PM »
I took typing in summer school in 1973, then spent most of my time as a cashier until 1982, when I got a job as a clerk typist.  I'd kept up the typing because I write for a hobby and wore out several manual and electric typewriters over the years.  Eventually I worked up to medical transcription, and I'm strange - I can transcribe dictated reports at about 90 wpm, but drop to 50 wpm if I'm having to transcribe a written report.  While I can touch type, I've got 25 years of transcribing dictations so I'm much more comfortable doing that.  I've also gotten to where I can barely type on a flat keyboard anymore.  I've been using ergonomic keyboards for years while doing medical transcription, and they are definitely easier on the carpal tunnels than flat  keyboards.  Mr. Sirius uses a laptop, and I can barely type on it. 

rose red

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Re: S/O Professional Darwinism - Typing Stories
« Reply #34 on: August 19, 2016, 05:38:41 PM »
For years I was more comfortable typing numbers from the top of the keyboard because that's how I leaned it on the typewriter. There were no computers with the handy side keypad back in the day. It made for some interesting looks when I got a job doing all numbers data entry during the computer era 8) ;D

gmatoy

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Re: S/O Professional Darwinism - Typing Stories
« Reply #35 on: August 19, 2016, 10:05:54 PM »
My guidance counselor in Jr. High signed us up for our classes for high school. She decided that I was oldest of 6, (true) poor, (not as true as she thought; we had a roof over our heads, nutritional food and adequate clothing) and female (true) with parents who didn't have higher education (true, dad had graduated from high school and mom finished the 8th grade... except my mother was a reader, curious about everything and determined that her children were going to all have a high school education)  so I obviously wasn't going to college.

That was a self fulfilling prediction, since the classes she put me in weren't college bound. My Junior year, I could select my classes and went for academic classes, but my GPA was already ruined. Manuel typing for a student who had been diagnosed with arthritis at 6. No, just no.

I finally went to college, did it in 4 years, graduating exactly 30 years and 1 day after my high school graduation! And I went to college while married, mother of two, working and unable to drive. I used public transportation in an area where it wasn't always the best way to get places. Shows if you really want something, go for it! But I will say I am grateful that I was able to use the computers at college, as I didn't have one at home then. Couldn't live without it now!

judecat

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Re: S/O Professional Darwinism - Typing Stories
« Reply #36 on: August 20, 2016, 02:23:27 AM »


This is what my mother's typewriter looked like.  When I said antique, I meant antique.  :-)


My mom had one of those when I was a little kid -- I learned the alphabet playing on it.  But I couldn't actually type -- took me two hands to depress each key, never mind shifting.


Mustard

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Re: S/O Professional Darwinism - Typing Stories
« Reply #37 on: August 20, 2016, 04:26:54 AM »
I learned to type on a manual machine very like the one pictured; it took some welly to depress the keys.  The first time I used an electric typewriter I had a a line of each letter I typed. MMMMMMMuuuuucccchhhhh eeeeaaassssiiiieeerrr ttttoooo uuuuussssseeeee....

HoneyBee42

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Re: S/O Professional Darwinism - Typing Stories
« Reply #38 on: August 20, 2016, 10:26:53 AM »
When I was in junior high, typing was an elective.  Almost all the class had to use manual typewriters, but as a reward for doing well (you had to hit 35wpm on the manual) you could use one of the three electric typewriters.

As it happened, I didn't really like the electric typewriter (the manual wasn't nearly as bad as some of the others shown/mentioned here), but I could have used it.  I later taught myself to type even better using a game (Typer Shark or something like that--it was made by PopCap, and put words on sharks and you had to type the word before it reached the other side of the screen; other levels had pirahnas with single letters, sharks with scrambled words, sharks/fish which were faded (so you couldn't see what was on them until they got halfway across the screen) and sharks that took two or three words to eliminate.  Much, much fun.)

When I was working relay, minimum to be hired was 60wpm and if you got 70wpm or better, you were enabled for Florida calls.  By the time I left, I was almost able to keep up with normal-speed human speech.  I've slowed down to around 80wpm now.

GreenHall

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Re: S/O Professional Darwinism - Typing Stories
« Reply #39 on: August 20, 2016, 11:54:00 AM »
When I was in junior high, typing was an elective.  Almost all the class had to use manual typewriters, but as a reward for doing well (you had to hit 35wpm on the manual) you could use one of the three electric typewriters.

As it happened, I didn't really like the electric typewriter (the manual wasn't nearly as bad as some of the others shown/mentioned here), but I could have used it.  I later taught myself to type even better using a game (Typer Shark or something like that--it was made by PopCap, and put words on sharks and you had to type the word before it reached the other side of the screen; other levels had pirahnas with single letters, sharks with scrambled words, sharks/fish which were faded (so you couldn't see what was on them until they got halfway across the screen) and sharks that took two or three words to eliminate.  Much, much fun.)

When I was working relay, minimum to be hired was 60wpm and if you got 70wpm or better, you were enabled for Florida calls.  By the time I left, I was almost able to keep up with normal-speed human speech.  I've slowed down to around 80wpm now.
I have to admit some curiousity why Florida calls require a higher wpm....

HoneyBee42

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Re: S/O Professional Darwinism - Typing Stories
« Reply #40 on: August 20, 2016, 12:36:03 PM »
It was some sort of legal thing.  I don't know the reason, but maybe turbo was more common (that can accept up to 90wpm), while the more traditional machines could only transmit at 60wpm

VorFemme

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Re: S/O Professional Darwinism - Typing Stories
« Reply #41 on: August 20, 2016, 02:50:46 PM »
When I was in junior high, typing was an elective.  Almost all the class had to use manual typewriters, but as a reward for doing well (you had to hit 35wpm on the manual) you could use one of the three electric typewriters.

As it happened, I didn't really like the electric typewriter (the manual wasn't nearly as bad as some of the others shown/mentioned here), but I could have used it.  I later taught myself to type even better using a game (Typer Shark or something like that--it was made by PopCap, and put words on sharks and you had to type the word before it reached the other side of the screen; other levels had pirahnas with single letters, sharks with scrambled words, sharks/fish which were faded (so you couldn't see what was on them until they got halfway across the screen) and sharks that took two or three words to eliminate.  Much, much fun.)

When I was working relay, minimum to be hired was 60wpm and if you got 70wpm or better, you were enabled for Florida calls.  By the time I left, I was almost able to keep up with normal-speed human speech.  I've slowed down to around 80wpm now.
I have to admit some curiousity why Florida calls require a higher wpm....

The insurance company that I worked for had a higher number of bilingual (English and Spanish, usually) employees answering phones in Florida - there was also a law about the office handling Florida calls being handled by offices & employees working *in* Florida, so there was a call center in Florida just for Florida claims.

The (large) building where I worked housed a call center for 12 or so states...and while "bilingual" employees got a raise over "English only" employees - but there weren't quite as many of them working there.  They were looking for more - but not as many people had good Spanish skills that included reading & writing.
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I explain?

#borecore

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Re: S/O Professional Darwinism - Typing Stories
« Reply #42 on: August 20, 2016, 07:20:05 PM »
68 WPM on one test just now. I had to take a typing test to qualify for my major at the end of my first semester of college, after averaging 60+ WPM in a high school class called "BCIS" (Business Computer Information Systems), which was a glorified "How to Use MS Office" course in which we were expected to log into the typing program every class after we finished our day's work.

Unfortunately, I knew my future was riding on it, and I freaked out. I failed the first time with 27 WPM (30 WPM minimum) because I made so many errors, not because I was slow. I was nearly in tears, but I pulled myself together and got a much higher score the second time (and never had to type anything quickly in my subsequent coursework).

I did learn to value fast typing recently, when I went back to school. Law school exams at my school were largely 3-hour essays on the computer. Fast typing is the only way to get everything you want to say out in time (and often, you still fall short).

Browyn

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Re: S/O Professional Darwinism - Typing Stories
« Reply #43 on: August 20, 2016, 08:03:36 PM »


This is what my mother's typewriter looked like.  When I said antique, I meant antique.  :-)


My mom had one of those when I was a little kid -- I learned the alphabet playing on it.  But I couldn't actually type -- took me two hands to depress each key, never mind shifting.

My Mom had one of those, I typed my high school papers on it.  When I finally had an electric typewriter in college I had trouble with getting double letters by accident because my keystroke was so hard.