Author Topic: Linkedin newbie  (Read 2097 times)

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whiskeytangofoxtrot

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Linkedin newbie
« on: August 28, 2013, 10:42:47 AM »
I finally started up a LinkedIn profile, figuring it was time to build my business contacts and "cast my bread upon the water" so to speak. Looking around, I see where members can post recommendations and endorsements on other member's profiles. I'm not sure what the etiquette for this is, however- who initiates? What should one say? Any other suggestions?

Many thanks!

WillyNilly

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Re: Linkedin newbie
« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2013, 12:10:47 PM »
As far as actual written recommendations, you can send a request and ask a colleague (former or current) to write you a recommendation, or you can just write one for someone if you want even if not asked. The subject of the recommendation gets to approve or reject it, so there is no harm in just writing one for someone if you are inclined to.

As for endorsements, LinkedIn itself will ask you to endorse people in your contacts each time you log in. You can do so or you can skip. Because of how they are solicited, they are mostly meaningless. Personally I do try to be honest in endorsements, I will only endorse someone if I personally know for a fact the person is actually good at the skill listed, but some people seem to just agree to all of them (I've been endorsed by friends for "copy editing" for example... and I really only even have the vaguest idea what they even means, I certainly  have never done it professionally.)

Cat-Fu

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Re: Linkedin newbie
« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2013, 12:38:26 PM »
I agree, endorsements on LinkedIn are meaningless.

It's pretty common to request recommendations, and to offer to write one in return. (So don't ask for a recommendation from someone you can't say anything nice about!)
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Steve

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Re: Linkedin newbie
« Reply #3 on: August 28, 2013, 12:54:13 PM »
I must say that recommendations on LinkedIn are usually meaningless. Most of them are reciprocal: "I will recommend you if you recommend me". I do not do this because of the principle involved. I write recommendations for those I feel deserve them, and I never request them.

If someone I recommend writes one for me, I usually do not publish it on my profile.



Raintree

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Re: Linkedin newbie
« Reply #4 on: August 28, 2013, 09:27:13 PM »
I was just going to post a thread about this myself, when I saw this.

Because I was wondering the same thing. I recently put up a profile; many of the contacts I have on there are friends, and they keep endorsing my skills even though they actually have no idea whether or not I am any good at what I do, since they only know me in a friend capacity. And now I wonder if I am supposed to endorse them. But I don't know anything about their skill levels either, so it does seem completely meaningless.

veronaz

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Re: Linkedin newbie
« Reply #5 on: August 28, 2013, 10:23:53 PM »
LinkedIn can also be used by rejected lovers, stalkers, and collection agencies to find out where a person works.

Cat-Fu

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Re: Linkedin newbie
« Reply #6 on: August 30, 2013, 12:44:29 PM »
LinkedIn can also be used by rejected lovers, stalkers, and collection agencies to find out where a person works.

LinkedIn does have privacy protections to help prevent things like that...
“Poetry is a sword of lightning, ever unsheathed, which consumes the scabbard that would contain it.” PBS

veronaz

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Re: Linkedin newbie
« Reply #7 on: August 30, 2013, 12:56:40 PM »
LinkedIn can also be used by rejected lovers, stalkers, and collection agencies to find out where a person works.

LinkedIn does have privacy protections to help prevent things like that...

There is still a problem:
http://www.buzzfeed.com/justinesharrock/linkedin-has-a-stalker-problem

They need to improve their "privacy" protections.  As mentioned in this article, you can't block individual users and you can limit views to people in your network.  If you type in a person's name on google and they use LinkedIn, there is a good chance you can find out information about them

Cat-Fu

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Re: Linkedin newbie
« Reply #8 on: August 30, 2013, 01:04:58 PM »
I agree that LinkedIn needs a block option, but it is really easy to block yourself from search engines and choose not to have a public profile (as it notes in the article you just linked).

TBH, though, I'm not sure what stalkers have to do with the etiquette of LinkedIn.
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TootsNYC

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Re: Linkedin newbie
« Reply #9 on: August 31, 2013, 10:24:04 AM »
I don't use LinkedIn that much, mostly because I think people overreach and use the wrong standard.
A common problem in etiquette is when people confuse social with business. And they insist that coworkers go out for drinks; or they feel they'd be rude to switch dentists or hairdressers.

LinkedIn reflects some of that confusion. The aforementioned endorsement of my [work duty] skills by someone I went to high school with; she knows where I've worked, but she's never, ever seen me do my job. And in fact, though it's not "rude," I think her endorsement *is* a "bad form" etiquette violation.

I've written recommendations for other people--like my real-life recommendations, they're pretty detailed and specific, therefore long. I think they're pretty convincing, and I think the chances are good that *if* someone was on the fence about a hire, my words would tip them over into choosing my colleague.

I won't "link" with relatives or friends. I keep it for colleagues I've worked with only. I won't link with people who've applied to me for freelance work but *haven't* been hired.  Basically, if I know you well enough that I'd be happy to answer Q's for you about a place you think you might want to work, or would be glad to call a friend on your behalf for info or to say, "he's really pleasant to work with, and when we worked together, I always found him helpful, even though I didn't see his work day-to-day close"? Then I'll link.

Partly that's because I just don't want to get into a far-flung web of connections. I don't want to do those sorts of things for just anybody--I don't have time.

whiskeytangofoxtrot

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Re: Linkedin newbie
« Reply #10 on: September 03, 2013, 12:20:26 PM »
You've all given me food for thought- thanks! I've had the thought that recommendations and endorsements were probably more meaningless reciprocal back-scratching than anything, and might not carry much weight. On the other hand, if I saw someone who'd been on LinkedIn for a while and had built up a number of contacts, but had no recommendations and endorsements from any of them, I would probably wonder why.

mimi_cat

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Re: Linkedin newbie
« Reply #11 on: September 19, 2013, 03:05:50 PM »
On the other hand, if I saw someone who'd been on LinkedIn for a while and had built up a number of contacts, but had no recommendations and endorsements from any of them, I would probably wonder why.

I don't pay any attention to endorsements or recommendations.  In fact, I have my profile set so that endorsements do not display on my profile at all.  I've had too many people "endorse" me for things I don't do.  I do have a number of connections that are not former co-workers;  I am on the board of a large local professional organization and many people "know" me that way. 

I also think recommendations are kind of meaningless.  Recruiters aren't going to put any weight in them - if they need a reference to hire you they will call someone directly, not view it on your linked in page. 

Morticia

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Re: Linkedin newbie
« Reply #12 on: September 21, 2013, 11:17:36 AM »
You can refuse endorsements for skills you don't have. I have done this in the past.
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TootsNYC

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Re: Linkedin newbie
« Reply #13 on: September 22, 2013, 08:05:25 PM »
I don't worry if there are no recommendations for someone. I've written them for people, and it's a pain in the neck. There are many great professionals that I'm linked to, but I haven't written them a recommendation.

If you *want* a recommendation of them from me, feel free to email me and say, "I see you worked with her--what can you tell me about her?"

Then again, if there is a recommendation, I take it somewhat seriously, since I know what a pain it is to put it on there. If it's someone who has actually worked with them, it carries some weight.

(And, of all the ones that were about people I personally knew, they were accurate to my own knowledge of them, so statistically speaking, I trust the actual written recommendation pretty much. As much as I trust anything.)