General Etiquette > Techno-quette

Deleting a non-inflammatory FB comment: do you ask why?

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Goosey:
Personally, I don't do anyone's research for them. If someone wants more information on what I've posted, unless it's something that I'm actively involved in and have references on hand, they should look it up themselves. Maybe that's where they're coming from?

Twik:

--- Quote from: Goosey on August 23, 2013, 03:09:55 PM ---Personally, I don't do anyone's research for them. If someone wants more information on what I've posted, unless it's something that I'm actively involved in and have references on hand, they should look it up themselves. Maybe that's where they're coming from?

--- End quote ---

That sounds like a bit of a conversation-killer.

"So, I hear you vacationed in Fiji. Is it hot this time of year?"

"You know, you could google that yourself."

Actually saying "I don't know," where appropriate, is much more polite than ignoring that someone is addressing you.

shhh its me:
   I wouldn't ask, it sort of like asking " ohh you have previous plans exactly what are they?"   FB isn't new but its still new enough that the etiquette is evolving still.   

AS to why they may have deleted I can think of a couple reasons.  They didn't want the discussion to get sidetracked into a question by question discussion or a debate   The person who deleted you comments knows the person you asked gives incorrect answers or gives long rambling answers.   So basiclay being a host and controlling the direction of the conversation.

I'm not implying you are guilty of this but I have known people who just keep going down a path once they start.  Using your questions as an example "what type of questions?'.......how did you answer , where did you fine the answers , was it a question like this or are they like that , how many questions are multiple choice , how many questions could you eliminated 2 of the answers right away, how long did you study , ect ect ect.  IT goes from one or two questions to a 2 hour tutoring  session , especially if its a difficult to get certification.   During a study session this may be ok but its too much if its a graduation party. Sort of like having a general discussion about movies and favorite scenes and a rabid star wars fans(I love stat wars and could have this discussion)wants to talk about ewoks for 2 hours.   Edited I didnt finish my thought ...If something like that happens a few times I can understand why someone would delete the first comment with "ewoks" in it .

Goosey:

--- Quote from: Twik on August 24, 2013, 12:00:09 AM ---
--- Quote from: Goosey on August 23, 2013, 03:09:55 PM ---Personally, I don't do anyone's research for them. If someone wants more information on what I've posted, unless it's something that I'm actively involved in and have references on hand, they should look it up themselves. Maybe that's where they're coming from?

--- End quote ---

That sounds like a bit of a conversation-killer.

"So, I hear you vacationed in Fiji. Is it hot this time of year?"

"You know, you could google that yourself."

Actually saying "I don't know," where appropriate, is much more polite than ignoring that someone is addressing you.

--- End quote ---

That's not what I'm referring to.

I'm referring to, say, when I post an article and someone wants more in depth information on the subject or persons in the article. Especially if they're trying to debate me, but they're not providing information to back up their statements.

And, if I just went to Fiji, that's information I have on hand. And I said "if it's something that I'm actively involved in" and have references on hand(including personal experience for a no-reference-needed conversation like that).

Yvaine:

--- Quote from: Goosey on August 24, 2013, 04:37:56 PM ---
--- Quote from: Twik on August 24, 2013, 12:00:09 AM ---
--- Quote from: Goosey on August 23, 2013, 03:09:55 PM ---Personally, I don't do anyone's research for them. If someone wants more information on what I've posted, unless it's something that I'm actively involved in and have references on hand, they should look it up themselves. Maybe that's where they're coming from?

--- End quote ---

That sounds like a bit of a conversation-killer.

"So, I hear you vacationed in Fiji. Is it hot this time of year?"

"You know, you could google that yourself."

Actually saying "I don't know," where appropriate, is much more polite than ignoring that someone is addressing you.

--- End quote ---

That's not what I'm referring to.

I'm referring to, say, when I post an article and someone wants more in depth information on the subject or persons in the article. Especially if they're trying to debate me, but they're not providing information to back up their statements.

And, if I just went to Fiji, that's information I have on hand. And I said "if it's something that I'm actively involved in" and have references on hand(including personal experience for a no-reference-needed conversation like that).

--- End quote ---

Yeah, this. There are "making conversation" questions and then there's throwing up a metaphorical Citation Needed sign, which isn't necessarily always a bad idea (like when someone is repeating a false urban legend) but can come off as confrontational in some situations.

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