Author Topic: What do pet rabbits need?  (Read 591 times)

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bonyk

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What do pet rabbits need?
« on: August 28, 2013, 06:26:52 PM »
I am kind of, sort of, maybe possibly considering getting a pet rabbit.  How much work are they?  We currently have a cat, so bunny would have to stay caged while we are at work.  Is that okay for the bunny?  Would a few hours out at night be enough exercise time?  Do they like being pet/held or do they prefer to be left alone?

Rohanna

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Re: What do pet rabbits need?
« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2013, 06:34:05 PM »
I am on my phone so I can't really type a long post easily, but check out the house rabbit society website.
« Last Edit: August 28, 2013, 11:38:06 PM by Rohanna »
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bonyk

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Re: What do pet rabbits need?
« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2013, 06:44:06 PM »
That site is great, thanks!

m2kbug

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Re: What do pet rabbits need?
« Reply #3 on: August 28, 2013, 07:58:24 PM »
Bunnies are not really big on being held and cuddled.  Some are going to be more receptive to it than others.  Do know how to hold properly.  They have sharp claws and those powerful legs can cause some damage, and they can break their backs.  If you need some restraint, hold the scruff of their neck, not the ears, and they like to be tucked in like a football. 

You can litter train them, but this takes some work and expect to find some bunny balls around the house, so contain the bunny so they don't soil the carpet.  Those little corner trays are great.  You may need several for every room you let bunny go in.

They can be destructive and chew, so you'll have to watch them and bunny-proof the house. 

For housing, I used a large dog crate (since I already had one), but there are some really nice bunny cages out there.  We'd let her out for exercise and run loose, just block off certain areas when we were around to watch.  Sometimes I'd let her loose alone in the yard for a little bit.  We would also put her on a leash and take her out.  Use one of those figure-8 harnesses or other bunny approved leash. 

Our bunny did well with the cats.  It was the dog we worried about.  Of course just see how well they do when you're around to supervise. 

I felt like she was too much work, and I probably will never have another one.  I have to fight the urge, though, including my desire to have another ferret and my desire to get a chinchilla or sugar glider :)

Bunnies are nice pets, not really noisy, but do take some work, like any other pets.  Not as easy as the cat.  Our bunny was really sweet and did good with the kids.
« Last Edit: August 28, 2013, 08:15:09 PM by m2kbug »

shhh its me

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Re: What do pet rabbits need?
« Reply #4 on: August 28, 2013, 08:24:28 PM »
 pet rabbits require their picture be posted on the internet , more specifically this thread  :)

I had 2 cats my roommate's child had a dutch bunny and really small dog.   Bunny roughhoused with one cat (at the bunnies instigation. games of chase and tackle ending with grooming and snuggling. the bunny would run in tight circles around the cat if that didn't get the cat to chase it it would ram the cat , then jump on and occasionally nip at its tail ) annoyed the other cat and frankly bullied the dog.  This bunny did like to sit on people laps , especially if the dog was their first and would mug you for broccoli.  If not with the cat its favorite spot to hang out was on the back of the sofa near people shoulders.  It was quasi litter trained , it went on the paper under and around the box not in the box as of when I moved out.  It had a cage for night time , comfort(rabbits live in burrows so like to have a small covered place that is there home ) and to keep it from chewing when everyone was out. Rabbits teeth grow through out their lives so lots of things to chew to wear them down was important.  At this time we couldn't find a leash the rabbit couldn't chew through in seconds so we didn't let it outside, the yard a chain-link fence which the rabbit could have just walked through.

bonyk

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Re: What do pet rabbits need?
« Reply #5 on: August 29, 2013, 11:08:15 AM »
Thanks!  As soon as I read about how not holding them properly can lead to them breaking their backs I decided no bunny until DD is a few years older.

RingTailedLemur

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Re: What do pet rabbits need?
« Reply #6 on: August 29, 2013, 12:14:08 PM »
Bunnies are not really big on being held and cuddled.  Some are going to be more receptive to it than others.  Do know how to hold properly.  They have sharp claws and those powerful legs can cause some damage, and they can break their backs.  If you need some restraint, hold the scruff of their neck, not the ears, and they like to be tucked in like a football. 

You can litter train them, but this takes some work and expect to find some bunny balls around the house, so contain the bunny so they don't soil the carpet.  Those little corner trays are great.  You may need several for every room you let bunny go in.

They can be destructive and chew, so you'll have to watch them and bunny-proof the house. 

For housing, I used a large dog crate (since I already had one), but there are some really nice bunny cages out there.  We'd let her out for exercise and run loose, just block off certain areas when we were around to watch.  Sometimes I'd let her loose alone in the yard for a little bit.  We would also put her on a leash and take her out.  Use one of those figure-8 harnesses or other bunny approved leash. 

Our bunny did well with the cats.  It was the dog we worried about.  Of course just see how well they do when you're around to supervise. 

I felt like she was too much work, and I probably will never have another one.  I have to fight the urge, though, including my desire to have another ferret and my desire to get a chinchilla or sugar glider :)

Bunnies are nice pets, not really noisy, but do take some work, like any other pets.  Not as easy as the cat.  Our bunny was really sweet and did good with the kids.

This is good advice.  Remember also that they live for around 10 years.