Author Topic: No, I will not risk going to jail... Waterlight's Spine Story #5 (UD #18)  (Read 6621 times)

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Waterlight

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I had a run-in earlier this week with a job candidate I'll call Whine and Cheese.  We interviewed her last week and offered her a job... but this past Monday, she was a no-call, no-show for orientation.  We tried calling and emailing her and got no response whatsoever.

Then yesterday, I came into the office and found Whine and Cheese sitting in the waiting area outside it.  She claimed her purse had been stolen and, with it, her phone, her bus tickets and all her cash.  When I asked why she didn't ask to use a friend's or family member's phone, or go to the Internet terminals in the library to make contact, she said she didn't know anybody with a phone--and didn't answer my question about the library at all. 

Now, I sympathize IF there is any truth to Whine and Cheese's story... but I have reason to believe (as will be seen later) that's a very big IF.  One of the reasons I suspect her story isn't true--though it's something only another transit user like me would know--is that she lied about losing her bus tickets.  Our transit system uses a smart card, or cash, not bus tickets.

I got a written statement from her about the reasons for her no-call, no-show and sent her home.  It was in this statement that I found the "whine and cheese":  a few slices of "Why is this happening to meeeeeeeeeeeeeee" with a filled-to-the-brim glass of "I really, really want and neeeeeeeeeeeeeeed this job."

Job offer = cancelled.

Today, I opened my email and found a message from Whine and Cheese saying that because of "our mishap" she was having trouble getting a car loan.  She asked me to falsify information on the application for her car loan and say she was working full-time--and she'd change it later.   :o

What, ME risk 30 years in federal prison and/or a million-dollar fine for credit fraud, not to mention MY OWN job and the reputation of my employer, because YOU "neeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeed a car to find a new position"?

Oh, E-Hell no!

Sometimes you don't even need to say the words "I'm afraid that won't be possible."

She got a just-the-facts email stating company policy that we do not falsify information, since it is a violation of our professional ethics as well as (in the situation she was asking for) a federal crime.

Much as I might hope that's the end of that, I am fully expecting more Whine and Cheese in my email box tomorrow morning--and I'm wondering how best to deal with her now that we've stated our policy.
« Last Edit: August 23, 2013, 02:13:29 AM by Waterlight »
“The best lightning rod for your protection is your own spine.”--Ralph Waldo Emerson

Rusty

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If I read your post correctly, you said the job offer was cancelled.

No further correspondence with this person is necessary and if she does contact you again I would either file it to trash or reply telling her you have no further interest in her life or her problems.

Danika

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Wow!  :o The audacity of some people!

I would not respond to her at all. I'd ignore all future voice mails and emails from her.

But I would save them. In case they become numerous or slanderous and you need to cover your behind and prove to others in your department that you never made any mis-steps.

crella

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Quote
I had a run-in earlier this week with a job candidate I'll call Whine and Cheese.  We interviewed her last week and offered her a job... but this past Monday, she was a no-call, no-show for orientation.  We tried calling and emailing her and got no response whatsoever.

Ooooh, I hate when people do that! You go through the whole interview process, pick someone and then they don't show up for work! It's only happened to me once, but it was aggravating. She strung me along (and I gave her the benefit of the doubt) by saying her grandfather had died (I know, but what if...?) The third morning I told her that she no longer had a job. I think she was just hanging in to see if a better offer panned out. I hope you find someone else soon!

Good for you! I don't think you need to answer any more of her mails.


veronaz

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Good grief.  ::)

OP, to answer your question I would not discard anything if you hear from her again.  I would say something like “the job offer was rescinded because (no show/no call), and there is no need for any further contact”.

The reason I say don’t discard anything is you never know……she might have the gall to try to file some kind of complaint – which would go nowhere.  But, you need to keep the paper trail and notes about everything that happened for documentation.  (I'm sure you have better uses for your time, but unfortunately such is life in the business world.)

What a piece of work.  The drama you saw thus far is probably the tip of the iceberg.  Imagine what a prize employee she would have been.  ::)

Best wishes finding a drama-free, reliable employee soon.
« Last Edit: August 22, 2013, 03:37:25 AM by veronaz »

Waterlight

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Good grief.  ::)

OP, to answer your question I would not discard anything if you hear from her again.  I would say something like “the job offer was rescinded because (no show/no call), and there is no need for any further contact”.

She's aware the job offer has been rescinded--but if I hear from her again, I think it might be wise to respond one last time and one last time only--saying "do not contact us again,"  and that any further contact after that will be considered harassment and dealt with accordingly.

Quote
The reason I say don’t discard anything is you never know……she might have the gall to try to file some kind of complaint – which would go nowhere.  But, you need to keep the paper trail and notes about everything that happened for documentation.  (I'm sure you have better uses for your time, but unfortunately such is life in the business world.)

Already doing that...just in case.  And POD to the quote below--we didn't dodge a bullet when we cancelled the job offer, we dodged a nuclear missile!  *Shudder*

Quote
What a piece of work.  The drama you saw thus far is probably the tip of the iceberg.  Imagine what a prize employee she would have been.  ::)

Best wishes finding a drama-free, reliable employee soon.

Thank you!
“The best lightning rod for your protection is your own spine.”--Ralph Waldo Emerson

Mel the Redcap

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Yikes! Talk about a narrow escape! I'm sure she would have been just lovely as a coworker. :P ::) ;D
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greencat

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Wow.  If she contacts you again, I would suggest that you make a formal request that she cease contacting you. 

BeagleMommy

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I wonder what she would have said if you had responded to the stolen items story with "We'll be happy to reschedule your orientation if you can provide a police report indicating that your phone and other items were stolen".

veronaz

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I wonder what she would have said if you had responded to the stolen items story with "We'll be happy to reschedule your orientation if you can provide a police report indicating that your phone and other items were stolen".

I also wondered about a police report. 

Okay, let’s just say for the sake of discussion that the stolen purse/phone story was legit.  She could have gone into the nearest place of business (fast food, grocery store, gas station) and asked to use the phone to call police AND call OP to at least leave a message, apologize, and say she would report to work as soon as she could.  Surely a friend, relative, SOMEONE could have come to get her, lent her a few dollars to get thru the day, and taken her to work.  What’s this nonsense about “not knowing anyone with a phone”?  And how did she end up getting home that day anyway?  Stolen purse usually means stolen keys…someone has all your ID and they can get into your house/apt.  Definitely a ‘call police right away’ situation.

Stuff happens.  It’s like getting into an auto accident on the way to work at a new job.  You’re frantic, upset, but you have to try to keep your head and you have to deal with it and do what you have to do.

But I have a feeling this woman would have had a convoluted excuse for not filing a police report and for everything else.  I think the stolen purse/phone story was baloney.
« Last Edit: August 22, 2013, 01:29:54 PM by veronaz »

MrTango

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Re: No, I will not risk going to jail for you... Waterlight's Spine Story #5
« Reply #10 on: August 22, 2013, 01:47:20 PM »
I'd save every bit of correspondence and put it in a file somewhere just in case she tries to file suit (for whatever imagined reason).

Also, she sent you an email asking you to comit a federal crime?  I'd print a copy of that email and forward it to your company's attorney so they can decide if they are going to forward it to law enforcement.

amylouky

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Re: No, I will not risk going to jail for you... Waterlight's Spine Story #5
« Reply #11 on: August 22, 2013, 01:55:05 PM »
I think I might have replied with, "Please send me the fax number of the auto loan place and I will send them a letter."

Which I would. Only, the contents would be,
"To whom it may concern-
Ms. Whine and Cheese has requested that I verify her employment so that she can secure a car loan from you. Unfortunately, I have to decline, as Ms. W&C is not now, nor has she ever been employed by our company."

blue2000

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Re: No, I will not risk going to jail for you... Waterlight's Spine Story #5
« Reply #12 on: August 22, 2013, 02:14:24 PM »
Something about her story struck me as odd and I finally figured out what it was (besides the obvious conclusion that you dodged a bullet).

She says she couldn't call or come in for the last several days because she has lost her purse. She doesn't know anyone with a phone, or money to lend, or who could give her a ride, or anything. And she is telling you this as she is standing in your office. At work. The one she couldn't get to.

So how the heck could she get to work to tell you she couldn't get to work, if she couldn't get to work? Did the purse snatcher return her purse that morning?
You are only young once. After that you have to think up some other excuse.

gmatoy

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Re: No, I will not risk going to jail for you... Waterlight's Spine Story #5
« Reply #13 on: August 22, 2013, 02:39:38 PM »

She says she couldn't call or come in for the last several days because she has lost her purse. She doesn't know anyone with a phone, or money to lend, or who could give her a ride, or anything. And she is telling you this as she is standing in your office. At work. The one she couldn't get to.


Well, there you go being logical! (I thought the same thing!)

veronaz

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Re: No, I will not risk going to jail for you... Waterlight's Spine Story #5
« Reply #14 on: August 22, 2013, 02:52:51 PM »
 ;D

What’s the matter with you people – don’t you know anything about the street life?  Purse snatchers have a ‘code’:  Once they get the cash, credit cards, etc. they get the address from the victim’s ID, knock on the door, and return the purse just in case the victim needs it because she might be starting a new job.