Author Topic: What constitutes an emergency...  (Read 2675 times)

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SPuck

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What constitutes an emergency...
« on: August 17, 2013, 04:27:14 PM »
... or is there anything else I should have done?

I was out walking today and there was a dog on the loose. This is a dog that has a history of running wild (that I might have posted about before but can't find the thread), and it is normally skittish and runs away if it sees me. This time it decided to run up to me, and start barking, growling, and lunging at me. I got away by facing it and walking backwards. When I got home I called my town's non emergency police number who then sent me to animal control where I left a message because no one was there. Is there anything else I could have done? On the animal control number there was a message about calling a pager, but the dog didn't bite me so I wasn't sure if the situation constituted an emergency. 

Poppea

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Re: What constitutes an emergency...
« Reply #1 on: August 17, 2013, 04:33:11 PM »
... or is there anything else I should have done?

I was out walking today and there was a dog on the loose. This is a dog that has a history of running wild (that I might have posted about before but can't find the thread), and it is normally skittish and runs away if it sees me. This time it decided to run up to me, and start barking, growling, and lunging at me. I got away by facing it and walking backwards. When I got home I called my town's non emergency police number who then sent me to animal control where I left a message because no one was there. Is there anything else I could have done? On the animal control number there was a message about calling a pager, but the dog didn't bite me so I wasn't sure if the situation constituted an emergency.

To be honest if it was a small dog I might have just called animal control.  If it was a large or vicious breed I would have insisted on talking to an police officer.

gramma dishes

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Re: What constitutes an emergency...
« Reply #2 on: August 17, 2013, 04:46:54 PM »
...    This time it decided to run up to me, and start barking, growling, and lunging at me. ...

Growling and especially lunging are considered threatening behavior.  You walked away unscathed.  But there might be children walking home from school or a sweet little old neighbor lady in her 80's just going out to pick up her mail.  They might have fared less well. 

I think you were right to call about it.  No, he didn't bite you, but he may bite someone else.  The least you could have done was report it and you did the right thing by calling it to the attention of the authorities.

esposita

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Re: What constitutes an emergency...
« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2013, 05:26:21 PM »
I think you would have been within your rights to call the non-emergency police line back, and tell them there was no answer at the animal control and you really felt that there was a dangerous situation that needed attention *now*.

SPuck

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Re: What constitutes an emergency...
« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2013, 09:48:22 PM »
To be honest if it was a small dog I might have just called animal control.  If it was a large or vicious breed I would have insisted on talking to an police officer.

If this dog has been a small dog (it was medium sized, a black lab mix I think), and approached me the way it did I still would have followed the same actions. I thought for a moment that the dog has rabies with the way that it was growling at me.
« Last Edit: August 17, 2013, 09:56:55 PM by SPuck »

Outdoor Girl

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Re: What constitutes an emergency...
« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2013, 09:56:53 PM »
I would have called the pager, on top of leaving the message.  An aggressive dog on the loose in a residential area?  That's a recipe for disaster and I think it constitutes an emergency.
I have CDO.  It is like OCD but with the letters in alphabetical order, as they should be.
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veronaz

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Re: What constitutes an emergency...
« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2013, 10:01:44 PM »
Quote
I thought for a moment that the dog has rabies with the way that it was growling at me.

An aggressive dog running loose who you think might be rabid and is growling at you = emergency.

SPuck

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Re: What constitutes an emergency...
« Reply #7 on: August 17, 2013, 10:04:59 PM »
The only problem I had with calling is that our animal control isn't the best. As I mentioned before this dog is a previous escape artist (actually the owner just used to let it run loose before finally being told to hook it up), and when my neighbors who live closer buy used to call about the animal, animal control gave them suggestions for capturing it.

I think I might ask my neighbor if the dog has ever been aggressive with them when it got loose. Should I talk to them, and how should I bring it up?
« Last Edit: August 17, 2013, 10:14:52 PM by SPuck »

veronaz

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Re: What constitutes an emergency...
« Reply #8 on: August 17, 2013, 10:25:25 PM »
???  What is there to talk about?

I would not talk to them at all – what good would it do?  Dog owners are often very defensive; I doubt they would say “Yes, our dog has been aggressive”.

Whoever told people to try to catch it has a screw loose.  Catching loose dogs is the responsibility of animal control - that's what they get paid for.  If they won't do their job, go over their heads to whatever authority.

Frankly, I’m not seeing the dilemma.  This dog needs to be picked up by the authorities and their owner needs to be put on notice and fined.
« Last Edit: August 17, 2013, 10:47:44 PM by veronaz »

SPuck

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Re: What constitutes an emergency...
« Reply #9 on: August 17, 2013, 10:34:19 PM »
I wasn't talking about the dog owner. I was talking about my other neighbors who used to contact animal control when the dog got loose. Sorry if I wasn't clear.

I contacted both the police and animal control. It is out of my hands and the event has passed. Now I was just wondering if I should talk to other neighbors who had a history with the dog (who aren't the owners) and maybe warn them the dog has become aggressive?
« Last Edit: August 17, 2013, 10:38:26 PM by SPuck »

m2kbug

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Re: What constitutes an emergency...
« Reply #10 on: August 17, 2013, 10:45:51 PM »
At this point with the danger level, animal control might take more action.  If you have the address to the owners, I'd call it in and call the police department as well that this dog nearly attacked me the other day and is dangerous.  Talk to the other neighbor too.  If you don't know where this dog lives, these neighbors sound like they do.  They can call as well.  I don't think trying to capture this dog yourself is a very good idea, but I think they need to get out there and capture it or at the very least get tough with these people about keeping this dog contained.  You could also tell the dog owners personally if you know where they live. 
« Last Edit: August 17, 2013, 10:49:32 PM by m2kbug »

*inviteseller

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Re: What constitutes an emergency...
« Reply #11 on: August 17, 2013, 10:46:32 PM »
The poor thing has probably never been properly socialized and add in being let to run loose where there are so many dangers, it is probably terrified, thus the growling and barking.  If it was rabid, it would have not acted defensively.  Rabies affects the brains..it is almost like being on drugs, they walk funny, act funny not just normal "I am scared of you so I have to get you away from me".  If the dog was aggressive, it would have either chased you or lunged at you.  You do need to talk to animal control, over and over again, and call all the animal shelters in your area because many of them have humane agents (animal cops basically).  The dog catchers just, well, catch where a humane agent has more 'police' powers when it comes to dealing with not just the animals but prosecuting horrific owners too.  And strange as it sounds, when you are out walking, carry a few biscuits with you..if the dog starts again, throw some biscuits gently behind it and I bet he turns around to get the food and you can walk away. 

I do a lot of rescue and foster work associated with the local shelter in my area and it breaks my heart when humans take in animals but can't be bothered to properly take care of them, then the poor thing becomes a nuisance dog or cat through no fault of its own.

EMuir

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Re: What constitutes an emergency...
« Reply #12 on: August 18, 2013, 02:28:16 AM »
I would have called 911.  Just because the dog didn't actually bite you doesn't mean it might not bite someone else, especially someone who might run away.

shhh its me

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Re: What constitutes an emergency...
« Reply #13 on: August 18, 2013, 12:38:07 PM »
The poor thing has probably never been properly socialized and add in being let to run loose where there are so many dangers, it is probably terrified, thus the growling and barking.  If it was rabid, it would have not acted defensively.  Rabies affects the brains..it is almost like being on drugs, they walk funny, act funny not just normal "I am scared of you so I have to get you away from me".  If the dog was aggressive, it would have either chased you or lunged at you.  You do need to talk to animal control, over and over again, and call all the animal shelters in your area because many of them have humane agents (animal cops basically).  The dog catchers just, well, catch where a humane agent has more 'police' powers when it comes to dealing with not just the animals but prosecuting horrific owners too.  And strange as it sounds, when you are out walking, carry a few biscuits with you..if the dog starts again, throw some biscuits gently behind it and I bet he turns around to get the food and you can walk away. 

I do a lot of rescue and foster work associated with the local shelter in my area and it breaks my heart when humans take in animals but can't be bothered to properly take care of them, then the poor thing becomes a nuisance dog or cat through no fault of its own.

But lunge at OP is exactly what it did.   I think since you known that animal control isn't the greatest you could have called back the non emergency number and asked for help specifying "aggressive barking lunging  the dogs size" also it may not be fair but some breeds will get a quicker reaction "an aggressive labberdoddle " will not get the same reaction as "an aggressive pit bull"  ect. and asked for an officer to come out.

BarensMom

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Re: What constitutes an emergency...
« Reply #14 on: August 18, 2013, 01:06:32 PM »
I would have called the police back immediately and told them that AC was unavailable and that "you are in fear of your and other's safety."

Recently, we had another pair of vicious dogs loose in the neighborhood.  One Saturday those dogs:

- Tried to charge Baren and myself.  I backed them off with my "zap" cane (1M volts!);
- Charged and bit another woman's dog;
- Attacked and wounded a cat;
- Charged a man and his dog.  The man managed to get inside his house;
- Attacked and wounded another dog ($1400).

The police and AC were called.  The police arrived first and the dogs were herded into the back of the cruiser until AC arrived.

The kicker:  The owners paid the fine and agreed to keep the dogs under control, so they're back in the neighborhood.  Everyone else now carries a weapon when walking outside.