Author Topic: Problems in the ladies' room  (Read 28604 times)

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Miss Understood

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Re: Problems in the ladies' room
« Reply #120 on: September 16, 2013, 03:52:01 PM »
It was a large mirror above the sinks, so she could see herself from the waist up.  To see her skirt or pants, she had to stand on the toilet.

I don't know why she didn't buy a mirror for her bedroom door.  The toilet mirror viewing stopped after maintenance complained.

Thanks to you and Mel the Redcap and PastryGoddess for explaining.  I couldn't figure out what she was doing!  But that makes perfect sense now.

VorFemme

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Re: Problems in the ladies' room
« Reply #121 on: September 16, 2013, 05:49:00 PM »
It was a large mirror above the sinks, so she could see herself from the waist up.  To see her skirt or pants, she had to stand on the toilet.

I don't know why she didn't buy a mirror for her bedroom door.  The toilet mirror viewing stopped after maintenance complained.

Thanks to you and Mel the Redcap and PastryGoddess for explaining.  I couldn't figure out what she was doing!  But that makes perfect sense now.

I could - I just couldn't figure out how she was standing on the toilet SAFELY in the dorm!

Some of those are wall hung instead of sitting on the floor - so standing on them is more weight being supported than just someone sitting on them (some weight would be on the person's feet).  Which might not be safe...depending on the person...and how long the toilet had been there - corrosion on the bolts that was hidden behind the walls is still going to weaken the support for the toilet.

I have never had a toilet break when I sat on it - the very idea sounds painful, though. And standing on it would give you that much further to fall on what is usually a solid floor (maybe not in homes - but hotels, dorm rooms, stores, and other business locations).
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WillyNilly

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Re: Problems in the ladies' room
« Reply #122 on: September 16, 2013, 05:55:12 PM »
Before reading eHell, it never even crossed my mind that someone would use their foot to operate anything designed to be operated by hand.

Before reading e-Hell it never crossed my mind anyone would ever use their hand on the prong type flushers. On a tank toilet I use my hand but not on one like this: http://image.ec21.com/image/greenkorea/oimg_GC00196484_CA01440165/Automatic_Toilet_Flusher_With_Manual_Lever_.jpg unless its in someone's home.
As far as I know they were designed for either hand or foot usage (and I say as someone who does have this type in my home. Yes I use my hand at home, but I'm not convinced it was designed exclusively for hand flushing.)

If its like this: http://www.luxury-gadgets.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/Royal-Flush-14k-Solid-Gold-Toilet-Flusher2.jpg I use my hand.

Also in regard to the idea of "use your hands, you're about to wash them anyway" - I guess we go to very different places! Because I would say a solid 65% of public restrooms have no soap. so no, no one is washing their hands after they go, people are merely rinsing their hands and drying them. Minimizing touching surfaces likely to be germ ridden, like flushers that people flush with their shoes, is simply prudent.
« Last Edit: September 16, 2013, 06:04:09 PM by WillyNilly »

Yvaine

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Re: Problems in the ladies' room
« Reply #123 on: September 16, 2013, 06:22:50 PM »
Before reading eHell, it never even crossed my mind that someone would use their foot to operate anything designed to be operated by hand.

Before reading e-Hell it never crossed my mind anyone would ever use their hand on the prong type flushers. On a tank toilet I use my hand but not on one like this: http://image.ec21.com/image/greenkorea/oimg_GC00196484_CA01440165/Automatic_Toilet_Flusher_With_Manual_Lever_.jpg unless its in someone's home.
As far as I know they were designed for either hand or foot usage (and I say as someone who does have this type in my home. Yes I use my hand at home, but I'm not convinced it was designed exclusively for hand flushing.)

If its like this: http://www.luxury-gadgets.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/Royal-Flush-14k-Solid-Gold-Toilet-Flusher2.jpg I use my hand.

Also in regard to the idea of "use your hands, you're about to wash them anyway" - I guess we go to very different places! Because I would say a solid 65% of public restrooms have no soap. so no, no one is washing their hands after they go, people are merely rinsing their hands and drying them. Minimizing touching surfaces likely to be germ ridden, like flushers that people flush with their shoes, is simply prudent.

Usually when something's designed for feet, though, it's really obvious that it's a foot pedal. It's not going to be up in the air. Like if you see a trash can with a foot pedal, the pedal is down on the ground and it's pretty obvious that it's for feet. I have a preference for using hands, but I'm not horribly fussed about people using feet...but I do find it hard to believe when people say they never even imagined someone might use their hand.

Once in a while, sure, a restroom is out of soap, but in my experience it's nowhere near that common, and when there is no soap it's not because that's actually policy but because they've run out and the staff hasn't been in to notice it yet. In fact, I think it's the law that soap be provided, along with those signs about how employees must wash their hands.

camlan

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Re: Problems in the ladies' room
« Reply #124 on: September 16, 2013, 06:28:17 PM »
Soap merely helps the water remove dirt and germs. Briskly rubbing your hands together in a washing motion under running water for the recommended length of time will remove the majority of dirt and germs from your hands.

Briskly rubbing your hands together in a washing motion *without* any water for the recommended length of time will remove some of the dirt and germs.

Soap helps get your hands cleaner, but it's the water and the hand rubbing that count.

Some interesting info on soap here: http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2012/06/soap-how-much-cleaner-does-it-actually-make-your-hands/258839/
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WillyNilly

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Re: Problems in the ladies' room
« Reply #125 on: September 16, 2013, 06:33:13 PM »
Before reading eHell, it never even crossed my mind that someone would use their foot to operate anything designed to be operated by hand.

Before reading e-Hell it never crossed my mind anyone would ever use their hand on the prong type flushers. On a tank toilet I use my hand but not on one like this: http://image.ec21.com/image/greenkorea/oimg_GC00196484_CA01440165/Automatic_Toilet_Flusher_With_Manual_Lever_.jpg unless its in someone's home.
As far as I know they were designed for either hand or foot usage (and I say as someone who does have this type in my home. Yes I use my hand at home, but I'm not convinced it was designed exclusively for hand flushing.)

If its like this: http://www.luxury-gadgets.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/Royal-Flush-14k-Solid-Gold-Toilet-Flusher2.jpg I use my hand.

Also in regard to the idea of "use your hands, you're about to wash them anyway" - I guess we go to very different places! Because I would say a solid 65% of public restrooms have no soap. so no, no one is washing their hands after they go, people are merely rinsing their hands and drying them. Minimizing touching surfaces likely to be germ ridden, like flushers that people flush with their shoes, is simply prudent.

Usually when something's designed for feet, though, it's really obvious that it's a foot pedal. It's not going to be up in the air. Like if you see a trash can with a foot pedal, the pedal is down on the ground and it's pretty obvious that it's for feet. I have a preference for using hands, but I'm not horribly fussed about people using feet...but I do find it hard to believe when people say they never even imagined someone might use their hand.

Once in a while, sure, a restroom is out of soap, but in my experience it's nowhere near that common, and when there is no soap it's not because that's actually policy but because they've run out and the staff hasn't been in to notice it yet. In fact, I think it's the law that soap be provided, along with those signs about how employees must wash their hands.

I don't know what to tell you, I seriously never did in my wildest dreams imagine people used their hands on those prongs when out in public. I just didn't. My mother, and my aunts, and my grandmothers, and my babysitters all always used their foot and instructed me to. My friends (as kids and now as adults) use their foot. Now that my friends and I are adults, I overhear them teaching their kids to use their foot. Watching feet under the stall doors in a crowded restroom, when the feet turn backwards to the door, and then one go up, that's when you know the stall is about to become empty - because everyone turns around faces the toilet and flushes with their feet. I actually suspect my best uses her foot when at my home simply because I have that lever type flusher.

As for soap, often yes there are dispensers, although certainly not always, but more often then not they are empty IME. Your experience might very well differ, I don't doubt it, but my point is I would never count on there being soap.

Yvaine

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Re: Problems in the ladies' room
« Reply #126 on: September 16, 2013, 06:40:01 PM »
I don't know what to tell you, I seriously never did in my wildest dreams imagine people used their hands on those prongs when out in public. I just didn't. My mother, and my aunts, and my grandmothers, and my babysitters all always used their foot and instructed me to. My friends (as kids and now as adults) use their foot. Now that my friends and I are adults, I overhear them teaching their kids to use their foot. Watching feet under the stall doors in a crowded restroom, when the feet turn backwards to the door, and then one go up, that's when you know the stall is about to become empty - because everyone turns around faces the toilet and flushes with their feet. I actually suspect my best uses her foot when at my home simply because I have that lever type flusher.

But why would they design it round, and up in the air, then? I'm genuinely confused. Stuff to be operated with the feet is usually lower to the ground, and also flat. It does sound like this is a Thing in your social circle for whatever reason, but I think the designer's intent is pretty clear. And I'm kind of skeeved out by the idea that people are watching people's feet in the bathroom long enough to see whether they're going up on one foot during the process (maybe a quick glance to see if the stall is really occupied or just has the door closed, but this seems more like intent study!).

menley

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Re: Problems in the ladies' room
« Reply #127 on: September 16, 2013, 06:45:38 PM »
I don't know what to tell you, I seriously never did in my wildest dreams imagine people used their hands on those prongs when out in public. I just didn't. My mother, and my aunts, and my grandmothers, and my babysitters all always used their foot and instructed me to. My friends (as kids and now as adults) use their foot. Now that my friends and I are adults, I overhear them teaching their kids to use their foot. Watching feet under the stall doors in a crowded restroom, when the feet turn backwards to the door, and then one go up, that's when you know the stall is about to become empty - because everyone turns around faces the toilet and flushes with their feet. I actually suspect my best uses her foot when at my home simply because I have that lever type flusher.

But why would they design it round, and up in the air, then? I'm genuinely confused. Stuff to be operated with the feet is usually lower to the ground, and also flat. It does sound like this is a Thing in your social circle for whatever reason, but I think the designer's intent is pretty clear. And I'm kind of skeeved out by the idea that people are watching people's feet in the bathroom long enough to see whether they're going up on one foot during the process (maybe a quick glance to see if the stall is really occupied or just has the door closed, but this seems more like intent study!).

Yes, I agree. If it was actually intended to be used by a foot, it would be on the ground - foot-level. Instead it's hand-level.

I honestly don't care which people use, as I always carry hand sanitizer so if there isn't soap in the bathroom, I scrub my hands underwater, dry them, and then use hand sanitizer. But to suggest that it's designed for foot use is just ... baffling.

esposita

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Re: Problems in the ladies' room
« Reply #128 on: September 16, 2013, 07:06:34 PM »
I use my foot and lean waaaay back, because once those things start flushing who knows what they are throwing up into the air. I don't want that stuff on my face. And some of them flush so strongly, I'm afraid of getting sucked into the vortex. :P Okay not really, but having the top part of me over the toilet just grosses me out.

WillyNilly

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Re: Problems in the ladies' room
« Reply #129 on: September 16, 2013, 09:11:50 PM »
I don't know what to tell you, I seriously never did in my wildest dreams imagine people used their hands on those prongs when out in public. I just didn't. My mother, and my aunts, and my grandmothers, and my babysitters all always used their foot and instructed me to. My friends (as kids and now as adults) use their foot. Now that my friends and I are adults, I overhear them teaching their kids to use their foot. Watching feet under the stall doors in a crowded restroom, when the feet turn backwards to the door, and then one go up, that's when you know the stall is about to become empty - because everyone turns around faces the toilet and flushes with their feet. I actually suspect my best uses her foot when at my home simply because I have that lever type flusher.

But why would they design it round, and up in the air, then? I'm genuinely confused. Stuff to be operated with the feet is usually lower to the ground, and also flat. It does sound like this is a Thing in your social circle for whatever reason, but I think the designer's intent is pretty clear. And I'm kind of skeeved out by the idea that people are watching people's feet in the bathroom long enough to see whether they're going up on one foot during the process (maybe a quick glance to see if the stall is really occupied or just has the door closed, but this seems more like intent study!).

Well you left out my original quote where I wrote:
Quote
...As far as I know they were designed for either hand or foot usage...

Designing something that can be used in more then one fashion seems like a much better design for a public space then something that can only be used in one way.

As for watching feet, its a matter of a line in a ladies room. If you are waiting several minutes for a stall to open where do you look? I look at the row of stalls, so I can you know, see when one opens, immediately. And sometimes the angle is such that one can see the feet of the people inside.

Yvaine

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Re: Problems in the ladies' room
« Reply #130 on: September 16, 2013, 09:23:04 PM »
I don't know what to tell you, I seriously never did in my wildest dreams imagine people used their hands on those prongs when out in public. I just didn't. My mother, and my aunts, and my grandmothers, and my babysitters all always used their foot and instructed me to. My friends (as kids and now as adults) use their foot. Now that my friends and I are adults, I overhear them teaching their kids to use their foot. Watching feet under the stall doors in a crowded restroom, when the feet turn backwards to the door, and then one go up, that's when you know the stall is about to become empty - because everyone turns around faces the toilet and flushes with their feet. I actually suspect my best uses her foot when at my home simply because I have that lever type flusher.

But why would they design it round, and up in the air, then? I'm genuinely confused. Stuff to be operated with the feet is usually lower to the ground, and also flat. It does sound like this is a Thing in your social circle for whatever reason, but I think the designer's intent is pretty clear. And I'm kind of skeeved out by the idea that people are watching people's feet in the bathroom long enough to see whether they're going up on one foot during the process (maybe a quick glance to see if the stall is really occupied or just has the door closed, but this seems more like intent study!).

Well you left out my original quote where I wrote:
Quote
...As far as I know they were designed for either hand or foot usage...

Designing something that can be used in more then one fashion seems like a much better design for a public space then something that can only be used in one way.

Oh, sorry, I must have misunderstood you somehow--it sounded like you were saying you never imagined anyone would use their hands, based on the bolded, but that other quote makes it sound like you do know both methods might be used. I'm just confused, I suppose.

As for watching feet, its a matter of a line in a ladies room. If you are waiting several minutes for a stall to open where do you look? I look at the row of stalls, so I can you know, see when one opens, immediately. And sometimes the angle is such that one can see the feet of the people inside.

I look at the doors and head toward one if I see it starting to open. I don't watch what people are doing behind or under it.

wolfie

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Re: Problems in the ladies' room
« Reply #131 on: September 16, 2013, 09:43:35 PM »
It does sound like this is a Thing in your social circle for whatever reason, but I think the designer's intent is pretty clear.
I have read at least one article asking what exactly the designer's intent was - hand or foot - since the placement is really not ideal for either. SO I think that for many people the designer's intent is not clear at all.

WillyNilly

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Re: Problems in the ladies' room
« Reply #132 on: September 16, 2013, 10:19:14 PM »
I don't know what to tell you, I seriously never did in my wildest dreams imagine people used their hands on those prongs when out in public. I just didn't. My mother, and my aunts, and my grandmothers, and my babysitters all always used their foot and instructed me to. My friends (as kids and now as adults) use their foot. Now that my friends and I are adults, I overhear them teaching their kids to use their foot. Watching feet under the stall doors in a crowded restroom, when the feet turn backwards to the door, and then one go up, that's when you know the stall is about to become empty - because everyone turns around faces the toilet and flushes with their feet. I actually suspect my best uses her foot when at my home simply because I have that lever type flusher.

But why would they design it round, and up in the air, then? I'm genuinely confused. Stuff to be operated with the feet is usually lower to the ground, and also flat. It does sound like this is a Thing in your social circle for whatever reason, but I think the designer's intent is pretty clear. And I'm kind of skeeved out by the idea that people are watching people's feet in the bathroom long enough to see whether they're going up on one foot during the process (maybe a quick glance to see if the stall is really occupied or just has the door closed, but this seems more like intent study!).

Well you left out my original quote where I wrote:
Quote
...As far as I know they were designed for either hand or foot usage...

Designing something that can be used in more then one fashion seems like a much better design for a public space then something that can only be used in one way.

Oh, sorry, I must have misunderstood you somehow--it sounded like you were saying you never imagined anyone would use their hands, based on the bolded, but that other quote makes it sound like you do know both methods might be used. I'm just confused, I suppose.

As for watching feet, its a matter of a line in a ladies room. If you are waiting several minutes for a stall to open where do you look? I look at the row of stalls, so I can you know, see when one opens, immediately. And sometimes the angle is such that one can see the feet of the people inside.

I look at the doors and head toward one if I see it starting to open. I don't watch what people are doing behind or under it.

It never really occurred to me people used their hands on those prongs in public restrooms. As I initially stated I have that type of flusher in my home. At home I use my hand. But in public I have always known them to be foot operated.

Sort of like at home I might lick my fingers while eating but in public I would never do that.

Yvaine

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Re: Problems in the ladies' room
« Reply #133 on: September 16, 2013, 10:26:08 PM »
It never really occurred to me people used their hands on those prongs in public restrooms. As I initially stated I have that type of flusher in my home. At home I use my hand. But in public I have always known them to be foot operated.

Sort of like at home I might lick my fingers while eating but in public I would never do that.

Just to be sure of what you're saying, are you implying that flushing a public toilet with one's hand is as gauche as licking one's fingers while eating in public?

WillyNilly

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Re: Problems in the ladies' room
« Reply #134 on: September 16, 2013, 11:52:55 PM »
It never really occurred to me people used their hands on those prongs in public restrooms. As I initially stated I have that type of flusher in my home. At home I use my hand. But in public I have always known them to be foot operated.

Sort of like at home I might lick my fingers while eating but in public I would never do that.

Just to be sure of what you're saying, are you implying that flushing a public toilet with one's hand is as gauche as licking one's fingers while eating in public?

No I'm saying its just not something I would ever consider doing under normal circumstances and never really thought other people did under normal circumstances.

I have to say I'm not really sure why you are fighting me on this so hard. I'm 37 years old. Before e-hell (4-5 years ago?) I never heard of someone flushing a (public wand stye) toilet with their hand. I admit its not a conversation I've had with any sort of frequency but none the less it truly never ever occurred to me. To me, it was just absolutely unconditionally normal and taken for granted that everyone flushed with their foot unless there was some major reason they could not. Its what we did in my elementary school, and junior high and high school. Its what my parents and grandparents and extended family taught me. Its what my friends do. Its just the norm in my experience. I don't know why that statement is shocking or unbelievable or offensive. It simply is what it is. I'm not insulting anyone, or judging anyone. I'm just surprised its not as common place as I believed it to be (although I'm not convinced its not the more popular method - other posters have also said they always flush with their foot).